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Thread: any good tricks to cooking rabbit?

  1. #1
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    Default any good tricks to cooking rabbit?

    Went small game hunting and found no birds - just one rabbit. Have cooked rabbit many times before, but usually when camping - over a fire. Now I have one home and am wondering if there are any good ideas for a real tasty dinner treat. Thank you for any suggestions you might have.

  2. #2
    Member SoggyMountain's Avatar
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    Default

    I like them in stir fry and fried rice.

    They're not too bad with country gravy over mashed potatoes too.

    Last year I got to test them as jerkey .... I make two types. Both turned out good!
    "...just because we didn't agree with you doesn't mean we didn't have good discussion. It just means you missed it." -JMG-

  3. #3

    Default Not for me

    No matter what I did it always ended up tasting like rabbit. I have given up. I guese my favorite if I had one was to brown it, cube it and make a meat pot pie in a cast iron skillet. I will probably eat some more in a couple of years as the grand kids are getting older.

  4. #4
    Member walk-in's Avatar
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    Default stew

    I almost always turn mine into stew meat. Add a can of beef broth, potatoes, carrots, barley, a couple bay leaves, some onion, and garlic powder. Can't beat it. If I have enough, I'll occasionally can it when I'm canning other stew meat.
    A friend of mine always used to shake and bake rabbits. Thats not bad, either.

  5. #5
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    Default Sweet and Sour Rabbit...

    You'll find it on page 2 of this forum. Scroll down. I wrote it after the Bunny Debacle...


    www.alaskanauthor.com

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    Default thanx

    thank you... I went and got some ptarmingan today... now for an adventure in a new kind of food prep.

  7. #7

    Default Rabbits and ptarmigan

    One thing I ALWAYS do for the hares up here, cottontails when I was growing up in Arkansas and ptarmigan and spruce hens is I soak them in either buttermilk for at least 24 hours, or in a salted brine. Not so salty you can float an egg, but enough to draw out the "wild" taste.
    If you soak it in buttermilk, make sure the milk can permeate into all the folds of the meat. Don't let the meat stack on each other, or put too much in a container where it keeps the meat from getting coated the entire time. Sometimes, if it is late in the year, I will either cut all the meat into strips, or make cuts all over it so the buttermilk or brine can get into it and do it's magic.
    Unlike fish, I place this brine or buttermilked meat into the fridge for at least 24 hours.
    If you have a foodsaver, use it with the vacuum containers to marinate it. You can spice it too, but I like to use straight buttermilk or brine. This draws the "nasty" out, and also tenderizes the meat. Makes it delicious.

    Once it is done, I make a coating of flour, cajun spices and cayenne pepper. I add sage if it is spruce hens. Do an egg wash, dredge in the flour mix and fry.
    Now just why in the hell do I have to press "1" for English???

  8. #8
    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
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    Default My favorite rabbit recipe

    Bone and cut up rabbit into 1/2-3/4" chunks and pre-cook it in a little bit of olive oil in a dutch oven then set it aside. Boil or micro 3 large cut up carrots, drain and set aside.

    Fry 4-5 chunked potatoes in a little oil in the dutch oven and remove and set aside.

    Add 1 minced garlic, 1 tsp of green mint & 1 tablespoon of oil in dutch oven, brown garlic and mint, add rabbit, carrots and potatoes. Salt to taste and add 1/2-1 tsp of black pepper. Add 1 tablespoon of cider vinegar and stir. Cover and simmer 10-15 minutes.

    grrreatt!

  9. #9
    Member SoggyMountain's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kingfisherktn View Post
    Bone and cut up rabbit into 1/2-3/4" chunks and pre-cook it in a little bit of olive oil in a dutch oven then set it aside. Boil or micro 3 large cut up carrots, drain and set aside.

    Fry 4-5 chunked potatoes in a little oil in the dutch oven and remove and set aside.

    Add 1 minced garlic, 1 tsp of green mint & 1 tablespoon of oil in dutch oven, brown garlic and mint, add rabbit, carrots and potatoes. Salt to taste and add 1/2-1 tsp of black pepper. Add 1 tablespoon of cider vinegar and stir. Cover and simmer 10-15 minutes.

    grrreatt!
    That sounds good too!! Let's head off to the recipe board and see what we can serve up.
    "...just because we didn't agree with you doesn't mean we didn't have good discussion. It just means you missed it." -JMG-

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    Member SoggyMountain's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by walk-in View Post
    I almost always turn mine into stew meat. Add a can of beef broth, potatoes, carrots, barley, a couple bay leaves, some onion, and garlic powder. Can't beat it. If I have enough, I'll occasionally can it when I'm canning other stew meat.
    A friend of mine always used to shake and bake rabbits. Thats not bad, either.

    I did a rabbit/ptarmigan stew one time that was excellent... also used two beef bullion cubes. I think I had two rabbits and 6 ptarmigan in the pot, and between 4 people it was gone the first night with everyone wanting more.

    If I remember right I had quick fried all of the meat first while the bullion on vegitable stock was boiling down.... then I added the meats and simmered for a couple hours.
    "...just because we didn't agree with you doesn't mean we didn't have good discussion. It just means you missed it." -JMG-

  11. #11
    Member SoggyMountain's Avatar
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    Default

    Oops ... this IS the recipe/pantry board.... okay then, away we go!
    "...just because we didn't agree with you doesn't mean we didn't have good discussion. It just means you missed it." -JMG-

  12. #12
    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
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    Default Soggy:

    Quote Originally Posted by SoggyMountain View Post
    That sounds good too!! Let's head off to the recipe board and see what we can serve up.

    I'm getting hungry thinking about it. I've also use chicked as a subtitute when I haven't had rabbit and it works well too. Might also work for ruffies/ or Ptarmigin. Now I'm going to have to experiment.


    kingfisherktn

  13. #13

    Default

    We practically live on snowshoe hare. In our experience an overnight soak in a brine solution is key to happiness.

    Here's some of our favorites:

    Forget the beef in Texas-style chili. Substitute cubed snowshoe hare for the beef, and you'll be convinced that the dish was first invented for tough jackrabbits when beef was scarce.

    If you can tell young from old, use the young ones for old-style slow cooked fried chicken, the kind your grandmother used to make with only a little oil in a cast iron skillet. If you like chicken thighs, you'll like the rabbit.

    Completely bone out the rabbits and accumulate 25 pounds of meat. Take it to a commercial smokehouse and pay them to make "pepper stick," that sausage that's around an inch in diameter and precooked. Nothing better on pizza or in spagetti. Great browned in scrambled eggs. Mighty fine all by itself with a beer in front of the TV.

    There's more, but that will use up most of the rabbits you can shoot this winter.

  14. #14
    Member SoggyMountain's Avatar
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    Default

    Brownbear... I make "pepper sticks." They aren't as big as you mentioned, but they are a great snack to take along on any outing...or, for Football on Sunday.

    The only credit I can take for mine is that I lucked into the "High Mountain" brand of seasonings...and threw in a dash or two more of pepper.
    "...just because we didn't agree with you doesn't mean we didn't have good discussion. It just means you missed it." -JMG-

  15. #15

    Default rabbit

    I lightly flour and brown the rabbit in a iron skillet and then put it in a electric skillet or slow cooker, cover with bbq sauce and cook all day.
    I will fall apart and make great sandwiches.

    Randy

  16. #16
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    Default Pan fry

    I agree with BrownBear to pan fry it. use a salt brine to soak over night (I even do this with store bought chicken). Then batter, there are 2 choices here,
    Dry -- 1/2 corn meal and 1/2 flour and spice to taste. then drop your meat in and coat evenly. then pan fry with a small amount of oil.

    Wet -- Place the meat in a bowl of milk then drop into seasoned flour then place in a beaten egg whites then coat with crushed corn flakes or crushed saltines for a crispier rabbit

    Also if you like to BBQ then do the brine soak over night and fire up the grill and cook it like you would for BBQ chicken with your favorite sauce.

  17. #17
    Member alaskan winmag's Avatar
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    Default For Stew

    Try using a pressure cooker first with garlic and onions then toss it all in the stew. Delicious

  18. #18

    Thumbs up

    all great recipes, a simple one to add to the list is to soak in sea salt for a hour or so melt butter in cast iron pan, thrown the legs ect. in, put some lawry's season salt to it and fry on low for 45 min to an hour or so, then put some garlic to it.

  19. #19

    Default Mr.Lapin

    Since I'm descended from a long line of Acadian French, I feel I can speak with a certain authority about Monsieur Lapin.
    First thing: If it's good with dark meat chicken, it's probably better with rabbit.
    Second thing: Rabbit needs a little wine. Just like mushrooms, wine unlocks rabbit.
    The French may be confused about a lot of things, food isn't one of them.

    Rabbit in white whine tarragon cream sauce

    1-2 quartered rabbit(s)
    ½ pint dry white wine
    6 shallots, peeled
    2 cloves of garlic, peeled
    2 tbsp olive oil
    4 slices of smoked bacon or pancetta
    2 tbsp fresh tarragon, roughly chopped
    2 tbsp crème fraîche or heavy cream
    salt and pepper

    1. Heat the oil in a large heavy-bottomed pan (big enough to fit the rabbit pieces snugly in one layer) and fry the bacon or pancetta until it starts to go crispy. Remove to a plate.
    2. Season the rabbit quarters and add to the oil and bacon fat. Fry on all sides until they are a deep golden brown, and remove them.
    3. Fry the whole shallots and garlic cloves in the same oil until they start to brown, then add the bacon or pancetta and rabbit pieces.
    4. Add enough white wine to just about cover the rabbit, and scatter the chopped tarragon on top. Turn down the heat until it is just barely simmering, and cook, uncovered, for one hour, turning the chicken pieces over half way through.
    5. When you are ready to serve, dish up the rabbit and shallots onto warmed plates, and quickly whisk in the cream to the reduced juices left in the pan. Spoon the sauce over the rabbit

    Yum!


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