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Thread: Quick question

  1. #1
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    Talking Quick question

    I'm trying to design my own snow plow, trying to save some money. I've already got the blade built and now I'm working on the mount. I have a 2007 700EPS grizzly,and I went to the yamaha dealer in palmer/wasilla this weekend to get some ideas for a mount and seen that they were pretty much hooked on by U-bolts to the bottom of the frame. Well getting to the question, the guy at the dealership said I wanted to be careful and not bend the frame, but if its hooked up by only U-bolt hows this not going to bend the frame? There is a site (SwisherInc.com) that has a universal plow mount that hooks up to the ball hitch on the back of the atv and goes under the atv to hook up to the A-arms, but on the 700 I have no holes on the A-arm to hook it up to. So my other question is were to hook the mount up to so I want have the side to side movement, without bending the frame. Thanks alot for listening and any help wold be awesome!

  2. #2
    Member AKGUPPY's Avatar
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    Jun 2007
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    Default

    Check this thread out. There's a guy giving one away.
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ad.php?t=20188

  3. #3
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    Default

    He is giving away the plow and push tubes, not the mount. I have already made the plow but the mount is were I'm stumped. Thanks though.

  4. #4
    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
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    Oct 2005
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    Wasilla, Alaska, United States
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    Default

    Could you just weld a mounting point to a piece of plate and then bolt it to your skid plate? (that sounded confusing...)

    How are you planning on connecting your push arms? Are you just going to bolt/pin them to a bracket like a piece of C channel? If so, just weld the piece of channel to a larger piece of plate (to spread out the surface area) and then bolt the assembly to your skid plate. When winter is over, just take the assembly off for the summer.

    If you could post a pic of the plow it might be easier to brainstorm ideas.
    AKmud
    http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j96/AKmud/213700RMK1-1.jpg


    The porcupine is a peacful animal yet God still thought it necessary to give him quills....

  5. #5

    Smile What's wrong with this idea?

    http://www.cyclecountry.com/Manuals/15-xxxx/15-5511.pdf

    I don't know why you are afraid of bending the frame. The frame is the strongest part of the machine, so you want to use it to do the toughest work. You are not dozing trees, just pushing snow. Most blade assemblies have a spring/shock system built into them so they can absorb some direct impact without doing damage. Did you build yours that way? You will most likely be pushing snow at a slow speed and once you have a good flat hard surface to work with you can increase your speed somewhat. You need to be sure there aren't any obstructions under the snow like stumps, etc. If you are going slow and hit something solid, it will stop you dead in your tracks, but if you have your plow assemby attached similar to the link I provided you, I wouldn't be at all concerned with bending a machine frame. I have a cycle country plow and mounting kit for my machine, it has been very durable and I have not broke or bent anything major as long as I am using it for its intended use. It is not a dozer, just an ATV with a snow blade.

  6. #6
    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default Mounting

    I recently got a Cycle Country plow from a guy who had run it on a '90 something King Quad. I have an '01 KQ. It came with no mounting, and had been manual lift, so what I did was take a piece of steel strut material (you know, the U-shaped stuff with lots of holes in the back meant to fasten pipe and other stuff to walls and ceilings) and welded two plates on either end the width of the plow tubes mounting ears, then drilled a hole in each plate to accept the plow tube mounting ears. Next I mounted the strut material onto the bottom of the frame right in front of the foot pegs using U-bolts (drilled right through the skid plate). I used pins to mount the plow tubes to the ears, and turned my attention to how to raise and lower it. I mounted a low-class Champion winch on a piece of 1/4" aluminum plate and hung a pulley under the front rack. I threaded the cable through the pulley, and secured it to an eye at the top of the blade using cable clamps. Raises and lowers fine. I banded the rinky-dink controller to a convenient location using cable ties and, wallah, ready for snow. Total price including new winch and hardware: $210.

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