Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Pros/Cons of Flatbottom over SemiV

  1. #1

    Default Pros/Cons of Flatbottom over SemiV

    After looking around I have about decided that what I need is a 18-20' alumninum boat. I am inclinded to go with a prop over the jet as we just don't get the skinny water here that you guys have in AK. If it is skinny enough to need the jet then it is likely to narrow and rockie to manuver the jet in. We also have alot of riverweed and grass and whatnot which it seems jets really do not like. However, due to weight capacity and stability I am looking at a flatbottom or semi-v. What are the pros/cons of each type? Are there big differences in handling, fuel consumption, weight capacity, stability?

    Any information would be appreciated.

  2. #2
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    Pro's of the flatbottom would be running shallower water, but that only applies with a jet which you aren't running. It would be a little bit more stable at rest in smooth water. It should be slightly more fuel efficient (only in calm water you'll be able to stay at cruise speed in rougher water with the V) and for all out speed a flat bottom will have an edge, in smooth water.

    Pro's, in the real world water is almost never calm, and a semi-v will have a much smoother ride in chop. The hull will tend to roll more smoothly with waves from the side at rest, but that is primarily due to flared sides and reserve boyancy vs bottom configuration.

    IMHO, the only reason to run a flatbottom is for shallow water performance, or for a race boat. Other then that the semi V is the way to go.

    Oh, almost forgot, while a flatbottom can run shallower water, if you manage to get stuck in a muddy silty area, you have a large surface area to get unstuck, vs the V hull. Also easier to get logs under the V to get it unstuck.

  3. #3
    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    4,670

    Default

    Paul H covered everything in his post.

    Where are you planning on running your boat?

  4. #4

    Default

    So far all of my use has been on local lakes (Waldo, Prineville Res.) and the Deschutes River and Siuslaw. I plan to branch out to other lakes and rivers here in Oregon. I recently got bitten by the fishing bug so I am starting to figure out where to go.

    I appreciate the feedback. I figured the semi-v was better all around but it is nice to get the confirmation.

    To be honest price will drive the boat I get as much as anything. Basically I am trying to figure out my ideal set up. Then I will be looking for a used boat that matches my criteria the closest.

  5. #5
    Member akrstabout's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    2,292

    Default Paul covered it well

    so allI can say is go with the deepest V you can for what you will be running. My boat, custom made, has a 10* deadrise and then the bow comes to a 40* angle. It cuts big water in the ocean just fine. Chop kills me though sometimes. But I have ran 2 rivers, Kenai & Kasilof. Was in 2 feet of water at the shallowest. So too deep of a V gets you too deep in the water for some rivers. Then pay attention to how the motor is installed. Some motors are set too deep, which hurts your performance and fuel consumtion. Plus more likely to hit or drag your motor. But you will like the V, especially if going on lakes. Plus go with the bigger of the two boats. You will wish you had anyways just do it now.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •