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Thread: what kind are you?

  1. #1
    Member homerdave's Avatar
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    Question what kind are you?

    this is a synopsis of a study comparing hunters and non or anti-hunters...

    TYPES OF HUNTERS

    Many wildlife managers feel that Yale professor Dr. Stephen Kellert's
    1978 study of U.S. hunters and their attitudes and characteristics
    still mostly applies today in North America.

    He found three categories of hunters:

    - Utilitarian/Meat Hunters (43.8%)
    - Nature Hunters (17.7%)
    - Dominionistic/Sport Hunters (38.5%)

    The dominionistic/sport group is the one that the non- and
    anti-hunting public particularly dislike and often use to stereotype
    or negatively portray ALL hunters and hunting.

    UTILITARIAN/MEAT HUNTERS

    "Hunting to obtain meat was the most frequently cited primary reason,
    accounting for 43.8 percent of persons who hunted..." [p.413]

    Utilitarian/meat hunters were significantly more likey to have been
    raised or presently living in rural, open-country areas. Relatedly,
    utilitarian/meat hunters reported much greater experience with raising
    animals for either slaughter or nonslaugher purposes, and fathers
    employed in farm-related occupations. This hunting group included a
    disproportionate number of persons over 65 years of age and
    significantly more respondents earning less than $6,000." [p.414]

    "Utilitarian/meat hunters appeared to perceive animals largely from
    the perspective of their practical usefulness... The utilitarian/meat
    hunter viewed hunting as a harvesting activity and wild animals as a
    harvestable crop not unlike other renewable natural resources."
    [p.414]

    NATURE HUNTERS

    "Hunting for the purpose of close contact with nature was the... cited
    primary reason for hunting, accounting for some 17.7 percent of those
    who hunted... Demographically, nature hunters included significantly
    more persons under 30 years of age and far fewer over 65. These age
    characteristics may suggest possible trends in motivation for
    hunting. Nature hunters were also of higher socioeconomic status, as
    indicated by more college-educated respondents and more fathers
    employed in professional and business-executive occupations.

    Nature hunters reported by far the most adult and childhood wildlife
    interest, more backpacking and camping-out experience, and more
    birdwatching activity. Importantly, nature hunters had far higher
    knowledge-of-animals scale scores particularly in comparison to
    dominionistic/sport hunters." [p.414]

    [Nature hunters also] "...indicated strong concern and affection for
    all animals... [However this affection is] ...somewhat generalized and
    not specifically directed at pet animals or manifest in the feeling of
    "loving" animals. The desire for an active, participatory role in
    nature was perhaps the most significant aspect of the nature hunter's
    approach to hunting. The goal was the intense involvement with wild
    animals in their natural habitats. Participation as a predator was
    valued for the opportunities it provided to regard oneself as an
    integral part of nature. The hunt was appreciated for its forcing of
    awareness of natural phenomena organized into a coherent,
    goal-directed framework." [p. 415]

    DOMINIONISTIC/SPORT HUNTERS

    "Dominionistic/sport hunters constitute 38.5 percent of all those who
    hunted... They were significantly more likely to reside in cities,
    and to have been in the armed forces. Additionally, they differed from
    utilitarian/meat hunters in reporting far less experience raising
    animals for a product, and from nature hunters in reporting
    significantly less backpacking and birdwatching activities. One
    outstanding characteristic was their low scores on the
    knowledge-of-animals scale. Interestingly, only anti-hunters, of all
    animal activity groups studied, had equally low knowledge scores."

    "...It appeared that competition and mastery over animals, in the
    context of a sporting contest, were the most salient aspects of the
    dominionistic/sport hunter's interest in the hunting activity. This
    group did not reveal strong affections for animals." [p.416]

    "The hunted animal was valued largely for the opportunities it
    provided to engage in a sporting activity involving mastery,
    competition, shooting skill and expressions of prowness. ...They were
    not items of food but trophies, something to get and display to fellow
    hunters. For the dominionistic/sport hunter, hunting was appreciated
    more as a human social than as an animal-oriented activity."
    [p.416-417]

    -------
    Stephen Kellert, "Attitudes and Characteristics of Hunters and
    Antihunters" (Transactions of the Forty-third North American Wildlife
    and Natural Resources Conference, 1978). pp.412-423.
    Alaska Board of Game 2015 tour... "Kicking the can down the road"
    http://www.alaskabackcountryhunters.org/

  2. #2
    Mark
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    Quote Originally Posted by homerdave View Post
    ......Many wildlife managers feel that Yale professor Dr. Stephen Kellert's
    1978 study of U.S. hunters and their attitudes and characteristics
    still mostly applies today in North America.

    He found three categories of hunters:

    - Utilitarian/Meat Hunters (43.8%)
    - Nature Hunters (17.7%)
    - Dominionistic/Sport Hunters (38.5%).......
    I would say that I'm both a Utilitarian/Meat hunter and a Nature Hunter. I may be close to 50%/50% of both/either at this point in my life.

    I'm definately not a Dominionistic/Sport Hunter:

    .....they differed from utilitarian/meat hunters in reporting far less experience raising
    animals for a product....
    I still raise livestock.

    .....One
    outstanding characteristic was their low scores on the
    knowledge-of-animals scale. Interestingly, only anti-hunters, of all
    animal activity groups studied, had equally low knowledge scores
    .......
    Interestingly, indeed. I'd like to see more regarding the anti-hunters.

    "...It appeared that competition and mastery over animals, in the
    context of a sporting contest, were the most salient aspects of the
    dominionistic/sport hunter's interest in the hunting activity..........."The hunted animal was valued largely for the opportunities it
    provided to engage in a sporting activity involving mastery,
    competition, shooting skill and expressions of prowness. ...
    AKPM, is that the "challenge" thing you referred to recently?

  3. #3
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    Default what kind?

    "Interestingly, only anti-hunters, of all
    animal activity groups studied, had equally low knowledge scores.......
    Interestingly, indeed. I'd like to see more regarding the anti-hunters."

    You picked up on that too Mark. It explains a lot about anti hunters. And explains a lot about the conflict between hunters and non hunters. The two groups causing all the conflict are the least knowledgeable from each side of the equation. That's been my belief all along.

    Myself, I'd say I'm 45% a meat hunter, 45% a nature hunter, and 10% a sport or trophy hunter.

    #1 if it wasn't for the meat I wouldn't hunt. But I enjoy the getting out and getting away from everything and taking in all nature has to offer. Hunting is the best way to experience nature in my mind. Now if I couldn't hunt, I'd find a different activity that got me out there, but it wouldn't quite be the same. I wouldn't quite feel like I was a part of what was going on. I'd feel like a viewer, not a participant. Kind of like watching football on TV instead of being there and in the game. You can appreciate most of what's going on, but until you get smacked a few times, you don't appreciate it to the full degree.

    As far as the sport or trophy hunting part, I appreciate trophy size animals, and will sometimes make an effort to take one, but the emphasis is still on meat and enjoying nature. If I take a big animal, I'm still more worried about taking care of the meat than taking care of the "trophy". The flip side of that is I have no problem with taking small or young animals. That actually is more natural. In the wild, the young and old are the first to go. I wouldn't shoot an animal that was caged or drugged or genetically altered or fed something to produce an over sized rack no matter how big it was and certainly can't call that hunting. All that is, is executing a farm animal. If it isn't wild and free, it isn't hunting. Period.

  4. #4

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    I can be any one of those three depending on what i'm hunting.

  5. #5
    Mark
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    Quote Originally Posted by twodux View Post
    Interestingly, only anti-hunters, of all
    animal activity groups studied
    , had equally low knowledge scores.......
    Interestingly, indeed. I'd like to see more regarding the anti-hunters.
    You picked up on that too Mark. It explains a lot about anti hunters. And explains a lot about the conflict between hunters and non hunters. The two groups causing all the conflict are the least knowledgeable from each side of the equation. That's been my belief all along.......
    Like I wrote, I'd like to see more of the "studies" of anti-hunters.

    I suspect there would be a lot that society needs to learn about them, in addition to their utter ignorance regarding wild animals and the wilderness in general.

  6. #6
    Member martentrapper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AkHunter45 View Post
    I can be any one of those three depending on what i'm hunting.
    University studies aside............the above statement fits 99.9% of us I bet. I would also bet our status depends on the animal standing in our sights when we choose to pull, or not pull, the trigger.
    I can't help being a lazy, dumb, weekend warrior.......I have a JOB!
    I have less friends now!!

  7. #7
    Member AKRDGRUNNER's Avatar
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    Default Fence Sitter

    50%meat hunter 50% nature hunter......I dont intentionally trophy hunt.

  8. #8
    Member Alaskacajun's Avatar
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    Default

    +1 what Martentrapper said...

    - Clint

  9. #9

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    I wouldn't recommend that anyone respond to this rhetoric as this point is null and void. We are all hunters and no matter what we do, we need to stand together.

  10. #10
    Member AKRDGRUNNER's Avatar
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    Thumbs up

    Well Said Kusko

    even though i am guilty of responding

  11. #11
    Member SoggyMountain's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kusko View Post
    I wouldn't recommend that anyone respond to this rhetoric as this point is null and void. We are all hunters and no matter what we do, we need to stand together.
    Diversity makes life fun!

    I'd say I'm 68% meat - 30% Nature - 2% Trophy.... Very similar sentiments to twodux.

  12. #12
    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default Dominionistic all the way.

    My wall is now plastered with the heads of all the spruce chickens and rabbits I manage to kill. They are in very realistic and ferocious poses. You should see my sweet European mount of a teal head. Did I mention my squirrel hide rugs?

  13. #13
    Member MARV1's Avatar
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    Should have put this in an actual poll.
    The emphasis is on accuracy, not power!

  14. #14
    Member garnede's Avatar
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    I'd say I'm 75% meat - 22% Nature - 3% Trophy

  15. #15
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    I'd say that every hunt is different, I try to put myself in hunting situations where healthy low cost protein is my primary consideration in hunting. However I've spent way to much money on duck hunting for the amount of meat I get (this could have to do with my lack of shooting skill), I guess thats part of the challenge.

    The best thing about hunting for me however is the connection with nature in the sport side and the consumptive side. Theres something very satisfying about going into the woods, swamp, stream, whatever and knowing that you, using your intellect have defeated the supieror senses of a wild animal, and by doing that you connect with nature, and feel as if you are a part of it in some small way (this is of course the primary reason I fly fish, where I catch and release most of my catch). Of course when you consume something that you have killed it is the culmination of the natural food chain, and you as a predator have taken your place in its cycle, in other words another way to connect with nature.
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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    Default Meat

    I'm all about the meat- if there are 2 bulls standing side by side, one is 60" and the other is a forkie- I kill the 60"- WAY more meat- and its antlers look better on my wall

    If there is a 40" ram and a 34" ram, both full curl/8, I kill the 40"- because he probably has a bigger body= more meat, and his horns look better on my wall

    If there is a 9' Brown bear, I kill the bear, and let other bears eat the carcass- because that's a lot of meat- and his hide/skull looks great on my wall.

    Bottom line for me is to fill the freezer with healthy alteratives to supermarket meat- if they happen to be equipped with a nice rack, that's merely a bonus. As for killing the bear- I believe that leads to more meat in the freezer in the form of more 'consumable' game- I'm not a big fan of a juicy rotten salmon eating brown bear backstrap...but that's just me.

  17. #17
    Member AKBassking's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kusko View Post
    I wouldn't recommend that anyone respond to this rhetoric as this point is null and void. We are all hunters and no matter what we do, we need to stand together.

    I agree!!!

    ALASKAN SEA-DUCTION
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    Blog: http://alaskanseaduction.blogspot.com/

  18. #18
    Member sbiinc's Avatar
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    Default my 2 cents

    kusko I'm sorry, we're all hunters but we certianly don't hunt the same. Still I agree we should stand together for our rights... but it certianly doesn't make this poll rhetoric.

    I started hunting in Louisana primarily as a meat hunter (poor family), but now I'd say I'm close to the same lines as twodux, about a 40-55-5 split, even though now I can certianlly afford to buy meat. // ammending this statement kinda, the 5% I'd attribute to DOMINIONISTIC/SPORT HUNTERS only pertains to about 30% of the definition in the original post.

    Hunting up here is like a gateway drug, I don't like to kill animals just for trophys but believe more in pretador control the more I become educated (some of which is due to reading this forum) and would certianly never kill an animal I don't harvest at least something off of, heck unless its mosquitos or roaches. But I am proud as hell of some of the nice animals I have been blessed to harvest up here.

  19. #19
    Member AKRDGRUNNER's Avatar
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    Default bwhahahaha

    Quote Originally Posted by sayak View Post
    My wall is now plastered with the heads of all the spruce chickens and rabbits I manage to kill. They are in very realistic and ferocious poses. You should see my sweet European mount of a teal head. Did I mention my squirrel hide rugs?

    I would be interested in some of them there squirrel hides rugs!!!! what did them runya?

  20. #20
    Member Phil's Avatar
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    Default Old

    I'm primarily a meat hunter even though I don't actually have to get wild meat to survive.

    Besides that, I'm over 65.

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