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Thread: Alaska auction permits

  1. #1
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    Red face Alaska auction permits

    Does anyone know the theory and practice of these permits? For instance on the ADFG website it lists 7 special auction permits issued which appear to be fund raisers for other other states and organizations. Our own FNAWS or ADFG are not listed. So..are these organizations splitting the pot with ADFG or something? I mean why is ADFG reporting no money for sheep surveys, yet Utah is earning money for managing their sheep by auctioning Alaska special permits for TMA? And California is managing their sheep by auctioning a Kenai moose special permit? Just seems like somethings missing here.

    http://www.wildlife.alaska.gov/hunt_...08_winners.pdf
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    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
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    Default

    Each year Any org. can apply for a special/Governor tag.
    Bison
    Kenai moose
    Dall sheep
    Eton Elk

    I might be forgetting one a couple more. After they apply, they will review and award the special permits to be auctioned off. They know which Org will bring in more money, so the highly coveted tags will go to them. We the ABA have been lucky enough in the past to have been award the Bison, Kenai moos and the Elk..
    Living the Alaskan Dream
    Gary Keller
    Anchorage, AK

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    Supporting Member AFHunter's Avatar
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    Default Link to describe process

    Here is a link to the page that describes this whole thing. http://wildlife.alaska.gov/index.cfm?adfg=auctions.main

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    Smile thanks

    Thanks for the info AG/AF. I read the link and given the following "An amount equal to administrative costs plus up to 10% of the net proceeds may be retained by the organization; the remainder is used to fund state wildlife management programs."

    It looks like if the Conklin foundation auctions of DS123 they get 10% and ADFG gets 90%. Sounds like a sweet deal for us. But then we should be able to fund sheep management with those funds right? So why do we have no sheep surveys?
    I come home with an honestly earned feeling that something good has taken place. It makes no difference whether I got anything, it has to do with how the day was spent. Fred Bear

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    Default One word

    Misssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssss- Management!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  6. #6

    Default The Dark Side of Governor's Permits

    The State of Alaska modeled their governor's permits (what these permits are called) after a program in Wyoming where the money raised from the permit auction or raffle was used to fund direct sheep research or management. Non-profit wildlife-oriented organizations can apply to compete for the permits given out in the fall every year.

    The down side is that when queried for the last few years about what the Department had used that money for since the program began, they finally admitted that they had no idea where it went all these years. We are talking almost a million dollars for all governor's permits awarded. Rest assured (or not) that money being spent on Dall sheep governor's permits has NOT gone to sheep. Likewise, other species permit earnings also haven't a good history of being re-funded back to support their respective species programs directly either.

    The statute that created the program, sponsored by Con Bundy (I think in 1997) states clearly that the foremost directive in the governor's permit program is to derive a PROFIT for creating funds to be applied to wildlife programs. However, the Division of Wildlife Conservation has had a wide variety of folks making the decisions over the years about which organization gets the permits. Almost never have they given away the permits based on the most likely opportunity to raise the most funds, or profit, for the program.

    Sometimes they give it to a different organization simply to "spread the wealth." Sometimes they give it to a new organization that has never applied before. But the Division has not done a good job allocating out permits according to the organization with the highest profit potential. Worse yet, and perhaps the biggest "crime" of the entire program is that the money is seen as "free" funds by the Department, with no strings attached, and sheep permit money does NOT go back into sheep management or research.

    As far as why we don't have sheep surveys, the Department has determined that they can rest on their laurels because a full curl harvest regime is seen by the Department as self-managing. Besides, they prioritize the budgeted funds allocated to high profile species such as moose, wolf, bear, and caribou, thus Area Biologists don't have sufficient funds to cover much sheep work when they are directed to do higher profile species work.

    The Department has failed to be accountable for the funds because very few people are looking and asking questions, and until pressed, the Department will continue spending its "free" money as it wishes regardless if governor's permit species are being short changed budgetarily when these permit funds become untrackable in the Department's accounting system.

    Sheep are not a Department priority, though they might be dear to the heart of some Area Biologists. Even the Regional Supervisor of Region II reported the status of every game species for every GMU at the Spring Board of Game meeting in Anchorage a few years ago. He went through each GMU citing the status and management objective for every game species. He not once mentioned Dall sheep, not in Unit 14, or on the Kenai, or 13... Sheep were not mentioned at all. At the time Pete Buist was on the Board of Game, and after Jeff Hughes was done citing the status of game species in Region II, Pete asked Jeff, "So, do you have any sheep in Region II?"

    Needless to say, Jeff stumbled and fumbled but it seemed pretty clear that sheep were not considered worthy of inclusion in the Regional status report to the Board of Game. An oversight? If so, it was darned Freudian in my book.

  7. #7
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    Default specialpermits

    Solly,

    It used (in the long ago) to be that Governors could give permits to hunt (particularly in the west) as political favors to "get things done." Alaska had this same system up till the early to mid-'70s when Gov. Eagan gave a permit to the Shah of Iran's nephew to hunt sheep. Seemed reasonable, we were allies with the family, and there's lots of sheep hunting in Iran when it's not at war with somebody or other. Well, the Shah's nephew came over and spent most of his time stealing peregrine falcons (falconry is big in the Arab world, and peregrines are considered very desirable). Alaska pergerines were not endangered in the Brooks Range at the time, but peregrines were "endangered" elsewhere. So, that was the end of that.

    When I was with ADF&G as the sheep biologist, Wyoming's Gov. started to donate a permit to FNAWS (National) for auction. I suggested we could revive "governor's permits" in Alaska and use them to fund research and management of sheep (my thing at the time--and still today). The Department was not interested AT ALL. I tried for a while and turned the idea over to Alaska FNAWS.

    A dentist named Ken Wynne got Conn Bundy to push the legislation, and special permits were reestablished. They are not, strictly speaking, Governor's permits again. The Gov has nothing to do with them. They are awarded by the Director of Wildlife through his "shop."

    They are still awarded to "get things done," but the thing they get done now is to raise money. Here's how it works. Various non-profits essentiall provide the Department a prospectus saying which permit or permits they want, and how much money they expect to raise. The law says the Dept is to decided where to award them based on maximizing revenue for the Department. In the past, this rule has not been followed, and permits have been "spred around" in some sort of equality program. Dollars were not formally maximized. Perhaps that has changed. The dollars are not tied to any species (a problem for me as a sheep guy because we could run a spectacular sheep program on just the sheep dollars).

    When the permits are sold or raffled, 90% of the money comes back to the Dept. Where it goes has never been rigorously tracked. Since it's beginning in 1997, I think, the program has generated almost a million bucks.

    Alaska FNAWS does not generally apply for these permits because other vendors (particularly National FNAWS) can sell them for more. National FNAWS has traditionally been able to get more money out of sheep permits than any other vendor. Some how this year, for the first time, perhaps ever, National FNAWS did not get a sheep permit to sell. I had significant background correspondence about the system with ADF&G prior to the permit awards. Shamelessly, I lobbied for sheep permits for National FNAWS, but the awards that came to National FNAWS were a Brown Bear hunt and a Kodiak Goat Hunt.

    I don't know what the basis for the decision was. I presume we were "outcompeted" by other non-profits judged as better prospects to produce dollars than National FNAWS.

    Another of Alaska FNAWS objectives is to get dollars from the sheep permits (there are three) allocated to a sheep program. There is currently no legal obligation for the Dept. to do this, but in the beginning, there was a "gentlemen's agreement" that this would be ideal.

    Something happened during the last 10 years.

    Hope this answers your questions.

    Wayne

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