Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: Smoked Eggs...

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Sarasota, Florida
    Posts
    802

    Default Smoked Eggs...

    Whenever I run my smoker I place at least a dozen raw eggs that are still in shell. The moisture and smoke will cook them. The color on the shell is fantastic, the flavor good, but peeling them is a pain in the rear end...

    http://www.alaskanauthor.com

  2. #2
    Member BucknRut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    The BEGINNING of the road!
    Posts
    1,137

    Thumbs up I love smoked eggs!!!

    The ol' man will smoke...well, try to smoke all kinds of things. One Easter ma had a bunch of hardboiled easter eggs left over. He happened to be smoking sausage and decided to place them in the smoker. The thought of eating them was nasty and to look at them disengaged the appetite even more, but I tried them....AWESOME!! JUST AWESOME!! It is now a regular addition to any smoke.

    I'm having a hard time following the "raw" part. Do you cold smoke the eggs when raw or do they cook while in the smoker? If hot smoke, then how long before they blow?

    Surprised to see this thread! It's a good one!

    -Buck

  3. #3
    Member SoggyMountain's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Bait Station, Alaska 99801
    Posts
    861

    Default

    I'm a big time smoker fan, but raw eggs are way outside of my imagination... I won't discount it, but I won't run them in my smoker. - I'd have to eat someone else's first.... and that blindfolded!

    You're right Buck. This thread has some potential.
    "...just because we didn't agree with you doesn't mean we didn't have good discussion. It just means you missed it." -JMG-

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Sarasota, Florida
    Posts
    802

    Default Smoked eggs...

    I place them in my smoker raw and uncooked when there is moisture and higher heat. I would reckon that if I did it in a cold smoke, I should first hard boil them.

    By the way, save the egg carton. Put those eggs back in and then lay the entire carton on a friend for a gift. It sure will surprise them...

    http://www.alaskanauthor.com

  5. #5
    Member walk-in's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    North Pole
    Posts
    771

    Default I'll have to try this

    How long do you smoke them for? I'm going to give this a try in the spring when I break out the smoker again.

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Kodiak
    Posts
    158

    Default

    This thread intrigued me. So last weekend I boiled a dozen eggs and put them in my little chief smoker for about 6 hours (3 mostly full pans of alder chips) and they turned out pretty decent. The light smoke flavor of the egg whites was pretty good but next time I will either use more chips or use a stronger flavor wood.
    My wife thinks I'm half a bubble off but my kids and I like 'em.

  7. #7
    Member BucknRut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    The BEGINNING of the road!
    Posts
    1,137

    Default smoke time

    Quote Originally Posted by guns68 View Post
    This thread intrigued me. So last weekend I boiled a dozen eggs and put them in my little chief smoker for about 6 hours (3 mostly full pans of alder chips) and they turned out pretty decent. The light smoke flavor of the egg whites was pretty good but next time I will either use more chips or use a stronger flavor wood.
    My wife thinks I'm half a bubble off but my kids and I like 'em.
    Quote Originally Posted by walk-in View Post
    How long do you smoke them for? I'm going to give this a try in the spring when I break out the smoker again.
    I'm pretty sure we smoke them for much longer. WE put the sausage in early morning, maybe 7:00am and it is usually done about 4:00pm or so. I don't think we left them in the entire time, but it was longer than 6 hours. I will look back at my smoking log for more exact times.

    Did you smoke them in the shell or out of the shell?

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Kodiak
    Posts
    158

    Default

    I left them in the shell. This was my first attempt, so I'm open to any suggestions.

  9. #9
    New member
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    1

    Default cold smoked eggs

    hi there im from scotland, was trying out smoking eggs (cold smoke) boiled them first, smoked them for a good 6 hours and it didnt work at all, thought the smoke would penetrate the shell but it doesnt, so i think for cold smoking theys have to be shelled. cheers

  10. #10
    New member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    1

    Default

    i have a Little Chief that i bought recently and am always looking for excuses to use it....was happy to find that i was not the only person to wonder about smoked eggs...!

    i'm going to be smoking a chuck roast tomorrow and now that i know it can be done, i'll boil up some eggs and toss them in as well...

    i'll try it with boiled then peeled eggs... i was thinking of trying soft boiled, but its the whites that will be taking the heat and since the smoking (i expect) will dry them somewhat, they may end up rubbery anyway...

    i bet they would make super devilled eggs with crumbled bacon on the top....


    another thing i was thinking... has anyone done this with the shells on--- but crackled?

  11. #11
    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer, AK.
    Posts
    4,115

    Default Easy smoked eggs

    Hard boiled, shells off, at least a couple hours on the smoker. They are excellent!
    BK

  12. #12
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2

    Default How I cold smoke eggs

    My dad and I have been smoking eggs for several years. After a lot of trial and error, this is how I do it and everyone seems to love them.

    I use a Little Chief electric smoker and this method would be considered cold smoking. I'm sure the principles can be applied in many ways, though.

    You also need a large box... large enough to cover the smoker and allow a decent amount of clearance. Vent the box in two or three places on the top. I cut a small spot on one side to run the smokerís power cord through as well.

    1. Boil, peel, and rinse the eggs.

    2. Place eggs in wire container(s) (makes it easier to transport, but putting them directly on the rack would be fine as well).

    3. Put eggs into smoker (make sure they are separated).

    4. Place tray full (almost heaping) of wood chips onto heating element. I use hickory shreds (not chips), but Iím sure other types of wood would be fine as well.

    5. Place a pie-plate half filled with water on the lowest shelf. This adds moisture to the mix and helps to keep the eggs soft.

    6. Leave the door off of the smoker and place the box over the smoker so that the back of the smoker is 1-2 inches from the box (not sure, but I assume if it touches it might be a fire hazard). I do this to minimize the heat delivered to the eggs, while containing the smoke. I found that using the door on the smoker made the eggs rubbery due to the heat.

    7. Smoke eggs till wood shreds are consumed (with my smoker, it takes 40 to 50 minutes). I generally wait till I see no smoke coming from the vents in the box. For me and my family, this is enough smoke flavorÖ if you like more, refill and replace the smoking wood and smoke further to taste.

    8. Remove the box and the eggs. They should be a nice golden color.

    9. Cut each egg in half and remove the yolks into bowl. I place the emptied whites into an egg tray.

    10. Use a potato masher to mush yolks into a fine paste (so much easier than a fork).

    11. Pour mashed yolks into a large freezer bag.

    12. For each dozen yolks, add to bag: 1/4 cup mayonnaise, 1 tablespoon mustard, and 1/4 teaspoon hot sauce (I use tobacco because itís not that hot. Unless you know for sure, donít over do it).

    13. Use hands to mash and mix ingredients. Push the air out first before sealing and push contents down with fingers multiple times to mix properly. Taste with clean spoon and add ingredients to taste/texture.

    14. Push contents toward bottom corner of bag. Cut bottom corner of bag with scissors to create small hole.

    15. Use hands to push contents toward hole in bag and use it like a pastry bag to push contents into empty egg halves. Use a pushing motion to fluff filling till egg hollow is full and slightly overflowing.

    16. Fill under filled eggs with remaining filling (or just eat it).

    17. Sprinkle eggs with paprika when done and refrigerate till served.

  13. #13
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2

    Default A few other points

    1. I suppose I should have mentioned that I use this method for deviled eggs. I've never made a scotch egg, but I can only imagine that a smoked egg would be awesome for that... maybe smoked longer, though.

    2. I have read on other sites that you can "hot smoke" an egg from the raw state and the egg shell is air permeable enough to allow the smoke to enter the inside of the egg (might want to wash the egg first though, to help remove the thin coating that seals the egg). I believe they said that the temperature of the smoker shouldn't exceed 230 or 240 degrees, though, or you risk overheating and bursting the egg. They said to smoke the egg for two hours and that the smoke color would run through the white. They also said that peeling the egg can be difficult. I haven't tried this yet, but plan to when I get my new smoker set up.

    3. I have read that a boiled egg should be refrigerated no later than two hours after cooking to avoid spoiling/food-born illness. That, and the fact that my mom raised me to be paranoid about salmonella, etc., means that I never cold smoke boiled eggs when the temperature is above 45-50 degrees outside (I figure the smoking process adds at least 5-10 degrees, though I have never measured it). I live in Michigan, so this usually isn't a problem as I normally make these smoked deviled eggs for Easter, Thanksgiving, and Christmas, but this year it was unseasonably warm (65-70 degrees) at Easter and I opted not to smoke the eggs. Everyone was disappointed, but I didn't want to risk getting my family sick.

    If you have an opinion or facts about whether or not you think this would have been safe, I'd really appreciate the information.

  14. #14
    New member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    1

    Default Smoked eggs

    Quote Originally Posted by Bernard R. Rosenberg View Post
    Whenever I run my smoker I place at least a dozen raw eggs that are still in shell. The moisture and smoke will cook them. The color on the shell is fantastic, the flavor good, but peeling them is a pain in the rear end...

    http://www.alaskanauthor.com
    I place whole eggs from the refrigerator on the smoker before firing it up. The eggs get up to temp along with the smoker. This follows the procedure for boiling eggs without the eggs bursting. Let them smoke at close to 200 degrees for 2.5 hours. Take them off and place them into ice water. I let them sit in the ice water for about 2 minutes. After the ice water bath, I crack them under cold running water and they peel quite easily. The running water seems to get under the shell and help with the peeling. The smoke flavor is nice subtle taste. This is good stuff if you like eggs.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •