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Thread: Reloading help

  1. #1
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    Default Reloading help

    I would like to start learning to Reload, specifically for .223, then .45ACP and .40 S&W and who knows what else later. However, I am completely lame to the world of reloading. walking around Sportsman's looking there doesn't help much. Any recommendations on books or starter kits, gear to get? Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by AKMARINE View Post
    I would like to start learning to Reload, specifically for .223, then .45ACP and .40 S&W and who knows what else later. However, I am completely lame to the world of reloading. walking around Sportsman's looking there doesn't help much. Any recommendations on books or starter kits, gear to get? Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.
    Go to Sierra's web page and other bullet or powder manufactures page and you can read or buy material to begin your journey.
    A GUN WRITER NEEDS:
    THE MIND OF A SCHOLAR
    THE HEART OF A CHILD
    THE HIDE OF A RHINOCEROS

  3. #3
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    Default Those kits might not have everything.

    Get a manual first.
    Read it, and then get the loading tools.

    Youíll need

    Dies for each cartridge.
    The dies for the 223 (Get a 2 die rifle set) will be different than the

    Dies for the 45 ACP, and 40 S&W (A 3 die set or a 4 die set.) For auto pistol cartridges you will need a Taper Crimp die. For pistol cartridges, you can get Carbide dies that donít require lubrication when sizing.

    Case lube

    Press

    Primer seater, (There might be one on the press.)

    Primer pocket cleaner, (You could use a small screwdriver)

    Dial Caliper, or some way to gauge case length

    Case trimmer, or some way to trim case necks (A file will suffice, but itís not a good idea)

    Chamfer tool to smooth the case necks after trimming (You could get by with a pocket knife.)

    Powder scale

    Powder measure, (You could get along without it.)

    Powder funnel

    Something to wipe off case lube, (Rag??)

    Learn the function of each tool, (from the manual)
    how to adjust each type of die, (from the manual or die instructions)
    how to use loading data,
    keep it simple at the beginning, and (to one cartridge) (Simple tools) Single press, etc.

    And of course you will need components. Get that from the loading data.
    Choose the
    Powder,
    Primer, (Size, small rifle, large rifle, small pistol, large pistol, (Standard or Magnum)

    After this you will be able to ask specific questions.

    I hope I didnít forget something really important, like safety considerations, both for loading and the loaded rounds.

    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  4. #4
    Member Darreld Walton's Avatar
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    Default Simplicity is key!

    If you haven't picked up any equipment yet, investigate one of the kitted outfits like the RCBS. In them are included all the basic equipment that you will need to reload one cartridge. I believe they still include a Speer manual in them, or did. In the front of the major reloading manuals is a wealth of information, with pictures, on what you need to do, and the sequence for doing it. After that, the tough part is trying to figure out what powder/primer/bullet combination you want to use, and what target velocity you want to achieve....later on, you can add the Fru-Fru stuff.

  5. #5
    Member Big Al's Avatar
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    Default

    Do not buy a new reloading press, go to the gun shows to buy used equipment. I pay on the average 75.00 for an RCBS Rock chucker at the shows, I have four of them (because I swage bullets), you only need one press. Buy a set of 1010 scales. Look around for used dies.

    I recommend this book above all others. You might as well learn the correct way from the start. Get this book and read it through before you start buying equipment.


    http://www.sinclairintl.com/cgi-bin/...845&type=store

  6. #6

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    Lots of the mystery will disappear if you sit at the bench with a good reloader. Watch and ask questions, and it will make sense pretty quickly. I'd have an experienced reloader on hand the first time you run your own gear, too. Just makes life easier all around.

  7. #7
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    Thumbs up

    Lots of really good and right on suggestions so far. Smitty gave you a great gear list. Al gave an idea to keep the costs down. Dareld suggested the starter kits, and Bear suggested a mentor. These are all good ideas.

    When I first started handloading, I went the starter kit route (RCBS). I didn't have a mentor (wish I had), and over the many years since, I have added more and better equipment. That approach has worked just fine for me because I primarily reload rifle rounds and large caliber pistol. I am mostly interested in quality, not quantity (I shoot often, but I am not a high volume shooter). Therefore, I still use the single stage press from my original starter kit, and I have never felt the need to trade up to a progressive press...do you know the difference? If you are interested in reloading for high volume shooting, which is suggested by the calibers you selected, then you may want to think about single stage Vs progressive.

    All of that said, I think the best idea you've gotten so far is to not buy anything right now, and find someone who will show and teach. Then you can make some decisions about purchases. Ask the range master where you shoot to give you some names of people who would be good mentors. Lastly, reloading is expensive, and I don't care what anyone says, the cost savings are not huge...especially in the begining. However, I don't reload to save money (although I'm sure I have and do). I reload because it is very rewarding, relaxing and fun. Why do you want to reload?

    ...and semper fi (I was in the Marines as well).

  8. #8
    Member 8x57 Mauser's Avatar
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    Default Keep it simple

    Doc, Doc, Doc...

    Only the FIRST round you reload is expensive - a couple of hundred bucks, maybe.

    After that, they're really cheap.

    Anyway, the only advice I can add to the good stuff posted already, is to be sure you don't get really fancy at the outset. I started without a mentor on hand, and had myself half convinced I'd need to neck-turn my cartridges and gauge them for concentricity, plus be prepared to anneal necks before I got started.

    A phone call or two with my Dad calmed me down - the basics aren't all that tough, or fancy. Don't skip basic steps or safety inspections, but you don't have to debur flash holes or uniform primer pockets unless you feel like it. And there's really no reason to feel like it 'till you've got the basics down.

    Have fun!

  9. #9
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    Red face

    ...I knew I was going to catch it for the cost savings comment...I could feel it coming as I typed my earlier response. This is a great forum with good folks on it...very kindly done Mauser.

  10. #10
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 8x57 Mauser View Post
    Doc, Doc, Doc...

    Only the FIRST round you reload is expensive - a couple of hundred bucks, maybe.

    After that, they're really cheap.

    Anyway, the only advice I can add to the good stuff posted already, is to be sure you don't get really fancy at the outset. I started without a mentor on hand, and had myself half convinced I'd need to neck-turn my cartridges and gauge them for concentricity, plus be prepared to anneal necks before I got started.

    A phone call or two with my Dad calmed me down - the basics aren't all that tough, or fancy. Don't skip basic steps or safety inspections, but you don't have to debur flash holes or uniform primer pockets unless you feel like it. And there's really no reason to feel like it 'till you've got the basics down.

    Have fun!
    8x57:
    And that's a fact, or facts actually.
    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

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