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Thread: on the run?

  1. #1

    Default on the run?

    DO you guys get the rabbits mostly when there on the run. Or do u get some luck and catch them in the open or hidding.

    I am useing a .22 and they can move through those tree! just wondering

  2. #2
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    When they flush whistle at them before you make any quick moves. A lot of times they will stop and look back to see if you are really a threat. I watched my buddy do this several times very effectivly, of course I also saw him pop one in the back of the head at a dead run which is probably the best shot I have witnessed in the field. I personally shelled out the 270 bucks for a Mossberg 500 combo and use the 28 inch barrell with #6. I have killed several through the thick grass on the run when I could barely see them. I will probably switch to my .22 when we get enough snow to knock down the grass. I would like to get a mini14 or AR with the red dot sight cause they are fun to shoot and bunnies offer alot of target without risking the meat.

  3. #3

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    that is why I use a 22 lr instead of a shotgun I want to eat what I kill. I have got one on a run but got beat a lot more. just kind of curious if any one get them in the open or any tricks like the whistle one

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    I have pulled exactly one bb out of the hind legs of the last 5 rabbits I have shot. I always lead them and use the edge of the patern. The couple of other bbs that have gone through the front legs or backstrap all went right through with very little meat damage. But as I said I will probably switch to a rifle when the grass flattens down.

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    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
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    9/10 times it's on the run after I flushed them out. Once in a great while I will spot them hiding before they run.
    Living the Alaskan Dream
    Gary Keller
    Anchorage, AK

  6. #6

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    Can't really comment on hunting rabbits here, but in Missouri I always carried a .22 pistol on my hip and a shotgun. covered all the bases. When I got bored or wanted a little more challenge I slung the shotgun and only used the pistol. Made for a fun trip. I am really looking forward to hunting the hares here. How they taste compared to a cotton tail?

  7. #7

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    sorry but I cant help it a 44 mag is on my side. and wont leave. I have seen moose to bears and have to care a back up with kick

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    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fishkill View Post
    How they taste compared to a cotton tail?
    Taste like chicken
    Living the Alaskan Dream
    Gary Keller
    Anchorage, AK

  9. #9

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    It's rifled barrels for me on sitting shots, smoothbore on running shots. We used to hunt lots with beagles and that was a shotgun-only deal, both because most shooting was on the run and because we didn't want bullets ricochetting through the alders while our dogs were in there- and yes, 22 and larger will ricochet.

    Even owning dogs, it was still fun to leave the dogs home and do some slow snoop hunting with rifles or hanguns, headshots only. Felt guilty when the dogs knew they were being left, but in truth there were plenty of weather days when the dogs weren't going to do any good, but we could still get rabbits on stalks.

    Small shot charges and hitting rabbits with the fringe of the pattern leaves plenty of meat. It's even possible to head shoot (mostly) a sitting rabbit with a shotgun simply by knowing where the edge of the pattern is. You don't aim right at the rabbit, but to one side or above.

    We pass up lots of opportunities on running rabbits with rifled guns, but write it off to a bad job of stalking rather than taking the shot. If you think a shotgun messes up a lot of rabbit, try a body shot with something rifled! I'm just not good enough for head shots on running rabbits, and hats off to anyone who is, along with smiles for anyone who claims they can do it all the time.

  10. #10

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    ok Shotgun makes sense. and can see the differences in the two. thanks

  11. #11
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    I would prefer a head shot every time but there is alot of target behind the front legs that wont waste any meat. I can't imagine anyone trying to eat the ribs. And I agree the terminal balistics of a .22 on bunnies can be a bit shocking and I also carry a smooth bore and a .22 pistol for the best of both worlds.

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    Default still hunting

    I do whats called still hunting, take a few steps, stop, look, and listen then take a few more steps etc. this gets them nervous and they will break their hiding spot and run 10-20 yds and then stop offering a shot. if they're running fast and way out of sight then your moving to fast..........

  13. #13
    Member alaskan winmag's Avatar
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    Default Bring a spotter

    Usually my friend and I go out, him with his shotgun and I have the trusty ol' 22. He has eagle eyes like you wouldn't believe, so I have gotten quite a few just spotting them before they flush. After they flush usually they will only take off for about 15-20 yards before they stop and look around to see if you are coming after them. Thats usually when most of my shots take place. I am going to have to try the whistling technique, that sounds like a great trick.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    I would prefer a head shot every time but there is alot of target behind the front legs that wont waste any meat. I can't imagine anyone trying to eat the ribs. And I agree the terminal balistics of a .22 on bunnies can be a bit shocking and I also carry a smooth bore and a .22 pistol for the best of both worlds.
    Head shot with a .22 after they stall to look back. If I'm grouse hunting, I'll use the shotgun but only if the rabbit helps me out ...sitting still with most of it's body behind a tree for example. And even then, I lead the head and just try to get a couple of pellets into him with the periphery of the shot pattern. I find that rabbits are bloodier than they ought to be and their guts look like a bag of stinkin' mud. Their lungs are tiny and way up front and a hard target to get without risking a gut shot. Rabbit blood makes the meat gamier. Nope ...nice clean head shot is my rule. I use copper (or brass) plated solids in my .22 with good success and no explosive terminal ballistics. I clean the rabbit immediately by slicing down the back and around the neck and aft vent, then peel the skin down to the feet. Cut the feet off, gut it, then cut the head off. When at home, I use kitchen shears to remove blood shot meat that I missed in the field and when in the field, I trim the worst of the blood shot meat off right away (just the mangled stuff that leaves too much blood hanging around.) Just my 2-bits...

    Brian

  15. #15

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    Hey Brian,

    If you want an easier way to clean them, try this:

    Bend each of the feet sideways across your knife blade to snap the bone right above the joint, then "pinch" the break between your thumb and knife to pop off the foot.

    Spin the head till you feel the neck pop and the head is free.

    Make a small cut in the middle of the back, drop your knife, and grab a fistfull of hide in each hand on either side of the cut. Now spread your hands to peel the hide and head completely off.

    Pick up your knife and nip off the tail and any bits of hide that remained, usually at the right where you broke the feet off.

    Tip the head end down so the guts slide forward and out of the way, then cut into the gut cafity right back between the hind legs. Carefully extend the cut toward the guts. then reverse the rabbit so the guts drop and start coming out the cut.

    Now use your knife to split open the rib cage, then use a finger to reach up and pull free the heart, lungs and liver, diaphram and guts.

    Spit the pelvis and pull out the last of the large intestine and get rid of the last pellet or two.

    With practice, this whole operation takes about 30 seconds. Kinda nice when you're hunting with dogs and have a whole pile of rabbits to work. Still nice when you're dressing them right after you shoot them.

    With dogs and lots of rabbits it gets to be a game after a while, seeing how fast you can do it. Our record was two people, 36 rabbits, 12 minutes. One guy was removing head, hide and feet and the other was doing the rest. Really slick, but watch out for airborn gut piles!

  16. #16
    Member Matt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by thunder chicken1 View Post
    I do whats called still hunting, take a few steps, stop, look, and listen then take a few more steps etc. this gets them nervous and they will break their hiding spot and run 10-20 yds and then stop offering a shot. if they're running fast and way out of sight then your moving to fast..........
    Yup, that's how I do it and it's very effective, too.

  17. #17
    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
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    I just walk until I jump one or spot one before it takes off.
    Living the Alaskan Dream
    Gary Keller
    Anchorage, AK

  18. #18
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by thunder chicken1 View Post
    I do whats called still hunting, take a few steps, stop, look, and listen then take a few more steps etc. this gets them nervous and they will break their hiding spot and run 10-20 yds and then stop offering a shot. if they're running fast and way out of sight then your moving to fast..........
    That is the same thing I do but I will weave in tight brush. I will say that it depends on where you hunt. If the area is high preasure they will often bolt and keep on runnin I have seen this a lot up in an area I hunt near sutton. The area I hunt near palmer they never hop far but it is thick so it is hard to get a good clean shot. I will keep using my shotgun untill the grass gets flattened then I will probably switch to the .22. I do keep my.22 pistol on the hip and when I spot them in close it is a fun challenge to switch to it.

  19. #19
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    Thanks, Brown Bear. I'll give your way a try ...sounds easier than mine.

    Brian

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