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Thread: Questions About Getting PPL

  1. #1

    Default Questions About Getting PPL

    I just ordered the Gleim PPL software. Soon after I get started I'll be looking for a CFI close to the Wasilla area, but I have a few questions.

    I hear that by far the best way to train is to buy an airplane and get trained in it. Mainly cause this forces you to make more time for flying. Also you get used to flying your own plane. However, being that I am so new to flying and basically don't really know what to look for in a plane it would make it tough. Seems to me it would be better to have a CFI already established that I might help me pick out a plane that is a decent deal and also one that he would be comfortable teaching me in. Basically since he knows what he's looking for. Am I wrong? What might you guys suggest about that plan.

    Secondly are there any CFIs in the wasilla area that I could meet up with and go for an introductory flight. Then help me spend my money on a decent training plane, such as a champ or a 150 or something along those lines???

    Anyway help would be greatly appreicated.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Member Toddler's Avatar
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    Default

    Talk to Gary at Mustang Air in Palmer, he is a very good instructor.

    As for the airplane question, it will be a bit more driven by what you can afford and what you like. For example if you like tandem high wing tail dragger aircraft with a stick instead of a yoke then you might look at a Husky, Cub, or a Citabria. They all have similar performance (don’t jump on my guys I’m making a point) but the $$$ is huge.

    I would suggest that you define what your needs are. Who is going to fly? You, you and the spouse, you the spouse and kid(s)? Do you want to be able to carry lots of “stuff”? Are you going to do “off airport” work? High/low wing? Yoke or a stick? Side by side or tandem? How much can you spend? (purchasing the plane is only the initial cost think about annuals, and incidental maintenance and insurance is you choose to carry it). Once you have answered these questions you will have a better idea of what airplane you are looking for. My $0.02

    Drew

  3. #3
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    Default Bill Billingsly

    I flew with Bill a couple of weeks ago, when I purchased my champ and needed a insurance checkout of 2 hours. He was a great guy and has been instructing since the 1950's when he was a teen. He also flys out of Mustang Air and was willing to slip me in on a sunday out at wasilla airport. Once you decide what you purpose will be there are many checklist that can take some of the nightmares out of the purchase process. I think at work I have a good own, but this link will give you an idea of the things you need to do.
    http://www.theplaneexchange.com/how/1.html
    I have found during my instrument rating that you need a instructor that will be around and is not a time builder and just as important is an istructor that can meet you schedule. Good luck

    Terry

  4. #4

    Default About the plane I would like to get?

    I would like to keep the cost of the plane under $35K if at all possible. I believe that I would usually be flying myself and one other person and maybe an additional 100 pounds of gear. Mainly use it as a commuter from Wasilla up to Cantwell where our cabin is. As far as yoke vs. stick I guess I don't know. Whichever is easier to learn on would probably be the one I'd jump on. However, costs may dictate that. I do know I want a tail dragger though. As far as annuals and whatnot I freely admit I do not know how much they cost which is another reason I need to find a CFI cause I have about a million Qs, but don't think that asking them all on the forum would be the ticket. I'll check out Mustang Air in Palmer when I get off the slope. Any additional help in regards to the type of aircraft I would end up with for around 35K as well as comments on yoke vs. stick.

  5. #5
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    Default

    I started flying in the mid-70s with C-150s and C-172s, then stopped, then again in the 80s, then stopped, then again.

    Finally I went nuts and bought an old beater PA-12 that cost me $200 per month to the credit union.
    I flew the heck out of that plane and obtained my license without quiting again. Although I had to rent a C-150 for my check ride because of my crappy instruments, it was no big deal...

    Having a few old timers help out with showing you how to maintain your plane (AND LOG BOOKS) goes a long way to making you a better pilot.
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
    http://site.dragonflyaero.com

  6. #6
    Member AK-HUNT's Avatar
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    Default inputs

    A CFI is probably not the best source for finding a good deal on an aircraft. Find an IA somewhere who knows his stuff and ask. There are some citabrias under 40k but not many. What's important is engine times and such when buying a plane.
    A real good priced airplane with an engine that costs lots of $$$$ to rebuild is a terrible deal. Mechanics are more likely to know these details. Don't misread......there are probably 1000 CFI's who can find deals but the pre-buy inspection is done by........the mechanic.
    By the way there's a white citabria with a very low time motor at kenai for sale you may be able to get near your price range.

    Good luck and if you do the math you will save 1000's of dollars buying your own before you start flying.

  7. #7
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    Default

    One of my students is selling his 57 C-172. It is mid time but very clean. It still has the C-145 (0-300) engine. He would probaly take something in the high 20s since he has the float plane bug now.
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
    http://site.dragonflyaero.com

  8. #8
    Member Toddler's Avatar
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    A 172 is very good GP plane. It is a very stable and forgiving. Usually offers a fair instrument capabilities if you want continue your training (you should – and you need to get some spin/stall training too). Its not a tail dragger but neither is the 206 and that is a great bush plane! Just my $0.02

    Drew

  9. #9
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    Default i agree

    I am a CFII with 12k+ of ak flight time, and I still go to my mechanic when I am looking for an airplane. Find a good mechanic, thats what ya need. just like AK hunt said. I am a CFII, and I fly for the big boys out of international, and teach out of birchwood in my spare time. Toddler has a great option with a 172. get that, fly the motor off of it, and put a 180hp in it, and you will have plenty of fun. But flying a tailwheel is fun too. Trust me, I bet toddler can put that 206 places that would amaze you, they are great airplanes!

  10. #10

    Default

    I have a PA-22 Pacer for sale that would be a great trainer and allow you to grow into it to do some off airport if you wanted. Follow the advice of others though do talk to a IA, or other plane owners to give you advice but if you want to check out my plane or ask other people about it you can find more info on aeroalaska.com

    Deploying overseas shortly thats why I'm selling, asking 28K.

    http://www.aeroalaska.com/viewad.asp...01230002100325

  11. #11

    Default

    I would third Mr. Billingsley.

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