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Thread: Winter Parkas???

  1. #1
    Member AggieHunter's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Winter Parkas???

    Moving to alaska this january.
    Just wondering what parkas/jackets you guys use in the winter months.
    I'll be living in anchorage and working on the slope.

    Gortex?? Is there a material that is better/comparable to gortex??
    synthetic or down insulation??
    l.l.bean? Marmot? Cabelas? Canada Goose?

    What works and what doesnt work?

    thanks guys and gals

  2. #2
    Member BucknRut's Avatar
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    Default My Carhartts aren't really pretty

    ...for a reason! Maybe it's the nature of them that I like. If you are looking strictly for work, I'm not sure there is a better way to go. I am still making rags out of my existing carhartts, but might try out the "Extreme" stuff when I need to replace. I like wearing bibs and jacket most, but the coveralls have there place and are better for some conditions in my opinion. The slopers will likely have a better idea of what to look for.

  3. #3
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Default

    Each person has their preferences, but where it all begins for me is with layers. You'll see temperatures from 40 above to 40 below (and colder on the slope), so one jacket will not do it all.

    As for me, I start with a windstopper fleece underlayer. I then have two different shells that I use depending on the conditions - a 3-ply goretex shell with no insulation for when it is above -10, and a thicker shell with synthetic insulation for when it drops below -10. I also have a softshell for when it is above 30 degrees.

    My personal preference on brands are either Arcteryx or Marmot, but other good brands include Helly Hansen, Mountain Hardware, The North Face, Sierra Designs, and more.

    Don't pay full price. There are enough sales out there to make it worth your while to look. I almost always find great deals at www.sierratradingpost.com

  4. #4
    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Default

    Just FYI... for the slope work, you should be issued appropriate flame-retardant arctic gear (exact gear will depend on company and job). For milling about Anchorage, you shouldn't need much once you get climatized. Beyond that, it all depends on what kind of activities you'll be engaged in while outdoors. Every winter sport has a different clothing preferrence. There are plenty of good outdoor gear stores in Anchorage, so you might be just as well to buy locally once you're here.

  5. #5
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    Default work or play?

    For either, I like bibs and a coat. I do not like 1 piece coveralls. They are way too restrictive. It is also too hard to try and cool down if you start building up heat. Like the other guys said, dress in layers. You can have several different sets of outers. I like either Carhartt or Refrigewear for working, trapping, cutting wood, and getting dirty. They clean up pretty good and the outer layer is durable. You can bet both in tops and bottoms.
    In Fairbanks, Value Village often has pretty good used stuff cheap. I bought a big down parka last winter for $30.00. They always have tons of fleece jackets and vests. Usually a good selection of long underwear too. Not sure where to go in Anchor town for the same type of deals.
    There are not a lot of garage sales in the winter, but that is a good place to look. Also don't forget going to the Salvation Army.
    If you like to spend money, there are lots of top end places that will be happy to open their doors for you.

  6. #6
    Member alaska bush man's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Down

    Down by far,,,,,is this best , but do not get it wet! Northern Face also has nice parkas
    Alaska

  7. #7
    Member BucknRut's Avatar
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    Default sorry, I was a little narrow-minded on my answer

    Guess I was thinking for work only, I wouldnít consider using carhartts for hunting or play, and donít usually wear for casual dress either. I talked to a few guys who work on the slope and they considered Carhartts to be the norm, but to check with your company for specifics that you might need to adhere to.

    As for casual, Iíll second what Brian Said. However, I donít wear my windstopper gear as my first layer. Iíve always worn a fleece layer first, then windstopper, then outer layer. Maybe I am doing something wrongÖ Brian, could you expand on your reasoning?

  8. #8
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BucknRut View Post
    However, I donít wear my windstopper gear as my first layer. Iíve always worn a fleece layer first, then windstopper, then outer layer. Maybe I am doing something wrongÖ Brian, could you expand on your reasoning?
    Nope - your method is even better, and I do that as well if it is truly cold. I don't find the need for 3 layers very often, but a pile fleece is better than windstopper fleece for insulation. Sounds like good advice to me.

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