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Thread: 257 rifle

  1. #1
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    Default 257 rifle

    Looking to buy my nephew a 257 rifle for christmas (just because I always wanted one), and had a question. What, if any, is the difference between a 257 Robets and the 257 Weatherby? I know that Weatherby makes the Vanguard in a 257 Wby Mag, but does anyone else currently produce a rifle for this caliber?

    Thanks much
    BACF3

  2. #2
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    Default

    well from my own personal experience with both, the .257 Weatherby will gain you about 200 FPS more and a much larger ammo bill provided you dont reload. Dont get me wrong, the Weatherby is a fine round and I dont know what you plan on doing with it. My personal choice has been to settle with the .25-06 Remington which has performed flawlessly out to 500 yards and I can get similar ballistics as the Roberts and use all my leftover .30-06 brass to form the cases with. Just my .02....

  3. #3

    Default Devil's advocate

    I would go the opposite direction and spring for the 257 Weatherby.
    Sure the ammo is a little more expensive.
    On the other hand, for about $400 you have a weatherby synthetic that is
    extremely accurate and they even have a great trigger now.

    You can go with a 25-06 or 257 Bob but the 257 Roy will give you a legitimate 400 yard sheep or caribou rifle that won't induce a flinch.

    I believe that 257 Roy will continue to gain in popularity.

    sincerely,

    Thomas

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    Default More details

    Thanks for both inputs, but let me add some details. Nephew is 13 yrs old and will be using the rifle in the flat lands of western Oklahoma for whitetail deer and coyotes (and any other critter that he sees on the farm that shouldn't be there). Not real sure if that makes any difference between the 25.06 or 257 but.......

  5. #5
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Roberts

    I weened myself on a Roberts. Read all the stuff that Jack O'Connor did with it and his loads. It was my first reloading experience and I know I pushed the limits with the old 1917 Mauser made in Ergfurd (Sp) Germany. Hand rubbed linseed oil stock with 5-6 coats. Straight 4X scope. Loved that gun until a layoff forced me to sell the reloading stuff and rifle. Woodchucks were very endangered around the hills near home.

    For deer sized game and elk in the right hands and reasonable yardages, she'll get the job done. But stick with the 115-120 grain bullets.

    Vietnam - June 70 - Feb. 72
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  6. #6

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    For his age and needs, I'd sure go for the 257 Roberts. It's much lower in recoil and noise than either the 25-06 or the 257 Wby, plus it's available in the dandy Ruger Modell 77 Ultralight. I've got two of them, and can't say enough good things about them. I had one already, but picked up the other as a "sweetener" in a larger trade, but couldn't bring myself to part with it.

  7. #7
    Member Dan in Alaska's Avatar
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    Default

    I had a .257 Roberts for several years. I sold it because the Remington short action limited the overall cartridge length too much for my tastes. I miss the "quarter-bore" but I don't miss the short action verison of it. And, if I were to have a long action rifle, I would prefer the faster .25-06 over the Roberts. In fact, I saw two used 700 ADL's in .25-06 this past weekend, and I almost took one home. One was $300 and the other was $350.

    The .257 Wby gets rave reviews from long range hunters and velocity buffs. It's an impressive round, no doubt, but just about everything about it is more expensive. Expensive ammo/brass, more powder, shorter barrel life, etc. If cost is a factor for your nephew, a .25-06 might be a better choice.

    Considering that this rifle is for your 13-year-old nephew, ammo availability might be another consideration. When I owned my Roberts, factory ammo was rather scarce. Wby ammo is very expensive, and maybe even a little harder to find. I don't remember the .25-06 ammo being too difficult find, nor outragiously expensive......a few bucks more than .30-06 or .270 ammo.

  8. #8

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    Go for the Roberts or the 25-06. I have a 257 Roberts and have used it on antelope and coyotes while living in Wyoming. Was a great coyote gun with 75 grain v-max bullets and varget powder. Did fine on antelope with 100 grain hornady's and sierra bullets. I would have bought a 25-06 over the Roberts, but the Roberts was given to me. My dad and brother both shot the barrels out of their Weatherby's (after thousands of rounds). They loved these guns, but also reloaded. I don't see much practical advantage in buying a Weatherby. The ammunition is expensive and a few inches at 400 yards is still a miss if you don't have the ability to shoot that far.

  9. #9

    Default 257

    I have the Ruger Ultralight in the 257 Roberts. In the thirty some odd years that I lived in Nebraska I used everything from the 22 centerfires up to the belted magnums for chasing mule deer and white tails. I finally tried the 257 roberts and fell in love with it. I has low recoil, and it is accurate as can be and seems to work exceptionally well on deer and smaller game animals. You can't go wrong with this rifle for your intended purpose.

  10. #10
    Member Darreld Walton's Avatar
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    Default I LOVE the Roberts round! Well, love is a strong word, but...

    I use it a LOT! No recoil to speak of. It doesn't turn nice meat into inedible bloodshot garbage. It can be used to take animals at ranges that a fella really doesn't have any business shooting at. It can be downloaded with 75 gr. bullets to make a long range varminter that doesn't leave you bashed and bruised at the end of the day. With a quality 115/117/120 gr. bullet, I've seen it cleanly take VERY large mule deer and elk, though there are better elk rounds available. For Whitetails and Antelope, the cartridge is the 'stuff'!
    Downside is that you're going to have to do some shopping for one, as they're not available in every manufacturer's catalog these days. Gun shopping isn't entirely unenjoyable, though, so I figure it's not a problem.
    If nothing else, find an 03 Springfield, or a long action Mauser, and have a barrel put on. Just have the thing set up to take a 120 gr. bullet at full length. An awful lot of them have long magazines and short throats, and it doesn't work out real well.

  11. #11
    Member Big Al's Avatar
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    Default

    Funny how some things workout, and others play catch up. The .257 Roberts is a truly great ctg. When it's AI'd, it really swings. The .25-06 is beyond just overbore capacity for the .257. As a younger and in the days where powder was cheap and that big fireball muzzle flash was cool. I thought the .25-06 was great, of course I also knew that when you sold a used rifle at a show, that the people that looked down a bore seemed to go blind, as long as it was clean, they thought the rifle to be practically "unfired" (you knew you had a live one when they would look down the bore from the muzzle). Even today, with a high dollar bore scope open and in full view, no one ever asks, can they use the scope to look at a bore?

    Yes my vote is for the Roberts, but truth to be told, most folks (like maybe 95%) will never shoot out a rifle anyway. So it's just up to what you think will make you happy.
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

  12. #12

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    257WBY is in a class of it's own. I owned and shot the 25-06 for 10years then went to a 257WBY Mark V and never turned back. I get 3720fps on average with .4MOA and under and some have seen my targets on this forum. The 25-06 can't do what the WBY can and the 100gr TSX makes it an awesome up close and far off deadly round. As I said it is in a class of it's own and handloading it does not cost a lot but cost is not the reason I use it. It is a far better 257. Now I was just told yesterday that my 25-300 will be here the first or second week of Dec. and that will be a 257 with 3674ft pounds of energy with a 100gr TSX at muzzle and still have 1464ft pounds at 600 and only be -6.9 inches low at 500 with a 2.8" high at 100yds. If you don't want a custom like the 25-300 then get the best without a doubt 257 and that is the Weatherby Mark V 257WBY Mag. bar none.
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  13. #13

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    Hyper velocity is over rated. I'd split the difference and go with the 25-06 for your intended purpose. It's still a very fast round and will do the job at long ranges.

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by akav8r View Post
    Hyper velocity is over rated. I'd split the difference and go with the 25-06 for your intended purpose. It's still a very fast round and will do the job at long ranges.
    No body said the 25-06 would not do are that it is not a real killer it truly is but to answer the question of this forum is what is the difference if any between the 257 Roberts and the 257WBY. Now the 25-06 got brought in to the discussion as an option so it is fair game in this post. If hyper velocity is over rated and I am sure you have experience using them to make the above comment, then why don't we all just subscribe to your logic and just use the 257 roberts and not even consider even the 25-06? Why do you want to use the 25-06, because it has speed and reaches out there, and hits harder than the 257 Roberts. I know, I can hear it now "Dead Is Dead"!!! Well of course dead is dead, because anything that is dead is dead. That is not the debate we all agree that dead is dead and there is no difference when something that is dead, it is just dead! The issue is how it dies, not the fact that it died, but how. If all things were equal when you fired the 25-06, same bullet same powder, same everything even hitting the target the way the laws of physics would bear out the fact that the 257WBY is more than the 25-06 and no matter how much more, more is more. Now using your logic I just as well use the 257 Roberts and split the difference between the 25-06 and 256Win mag. No! I would use the 25-06, why? It is faster, flater and hits harder. That is why some choose the 416WBY over the .416 Remington. Will they both kill real well yes, but the .416WBY is faster, flatter and hits harder under same conditions if all things are equal the .416WBY is better. Now can we choose what we want in this great country with a lot of cartridge choices, you bet and amen to that. But a 25-06 is not and never will be a 257WBY mag. and I would choose the 257WBY over the 257Roberts because I want more.
    A GUN WRITER NEEDS:
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    THE HEART OF A CHILD
    THE HIDE OF A RHINOCEROS

  15. #15
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    Default .25-06

    the 24th of last month, Kodiak Alaska, 15 year old boy with his Rem 700 ADL in .25-06, 100 TSX. First shot from 300 yards, no meat damage, beautiful first deer for a kid.
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  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by cubpilot View Post
    the 24th of last month, Kodiak Alaska, 15 year old boy with his Rem 700 ADL in .25-06, 100 TSX. First shot from 300 yards, no meat damage, beautiful first deer for a kid.
    Outstanding, the 100TSX has breathed new life in the likes of the 25-06 and 257WBY, that is all I use in 25cal. the 100gr TSX. Great shot, 300yds is a long ways. Nice, just nice.
    A GUN WRITER NEEDS:
    THE MIND OF A SCHOLAR
    THE HEART OF A CHILD
    THE HIDE OF A RHINOCEROS

  17. #17

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    I guess I should have been more clear. I'm obviously not a fan of pushing the max on velocity. I don't think you gain enough to make it worth it. You get increased recoil, increased muzzle blast, increased ammo cost, increased fouling, decreased case life, and decreased barrel life. That's why I think hyper velocity is over rated. Yes, I know you could say the same thing about a slower .25 as compared to the 25-06, but I think the 25-06 is a good compromise. I agree the .257WBY is in a different velocity class than the other two. The fact is that there is about 4 or 5 inches of difference in trajectory at 400 yards and most people shouldn't be shooting at living things at 300. Don't get me wrong, I'm not saying that longer ranges aren't "doable" under the right circumstances with the right shooter. My point is that a more moderate (albeit still very fast) round is more practical for the vast majority of shooters and applications. BTW, I don't necessarily agree that faster/harder hitting is always "better." That's my opinion and I don't have a problem with people who have a different take on the subject.

  18. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by akav8r View Post
    I guess I should have been more clear. I'm obviously not a fan of pushing the max on velocity. I don't think you gain enough to make it worth it. You get increased recoil, increased muzzle blast, increased ammo cost, increased fouling, decreased case life, and decreased barrel life. That's why I think hyper velocity is over rated. Yes, I know you could say the same thing about a slower .25 as compared to the 25-06, but I think the 25-06 is a good compromise. I agree the .257WBY is in a different velocity class than the other two. The fact is that there is about 4 or 5 inches of difference in trajectory at 400 yards and most people shouldn't be shooting at living things at 300. Don't get me wrong, I'm not saying that longer ranges aren't "doable" under the right circumstances with the right shooter. My point is that a more moderate (albeit still very fast) round is more practical for the vast majority of shooters and applications. BTW, I don't necessarily agree that faster/harder hitting is always "better." That's my opinion and I don't have a problem with people who have a different take on the subject.
    Yes, very well put and I do understand where you are coming from now. Thanks for responding and being more in detail with your comments. Thanks
    A GUN WRITER NEEDS:
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    THE HIDE OF A RHINOCEROS

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    I wouldn't go with the Wby for a 13 yr old. I just don't think it is a beginners gun. It shines (sort of) at distances longer than a young hunter would typically be shooting. It requires a long barrel, while not abusive it may not be conducive to good shooting habits in the hands of a young shooter, and it is expensive even to reload. Brass for it is expensive!

    Back to the (sort of) thing above. While it is very fast and designed for long range shooting, it just doesn't buck the wind all that well over 300 yards. It does well beyond 300 yards in experienced hands that can compensate for the wind drift. Shooting less than 300 it has no great advantage over various other rounds.

    On the other hand I think there are better choices than the Roberts. The 25s just don't have a lot of variety in bullets. Why not something along the lines of a 7-08? I like the heavier bullet selection for the wind.

  20. #20
    Member Big Al's Avatar
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    Gee Ed, do you really think that heavy makes a difference in the wind? I think length is more of a factor along with shape. I also think that what makes for a great bullet to help cancel some wind drift does not necessarily make a great game bullet.

    Boat-tails with a seven or more ojive are great bullets in the wind and for long range, they just ain't my choice for shooting at things I'm going to eat.
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

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