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Thread: Denali poachers fined, barred from hunting for one year

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    Cool Denali poachers fined, barred from hunting for one year

    Ouch!



    http://newsminer.com/2007/11/06/9732



    Two hunters who poached a bull moose in Denali National Park and Preserve a little more than a year ago were ordered to pay more than $4,000 each in fines and restitution and will be barred from hunting in Alaska for one year.
    The hunters, Delmar Neeley, 55, of Anderson and Robert Maxfield, 23, of Nenana were sentenced in federal district court in Fairbanks last week after being found guilty in an August trial, according to a news release from the National Park Service. They were given, in addition to the monetary penalties and hunting ban, two years probation.

  2. #2

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    They were 2 miles inside the park and didn't know it yet were found with a gps in their possession?? I'd say they got what they deserved.

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    Member jkb's Avatar
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    Default no line

    you mean there is no line on the ground at the park boundary like on google earth?

  4. #4

    Wink Couldn't resist.

    Not trying to hijack the thread but could not resist the opportunity to bring up something I'm starting to see more of just recently from the press. They are starting to use the word "Poacher" in place of "hunter". I have always said that a shopper that steals is no longer a shopper, they are a shoplifter. Someone that forces sex is no longer a partner, they are a rapist. Webster says, "poacher: one who kills or takes wild animals (as game or fish) illegally."

    Back to the article, two miles in with a GPS????????? Guilty!!!!!

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    Member BAR300's Avatar
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    Default hard to judge

    ok, I was there, hunting in the same area (on the right side of the park)when the Feds swooped in with the chopper and picked up a State Trooper and two Federal Park Service cops. Yeah two miles is a bit much, but I've heard of people who hunt the boarder there and without a GPS it is difficult to tell which side you are on. Even with a GPS I've heard of people messing it up, course when they realized they were in the park they got out of there real quick.... My guess is though that these two knew the area and could guess that they were in the wrong.... oh well, less pressure in my area. There were getting to be too many weekenders in there for my liking anyhow.

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    Member BAR300's Avatar
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    Default oh yeah

    the article says that they air lifted the second ATV so as not to damage the tundra, yeah right....wonder what kind of damage the Feds did to the tundra when they rolled that bad boy down the hill and broke the axle, then left it on the trail for three days....smashed to bits... yeah they were really looking out for the tundra Someone got a good deal on a totalled ATV at the federal auction, that much I can tell you... it did have nice Mudzilla 28 inch tires on it though....

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by BAR300 View Post
    the article says that they air lifted the second ATV so as not to damage the tundra, yeah right....wonder what kind of damage the Feds did to the tundra when they rolled that bad boy down the hill and broke the axle, then left it on the trail for three days....smashed to bits... yeah they were really looking out for the tundra Someone got a good deal on a totalled ATV at the federal auction, that much I can tell you... it did have nice Mudzilla 28 inch tires on it though....
    I thought you said you were there? The hunters rolled it down the hill, which is why they were still there next day when the rangers showed up. It was so badly damaged it had to be slung out. The hunters...oops I mean poachers were going to tow it out of the gully with a broken axle (so they said)...that would have left a mark

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    Member fullkurl's Avatar
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    Thumbs down

    Quote Originally Posted by BAR300 View Post
    the article says that they air lifted the second ATV so as not to damage the tundra, yeah right....wonder what kind of damage the Feds did to the tundra when they rolled that bad boy down the hill and broke the axle, then left it on the trail for three days....smashed to bits... yeah they were really looking out for the tundra Someone got a good deal on a totalled ATV at the federal auction, that much I can tell you... it did have nice Mudzilla 28 inch tires on it though....

    What a bunch of garbage.
    Someone couldnt jump on the machine to get it down the hill?
    A clear case of "less is more" with the enforcement mojo...

  9. #9
    Member Dan in Alaska's Avatar
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    I was glassing for bears along the Stampede Trail last October, and I talked with someone from the Park Dept who was out riding that day. He told a story of a couple of "hunters" that shot a moose inside the park a couple of weeks earlier. I don't know if it was the same incident described in the article, but the stories are VERY similar.

    The Park Dept guy said that the 4-wheeler was left on the trail as kind of an F.U. to the "hunters". The Troopers used the helicopter to retrieve it from the gully, but left the busted one on the trail and told the "hunters" to remove it. Evidently, the Troopers seized just about everything from the hunters, but left them the busted wheeler (in the middle of nowhere) since it wasn't worth much anyway.

  10. #10

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    The AK DPS is always reporting they don't have enough Troopers to police the State land and others on this forum have bought into that notion. Now again, we read and hear of the Troopers heavily involved investigating and using helicopters to police the Federal Parks. What is the rationale for this? Some wool is being pulled over our eyes on the whole enforcement process. This is a shining example that should be elevated each and every time, someone says their aren't enough Troopers to do their job. Hogwash.
    As a side note, a year ago, I picked up some maps from the Park Service themselves. I measured the highlighted boundary that was depicited on the map. The highlighted/shaded boundary measured over 15 miles wide, using a rule and the legend on the map. Go Figure.

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    Good morning all,
    Today I'm writing in wearing my work hat -- the one the National Park Service issued me. My day job is the public affairs person for NPS in Anchorage. I'm the guy who sent out the news release from which various newspaper and TV stories originated. Had nothing to do with any TV station's choice of video.

    After further conversation with the Denali NP chief ranger, here are some additional facts on the case:


    The two poachers each had an ATV at the moose kill site. In attempting to retrieve their moose from the base of a hill prior to the arrival on scene of the rangers, they rolled one of their ATV's down the hill, damaging and disabling it. This disabled machine was slung by helicopter back to the Rock Creek trail just outside the park boundary.

    The national park rangers chose this course to eliminate the need for subsequent ATV travel to and from the scene to repair and retrieve the machine, which would have further damaged previously untracked virgin tundra. The poachers were allowed to drive their remaining working machine back to the Rock Creek trailhead.

    Various threads speak to the participation of Alaska State Troopers in this case. The Troopers had no involvement in this case whatsoever; all three officers involved in the case were park rangers assigned to Denali National Park and Preserve. The helicopter involved was contracted for the mission by the National Park Service.

    Hope this helps.
    John Quinley
    Assistant Regional Director, communications

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    Thanks for the clarification Mr Quinley.

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    Member Dan in Alaska's Avatar
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    Default

    Yes, thanks for the clarification.

    FWIW, I am really glad these guys were caught.

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    Member fullkurl's Avatar
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    Default Ditto...

    Thanks for the clarification.

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    Member BAR300's Avatar
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    Default thank you

    I stand corrected. I admit it I was talking out the side of my neck with only half the info. won't happen again.

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    Default

    I remember reading the newsminus article on this when it happened. The point I remember being made was that these guys knew they were in the park. They didn't point out at that time how the "poachers" knew this. I know that on my GPS, I can load different maps onto it which will show the park boundaries among other things. Perhaps these two guys had a similar set up.

    In any case, it is good to see these fellas busted for breaking the rules. Hopefully they have to pay for the cost of the helicopter and any other related costs. What disappoints me is that they only lost their hunting privlidges for one year.

    If you forget to send in a report after not hunting or fishing you lose your privlidges for one year. You would think that willful violatoin of the law would result in more than that.

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