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Thread: what does linotype look like

  1. #1
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    Default what does linotype look like

    I have a bunch of those sheets that newspapers use to print, on the used ones you can see the print, a lot of trappers use it for roofing ect, is this linotype?? i am just starting to cast bullets for my 45/70 and any info would be helpful.

  2. #2

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    Sure sounds like linotype for me. Can't imagine using it for roofing, but I love it for bullets, whether cast straight or used for making my own alloys. It's getting hard to come by, so I'd sure think about using it mostly for making alloys by mixing with more readily available lead sources, reserving the pure stuff for your hottest loads. No need to shoot hot loads all the time, and by alloying for softer bullets and dropping the velocity for practice, you can stretch your supply of linotype for along time.

  3. #3

    Default not linotype

    Actually those are later types of very thin flat metal plates used for cold printing, with the images and letters lightly printed on them. These came way after linotype letter molds were invented. These are thin precise "bars" of linotype metal cast inside the linotype machine during the printing process. It is a complicated process that revolutionized the printing process.
    Linotype is a combination of lead, tin and antimony in specific percentages to make a quick hardening material hard enough to be used for printing. It is very hard and brittle, needing extra lead to soften it up for making good bullets for easier obturation in the barrel and to prevent bullet break up against bone when used in hunting.
    Tin causes lead to harden more quickly, making casting more efficient and antimony is needed to allow lead and tin to mix well together.

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    Member Big Al's Avatar
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    There are six different types of Linotype I have nearly 2,000 pounds of the stuff here at the shop. To look at it I can not tell the difference. The temperature it melts at is the only way I know to get a close idea of what you are dealing with. Printers type most common is 12-4-84, when you cut with pure lead at the rate of 50/50 you have the perfect magnum bullet alloy for pistol bullets at 50/50 this is 6-2-92.

    This link will help you, I believe.


    http://www.lasc.us/HeatTreat.htm

  5. #5

    Default Linotype

    Big Al knows his stuff. But the last ratio would be 6-2-42, a typo, I'm sure (no pun intended 8*)) The ratio is lead-tin-antimony. Even the last ratio given is twice the antimony percentage in wheelweights.

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    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Actually, Al's numbers are correct and it is antimony-tin-lead on your percentage breakdown (they should add up to 100% if they are right).
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  7. #7

    Default ?

    I just acquired some ingots that I was told were linotype. About 2ft long, 4-5" wide, flar on bottom rounded on top. Heavy as all get out. Lino type? The guy just casts it as is for his large bore rifle. Sound like linotype?

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    Member .338-06's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bearheart View Post
    I just acquired some ingots that I was told were linotype. About 2ft long, 4-5" wide, flar on bottom rounded on top. Heavy as all get out. Lino type? The guy just casts it as is for his large bore rifle. Sound like linotype?
    Sounds like linotype "pigs". Linotype was cast into pigs for storage and handling then cast into the strips.

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    Member RANGER RICK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by yukon254 View Post
    I have a bunch of those sheets that newspapers use to print, on the used ones you can see the print, a lot of trappers use it for roofing ect, is this linotype?? i am just starting to cast bullets for my 45/70 and any info would be helpful.
    I have found most of the Linotype I get is eiter in letterpress and or Pigs.
    Here is a couple pic's of both forms .

    RR


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    Default thanks not lino

    Thanks guys my stuff is not linotype, it doesnt look like the stuff rick has must be tin or sheet metal.

  11. #11
    Member Big Al's Avatar
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    Post pictures so we can all share in the fun of, guess what?
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

  12. #12
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    The Fairbanks Daily News Minus used to sell these sheets They called them aluminum press plates. I never held any, but I have no reason to argue with them.

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    Default

    They are likely aluminum. They used to show up on lots of farm buildings here in SE Sask.

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