Results 1 to 16 of 16

Thread: Xtratuf Insulated

  1. #1

    Default Xtratuf Insulated

    Do these make a good winter boot? What temperature are they good down to before you need to start adding warm socks? Thanks.

  2. #2
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Eagle River/ Juneau
    Posts
    5,154

    Default

    yes they make a decent winter boot if you are in a wet environment (SEAK, Kodiak, PWS) if you are in fairbanks or something they don't.
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,293

    Default depends

    The sock question that is. Monkey gave a great answer on the boot themselves.
    How cold is cold? When do your feet get cold?
    I wear liners in mine rarely, but sometimes. I use smartwool socks, and carry a fleece liner to use when really cold. When it gets really cold they are just like any other boot. Still as long as no holes are in them they rock out.
    The insulated also soak up foot sweat for me at least so I love em.

  4. #4

    Default

    One great thing to use if your feet get cold is the foot warmers. They sell them at REI. They work great for wading boots, I used them late last fall when it was in the teens and there was 3-4" of ice on the edge of the river.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    489

    Default

    i worked in them all summer. I would say they wouldn't make a good winter boot for anything other that working in wet conditions. They aren't insulated as you would think a normal boot to be. its just some neopream (sp)

  6. #6

    Default

    I was wondering if they were good down to around say 10 degrees or so with a pair or two of wool socks and the liner.

  7. #7
    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Ketchikan, AK
    Posts
    4,076

    Default Bootie

    Extratuf makes an excellent insulated (blue) bootie you wear over your socks. It is very effective on absorbing moisture, but your socks and feet stay dry. I've been using them for about 2 years now and I love them. I usually wear a mild/thin smart wool sock and the booties. If I wear heavier socks and the booties I would have to get a half size larger boot.

    I believe the bootie is under $10.

    kingfisherktn

  8. #8
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    325

    Default What are you going to use them for?

    Quote Originally Posted by daveit View Post
    Do these make a good winter boot? What temperature are they good down to before you need to start adding warm socks? Thanks.
    Temperature ratings are not necessarily very telling. Are you ice fishing (standing on a block of ice) or are you doing something more mobile like hunting with lots of walkin? This makes a big difference in the style of boot and amount of insulation you need.

    For ice fishing, I've been wearing Sorrell Glaciers for the past 5 years or so and they've worked great for that. I tried a couple different boots prior to the Glaciers that were rated from -25 to -40 and they are fine if you're hunting Ptarmigan but they were not warm enough for ice fishing in mid-winter.

    Glaciers, however, are not all that great of a walking and hunting boot. They are big, heavy, and don't provide much in the way of ankle support.

    Also, how much water do you think you'll encounter? If you think you might get wet, a pac style boot is helpful. Another thing--unless you really need a lot of ankle support, tall boots that lace all the way up are a pain. Especially when they get wet and freeze. Hope this helps.

  9. #9
    Sponsor potbuilder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    4,229

    Default

    If your gonna be in the real cold get a pair of Bata Bunny boots, if your gonna play around town use the xtratuffs. I can't wear the xtra's their too tight on my calves, to tight in the ankle & way too narrow for my brick shaped feet. Thats why i like the bunnies you can get them in xtra wides. Even in the summer on the boat i wear a pair of lobstermans boots, their super light, wide at the top & comfy on my feet, made of some sort of pvc with air ballons in the formula.

    Alaska Shrimp Pots

    Rigid & Folding Shrimp & Crab Pots
    Electra Dyne Pot Haulers
    Ropes, Buoys, Bait
    alaskashrimppots.com
    akshrimppots@mtaonline.net
    907 775 1692

  10. #10

    Default Xtra tuffs....

    I wore the insulated boots 3 seasons commercial fishing on Cook Inlet (gillnet boat), they were great, but that's summer. I did wear them once snowmachining, but your feet get cold if you don't stay active. I don't think they're good enough for winter activities, unless you really layer up on socks, but like already mentioned, you would then need to get larger boots. They keep the water out by being snug around your ankles/calves. I wore them with 2 pair regular socks. I think 2 pair, one for summer, larger ones for winter (xtra socks, boot warmers) would be okay, but not to the point where you're safety is concerned. I think they say that you lose the most heat thru your head & feet (extremities).
    Jim
    PS---compared to other cheap rubber boots, Xtra tuffs are way comfy.

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    198

    Default Warm Xtratuffs

    When I first bought mine, a guy told me to slip in a pair of wool/felt insoles. Doing this did two things for me, the insoles made the boots a more comfortable fit and they made them much warmer. I haven't tried them in sub zero temps; I use my bunnies for that. However, with the insoles and wool socks, standing on snow all day with temps in the teens has been no problem.

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    21

    Default Muck Boots

    I bought a pair of Muck boots last year and used them around Fairbanks last winter getting wood, fishing, snowmachining and even hunting this fall. I think they are great! They might get cool if you were ice fishing for a long time, but if you are doing any walking they are great. I like the sole better than tuffies since they have more traction.
    Only bad thing is the softer rubber got torn up a bit but they still hold water.

  13. #13

    Default

    The new Simm's Extreme waders use boot foot Muck's good for up to -40. They are also lined with the thermo layer on the inside (emergency blanket material) and have wool like hand pockets. I got my pair and love them. Dont have to wear 7 layers loaded with foot and hand warmers with these babies!

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    100

    Default felt insoles

    Ditto on the felt inserts. These are standard fare when wearing my X-tra tuffs and bunny boots. I will also have a spare set when I'm out all day. I don't use my X-tras for winter wear. In winter I wear a boot that will work if something delays me or I get wet. I'm always amazed no matter how cold it has been, you can usually find water.
    pete

  15. #15

    Default

    I have worn insulated steel toe xtratuffs the last 2 winters while working on the North Slope. With the felt inserts, and good thick wool socks, I use them to about -20 with no problems, and I'm outside most the time. Colder than that, and I switch to bunny boots because the xtratuffs start to get stiff.

    They are one of the most popular boots you'll find in any mudroom in camp up here.

  16. #16

    Default Arctic Mucks

    I wear Arctic Mucks and love them for ice fishing. I use them year round though, for 4-wheeling, working, etc. Good stuff.
    Hike faster. I hear banjo music.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •