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Thread: What are the Trout hitting on in the Lakes Right now?

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    Member liv2fish87's Avatar
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    Default What are the Trout hitting on in the Lakes Right now?

    Im about to make a trip to 1 of the lakes up there by big lake and had been wondering what setups ppl were using. im gonna be going out there with an ultralight spinning rod, figured id just throw some panther martins on there and try my luck.. any advice? anything will help ..... even other hot spots? or methods!!?

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    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    try a panther martin or an olive wooly bugger with some split shot in front of it.
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default Eggs...

    ... single, under a bobber. If you can get through the skift of ice that is!

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    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    worms and popcorn shrimp make a far superior lake fishing bait if you are into killing trout... Lakes are the place to kill trout for sure especially stocked ones.
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default Kill!!!!!

    Kill trout! kill trout! Kill trout!

    Why else would one freeze their butt off?

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    Default big lake is a wild fish lake

    Quote Originally Posted by ak_powder_monkey View Post
    worms and popcorn shrimp make a far superior lake fishing bait if you are into killing trout... Lakes are the place to kill trout for sure especially stocked ones.
    Might want to target the stocked lakes if you just want to fry up a batch.

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    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sayak View Post
    Kill trout! kill trout! Kill trout!

    Why else would one freeze their butt off?
    I don't ice fish for a reason trout taste fairly bad imo
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  8. #8
    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Prepare them correctly

    Quote Originally Posted by ak_powder_monkey View Post
    I don't ice fish for a reason trout taste fairly bad imo
    Trout are great smoked.

    Trout taste superb when rolled in seasoned flour and fried in a mixture of butter and bacon grease on a very hot skillet. Finger lickin' good. Try it with a small dolly Monkey. You won't be disappointed.

  9. #9

    Default Speaking of trout...

    Are they better tasting out of the lakes as compared to the rivers?
    Before the reds start really running, we usually fish for rainbows on the Kenai and keep a legal one too eat once in while. We just fry them in butter, salt, pepper and they taste great. Head, gut the fish and fry the whole thing in a pan, and the bones all come out easily.
    Another question, it seems to be that keeping rainbows and not releasing them on the Kenai is taboo; why is that? I realize the Kenai is a wild, trophy rated river and the rainbows could be wiped out by indescriminate killing, but it seems that they literally blanket the river by numbers and can be caught by anyone. It's not unusual for us to get a 28" or bigger by accident.
    They fish seem to proliferate anywhere they are found, just wondering why lot's of anglers seem to almost place them on the endangered species list.
    Just curious and need to be educated,
    Jim

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by sayak View Post
    Trout taste superb...and fried in a mixture of butter and bacon grease on a very hot skillet.

    What doesn't?
    "The Gods do not subtract from the allotted span of men's lives the hours spent in fishing" Assyrian Tablet 2000 B.C.

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    Member liv2fish87's Avatar
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    Default well

    big jim, if you look at all the other fisheries that have been abused, they arent as heavily populated as the kenai with these fish. im glad that there are those laws on the kenai that way it is preserved for my kids, and there kids to come...30 yrs ago fishing was probably 10xs what it is now anywhere... i dont know, ive seen people do screwed up **** to fish for no reason, people catching trout just cutting off all their fins... then releasing them. so im glad there is atleast 1 place that is heavily watched and protective over these GREAT fish..... nothing puts a smile on your face like a rainbow trout making its fierce runs. no better feeling in the world!!! oh and btw pmonkey... i have no intentions of just going to a lake to catch them and kill them to make them my dinner... salmon are the only fish kept by me to eat.



    educated???

  12. #12
    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default You don't need no education!

    Quote Originally Posted by Big Jim View Post
    Are they better tasting out of the lakes as compared to the rivers?
    Before the reds start really running, we usually fish for rainbows on the Kenai and keep a legal one too eat once in while. We just fry them in butter, salt, pepper and they taste great. Head, gut the fish and fry the whole thing in a pan, and the bones all come out easily.
    Another question, it seems to be that keeping rainbows and not releasing them on the Kenai is taboo; why is that? I realize the Kenai is a wild, trophy rated river and the rainbows could be wiped out by indescriminate killing, but it seems that they literally blanket the river by numbers and can be caught by anyone. It's not unusual for us to get a 28" or bigger by accident.
    They fish seem to proliferate anywhere they are found, just wondering why lot's of anglers seem to almost place them on the endangered species list.
    Just curious and need to be educated,
    Jim
    I mostly fish the lakes that have wild char, dollies and rainbows on the Tustumena, Moose and Swanson drainages.

    I think most of the C&R hype is from guides who don't want to jeopardize their bread and butter. Maybe return the really big boys and don't be greedy and it's all good.

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    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    Oh I eat dollies, dollies are char not salmon and in a lot of places there are tons of them, I also have been know to eat lake trout and even rainbows, I just think stocked rainbows taste to much like Farmed Salmon...

    Catch and Release is very important for high pressured areas like the kenai parks highway and bristol bay, For instance the russian river rainbow population was almost destroyed because people kept lots of fish with the implementation of catch and release rules the fishery has rebounded to the point where you can find some of the best rainbow fishing in the world within three hours of Anchorage. C&R is not hype it is an ethic that has made it possible for sport fishing to grow to the size it is today, without catch and release fishing there would be very little trout fishing in this country as there would be very little trout left in this country.

    Most lakes on the other hand receive very little pressure and have pretty large populations of fish relative to rivers thus they are the places to fish if you want to eat trout, you'll notice that regulations are liberalized in lakes.
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  14. #14
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Jim View Post
    Another question, it seems to be that keeping rainbows and not releasing them on the Kenai is taboo; why is that? I realize the Kenai is a wild, trophy rated river and the rainbows could be wiped out by indescriminate killing, but it seems that they literally blanket the river by numbers and can be caught by anyone. It's not unusual for us to get a 28" or bigger by accident.
    Because they were decimated in the Russian River foretunately people thought you couldn't catch rainbows in the milky waters of the kenai. I choose to catch and release wild rainbows 99% of the time unless I hook it in such a way that the fish is going to die if I realease it and its legal to keep, which has not happened to me since I started fly fishing. But that is because I enjoy sport fishing and I enjoy matching wits with rainbows and want to make sure that future generations can do the same.
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default Say what!

    Quote Originally Posted by ak_powder_monkey View Post
    ... I enjoy matching wits with rainbows ....
    Gotta say, that really tickles my funny bone!

    You may be young but don't cut yourself short there, AkPM.

  16. #16

    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by ak_powder_monkey View Post
    Because I enjoy matching wits with rainbows and want to make sure that future generations can do the same.
    Monkey: How many times or how often do you have to be outwitted by them, to ensure their survial for the future generations? Does it happen often enough?

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    Default why I don't eat many trout from lakes

    I caught this rainbow today in a lake in the valley. I was fly fishing and I ususually don't kill the trout, but this one was hooked deep. I unhooked it as carefully as I could, but it was bleeding and a few moments later it went belly up. So I took it home to eat. I am not going to eat it though. I took several pictures and I'll send them to ADF&G and I put the fish in the freezer in case they want it to study.

    Interesting that this fish won't spawn for several months, but already has fairly well-developed roe. This fish was 19" long.

    This fish had parasites like you see on it's tail on its anal fin, and also on its gills. Other than those external parasites, the fish seemed to be healthy on the outside and it fought well. I've caught many fish in valley lakes that had these external parasites. Hopefully they don't all look like this one on the inside. Yuck.

    By the way, I caught it on a scud pattern.
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