On November 1, NRA is launching a new Web site devoted to hunters' rights. All factors that affect your freedom to hunt, and the future of the sport itself, will be addressed at www.nrahuntersrights.org.

The site will not tell you how to hunt, where to put your tree stand or what the best guns and loads are for your favorite species. Many Web sites and magazines can already tell you all that.

The site will alert you about threats to hunting and NRA's efforts to combat them -- our direct lobbying efforts at every level, our hunter recruitment and instruction programs and our funding of conservation and range improvement projects.

Commenting on the need for this site, Kayne Robinson, Executive Director of General Operations, said, "Hunting is under attack in ways it has never been attacked before. Stifling regulations are overly complex and too often have nothing to do with game management. Anti-hunting groups with well-financed coffers and celebrity spokespersons grab every headline they can get. Nit-picking laws that turn inadvertent mistakes into criminal offenses are becoming common horror stories. Shrinking lands, dwindling numbers of hunters and other factors are combining to threaten the sport more and more."

But whether it's a proposed ban on hunting ammunition, the closure of public hunting lands, or regulations that are actually driving people out of the sport, NRA is at work on every front to ensure your continued right to hunt. The combination of NRA's political strength, hunting programs, grant funding and the sheer size of our hunting membership make us the most formidable defender of hunting there is.

The new site will give credit where it's due, too. If a new range opens in your state, if a season is extended or added, or if a youth mentored hunt is instituted, you'll read about it at www.nrahuntersrights.org. With limited time and resources, hunters need to know about every new opportunity, place to hunt, or new season available.

NRAhuntersrights.org will also provide many opportunities for hunter input and recognition. We'll be open to stories from you on a variety of topics, such as:

Trophy Gallery--Share your hunting photos with others.
Hunt Reports--Had a particularly good or bad experience with an outfitter? Let us know.
Gut Check--Your true stories of survival.
Unsung Heroes--Know someone in your state doing good work for hunters? Let's give that person some recognition.
Regulatory Issues--Is there a hunting law in your state you feel just doesn't make sense?

Guidelines for submitting all such material are available by sending an email to: huntersrights@nrahq.org. Just put "Hunters Rights Guidelines" in the subject line. Your questions and comments on the site are welcome at the same address.