Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 28

Thread: 454 alaskan cycling problems

  1. #1
    Member sharksinthesalsa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    wasilla ak
    Posts
    640

    Default 454 alaskan cycling problems

    my ruger alaskan is having some cycling problems when i shoot 45 colts through it...i might be able to shoot twice before it doesn't work ...it has never messed up with the 454's but i don't know whats causing it....but when it doesn't work it seems to get caught half way and when i turn the cylinder by hand so that it is in the correct position it ussually does it again....i have to open it and spin it around and then try it ..i dont' know if it helps but sometimes it works....any ideas?
    "early to bed, early to rise, fish like hell, and make up lies"

  2. #2

    Default

    I have a Ruger Super Redhawk .454. If I shoot lead bullets in .45 Colt, mine gets tight and does not turn easily. Shooting jacketed bullets, it will cycle all day. Are you shooting straight lead or jacketed bullets?
    Now just why in the hell do I have to press "1" for English???

  3. #3

    Default

    My .44 Alaskan did this, and I tried several fixes involving more detailed cleaning, polishing various parts, different loads, different primers, etc.

    With mine it wasn't a matter of getting tight, it would lock up.

    At first it was OK on S/A with warmer .44 loads, but bound up with mid-range loads. That seems similar to your problem. After my efforts it improved to being 100% on S/A with any load, but would still bind up on D/A after one or two rounds. I think the problem with my gun was with the length of the hammer strut, but after all the experimenting I had already done I sent it back to Ruger.

    More info:

    http://www.rugerforum.com/phpBB/view...hlight=binding

  4. #4
    Member sharksinthesalsa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    wasilla ak
    Posts
    640

    Default lead bullets

    i have been shooting only cast lead....my next step was to try copper jackets....in the instuction manual it aludes to haveing to lubricate something if you shoot only lead.....i forget what exactly it said....but thanks for the info guys
    "early to bed, early to rise, fish like hell, and make up lies"

  5. #5
    Member rimfirematt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    2,133

    Default

    yeah, ill second the lead stuff. Mine will bind up shooting lead. A good cleaning fixes it for a while.

  6. #6
    Member sharksinthesalsa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    wasilla ak
    Posts
    640

    Default only the 45 colts though

    i can shoot lead all day with the 454 loads.....and then try to shoot two colts and itll freeze....even if they are the big 45 loads 335gr..i've been shooting the alaskan backpacker ammo and am gonna try some hornady copper jacketed bullets
    "early to bed, early to rise, fish like hell, and make up lies"

  7. #7
    Member alaskamonte's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    101

    Default Binding Rugers-

    Hello, kinda hard to do any measuring from here, grin
    I'd guess it's chamber throats being undersized (common with Rugers) and/or cylinder gap.

    The tight throats don't affect jacketed bullets and they'll spring back and bump up in the bore, cast bullets lose a few thousands of lead which can gum up everything.

    Brownells sells reamers for .45 (.4525) and even .44 (.431), just got a new Smith .44 629 and the throats were .427-.428 so had to open them up.

  8. #8
    Member sharksinthesalsa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    wasilla ak
    Posts
    640

    Default i don't know a whole lot about pistols

    your talking about the gap between the cylinder and the barrel.....what do you mean by the jacketed bullets pringing back into the bore.........i clean the snot out of it every time i shoot it and it will bind before i can get six shots off.....only .45 though......what does the reamer do....does it clean the barrel?
    "early to bed, early to rise, fish like hell, and make up lies"

  9. #9

    Default

    The .454 loads are longer than the .45 Colt, and the bullet has less "jump" before it gets into the rifling. A .45 Colt bullet comes out of the case, and has quite a jump, allowing the bullet to get a bit askewed before it hits the bore, shaving lead in the process on the edge of the forcing cone. I had a .357 Model 19 that did the same with lead and .38 rounds, and a .686 that would shoot either all day long. Jacketed bullets allow the bullet to stay intact in this process, resulting in much less shaving. After a while if you don't clean it well even with jacketed bullets, it will build up copper and can be a ****** to remove. Keep it clean, and you won't have as many problems. I have shot hunderds of .45 Colts through mine, and it only locks up when shooting lead.
    Now just why in the hell do I have to press "1" for English???

  10. #10
    Member alaskamonte's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    101

    Default Chamber Throats Undersized?

    Cheapest fix is an airplane ride to Ruger for warranty repair.

    Ruger and even S&Ws tend to have tight throats (the end of the cylinder where the bullets exit and then enter the forcing cone.
    The tight throats act as a bullet sizer, squeezing the bullet down from (cowboy loads can be as large as .454 and Buffalo Bores run .4525) .452-.454 to what the throat size is, typically the Rugers are .450.

    The lead squeezed/sized off the bullet is what gums up the works.

    The jacketed slugs squeeze through then spring back without losing material and the pressure of the cartridge "bumps" it up filling the land and grooves properly.

  11. #11
    Member sharksinthesalsa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    wasilla ak
    Posts
    640

    Default i see

    thanks guys....thanks makes alot more sense now....what are you guys using for bullets....factory or handload....are there any good factory .454 loads over 300gr that are jacketed or are they all lead at that point......since i have been having problem with the 45's i think i'm going to shoot strictly .454 since thats what i'll be carrying...and the point of impact is quite a bit different coming out of the 2 1/2" barrel...i want to find one good heavy load and just shoot that....i had been shooting 370gr and then went down to 335 (both lead) and the 335 were shooting almost a foot. more like 8-10", higher than the 370gr at 30 paces
    "early to bed, early to rise, fish like hell, and make up lies"

  12. #12

    Default Sounds like .....

    unburned powder is binding it up. Try cleaning it real well....and I mean real well.

    I guess I shoulda asked first....Does this happen and you can immediately switch to 454 and it works?
    RIDE TALL, SHOOT STRAIGHT AND ALWAYS TELL THE TRUTH

  13. #13
    Member sharksinthesalsa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    wasilla ak
    Posts
    640

    Default 454 works

    yeah i can swithc right over and it works 6 as fast as you can pull the trigger...drop some 45's in and be lucky to shoot 3 finally get them all shot and pust some 454s in six as fast as you can pull the trigger...
    "early to bed, early to rise, fish like hell, and make up lies"

  14. #14

    Default

    Check for primer setback. The 45 LC cases may thin rims, allowing the primer to inch back fractionally after the case opturates, but before pressures peak. With the close tolerances between the rear of the cylinder and the frame, it doesn't take much backout at all to cause it, but once a primer starts dragging it's going to raise cobb with the cylinder rotation, especially in DA. Scratch your thumbnail across the primer on those LC cases, and if it feels anything sticking up past the back of the case, there's your problem.

  15. #15
    Member sharksinthesalsa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    wasilla ak
    Posts
    640

    Default which ones

    the ones that have been fired ?
    "early to bed, early to rise, fish like hell, and make up lies"

  16. #16

    Default

    Roger that.

  17. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    100

    Default thin rims

    Would this be considered a headspace issue?
    Pete

  18. #18

    Default

    Not necessarily, but that's what I'm proposing might be happening due to over-thin rims on the paticular variety of 45LC cases. True headspace sounds like it's within spec for the 454 loads, so I'd expect that to be the case for 45 LC. The fact that it's going on as described makes me think it's a problem with one variety of LC cases, and probably not with others.

    Idle speculation till we learn if there has been primer setback in the LC cases.

  19. #19
    Member sharksinthesalsa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    wasilla ak
    Posts
    640

    Default nothing wrong with the 45 casings

    went through all the ones i had fired and there were none that the primers were sticking out on them abnormally....
    "early to bed, early to rise, fish like hell, and make up lies"

  20. #20

    Default

    Well, you have me stumped then. I'd take it and a sample of fired cases to a good smith, or at least back where you bought it to forward onto Ruger.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •