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Thread: Haul Road Sucess and First Spot-n-Stalk Bow Kill

  1. #1
    Member Kay9Cop's Avatar
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    Default Haul Road Sucess and First Spot-n-Stalk Bow Kill

    My wife and I went up the Haul Road 4 - 7 Sep 07; both of us bow hunting and intending to take one caribou apiece. Roads were a little slippery in spots, but nothing cautious driving couldn't cure. We were pretty disappointed when we didn't see Caribou until almost to Pump Station 2.

    Our first day hunting, 5 Sep 07, we put on six stalks and all failed. My wife got within 70 yards of a smallish bull, but her self-imposed limit was 40 yards. Our other stalks ended between 100 and 200 yards out; the stalking was difficult with so little cover. One of our stalks took us over a hill, which revealed a herd of about 30 caribou hidden from view from the road. The caribou ended up being about two miles off the road, but there was a dried up creek bed that had small scrub brush for good cover and would take us near where the caribou were bedding. Time ran out and we decided to come back the next day for another attempt.

    On our second day, we did a quick tour of the road for 20 miles in either direction and didn't find any easy pickings. So, we headed back to the area where we saw the herd of 30 the day before. As we crested the hill, my wife spotted a cow. We were just looking to fill the freezer, so this was a viable option. My wife got within 100 yards, but I got spotted trying to circle around them and they bolted. After the blown stalk, we spotted three caribou bedded close to the dried creek bed. One was a nice bull and the other two cows. We decided to give them a try even though they were two miles from the road.

    We easily walked bent over to within 220 yards. At that range, I saw they were bedded about 50 yards from the cover brush. That distance was beyond my wife's range so she deferred to me. My wife remained behind while I crawled on my hands and knees for another 140 yards to within 80 yards. The caribou still weren't alerted so I slowly belly crawled, basically moving with my arms and dragging my legs behind me, for another 30 yards. This brought me to within 50 yards, a shot I had practiced for months. I waited for about a half an hour, but the caribou seemed to be content to stay bedded. I was getting cold and I knew my wife had to be freezing at that point because the stalk from 220 to 50 yards took over an hour and a half.

    I pondered different ways to get the caribou to stand and settled on rising to my knees to draw my bow. As I rose from my hidden spot, one of the cows rose and caused the bull to rise. I drew back my bow and let my arrow fly. The arrow hit a little back from where I wanted because he started to step forward, but I still double lunged him. He ran about a hundred yards and flopped over.

    Here's some photos from my bull:





    I shot the bull with a Mathews Switchback at 70 lbs. and 29 inch draw length. The arrows were Gold Tip 7595 Pro Hunters tipped with Wac'em 125 grain four-blade Exits. The broad head slipped in between ribs on the entry, but busted a rib in half on the exit. I practiced shots out to 80 yards (Spot Hogg 7 Deadly Pins Sight set at 20-30-40-50-60-70-80) and could hit a 10 inch circle at that distance easily. My self-imposed limit for hunting was 60 yards and this 50 yard shot seemed easy.

    This is my first spot-n-stalk bow kill and I think I'm hooked. I shot a caribou two years ago with a rifle after the five mile hike in and this was much more satisfying.

    We brought a Wilderness sled to haul out the caribou, thinking there would be more snow on the ground. On our third day of hunting, my wife was really sore in her upper back from pushing the sled while I pulled it with a mocked up harness. She tried drawing her bow back that morning and found it was fairly painful. We decided to call it quits and headed home feeling more than sucessful. Next year we'll go back and get my wife a caribou.

  2. #2
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    dude a big congrats to you,that is awesome and a fine Bull you harvested.You know we walked in 7 miles 3 years ago and used a sled my son rides in in the winter to help haul the meat,it worked to an extent but we managed one trip.Man thats a great animal,again congrats.Daniel

  3. #3

    Default Nice

    Congratulations, good times.
    Marc Theiler

  4. #4

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    nice looking animal, congrats!

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    Default right on

    Well done and with your wife to boot. Good picts, and great story. Thanks for sharing.

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    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
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    Nice job, how was the meat?
    Living the Alaskan Dream
    Gary Keller
    Anchorage, AK

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    Member Kay9Cop's Avatar
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    I was worried the meat might be a problem. During the time I observed him, I did not observe any signs that he was rutting. I smelled him when I approached him and he did not smell bad. When we butchered him, the meat smelled just fine. I've never shot a rutting bull, but from the way people describe the meat of a rutting bull I think I should smell something bad from the meat.

  8. #8

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    Job well done. Nice bull.

  9. #9

    Default a real bow hunt

    awesome!! 50 yds is a long shot on any animal. perfect.

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    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    looks like that broadhead left a HOLE!
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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    Member Kay9Cop's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ak_powder_monkey View Post
    looks like that broadhead left a HOLE!
    This was my first time shooting an animal with the new-age short ferrule broad heads. I'm used to larger cut-on-contact broad heads like the Magnus Stinger. I was a bit concerned about the four-blade and the small cutting diameter (1 1/16th inch), but it appears my concerns were unfounded. They fly so well and seem to do the job so I don't think I'll be changing any time soon.

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    Member Dan in Alaska's Avatar
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    Nice job! Great looking animal.

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    Kay9, that is an awesome story with great pics!!

    Hey, looking at your photo I think I met you in the sportsman's warehouse in Anchorage last year, I am an officer from Sault, MI and I think we traded patches... I could be wrong but you definetly look familiar.. does that ring a bell with you?

    Anyway .. great job I am planing a hunt up the Haul Rd. next year any tips would be great.

  14. #14

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    great job. 50 yards is a great shot, i also practive at long ranges. I have up to the 80 pin and practice up to 100. My first ever BOU on the haul road was taken at 68yds. 2nd at 54yds and this years at 12 yds. It's all about practice and confidence. great caribou and good luck next year getting the wife hers.

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    Default Nice bull!

    Nice bull. I read the original thread and was alittle concerned. You said you wife stocked a cow and got to one hundred yards. Either sex season does not open until Oct 1st. Did you have a either sex tag?

    Just wondering?

  16. #16
    Member Kay9Cop's Avatar
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    My first post was three weeks ago, so after 1 Oct and either sex was open. I see that I said Sep in the post and that is incorrect. It was actually in Oct and on the same days over Columbus Day weekend.

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    Member schmidty_dog's Avatar
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    Default What brand camo you got?

    Great Job! Thats a real pretty caribou, and I'm sure he tastes pretty good too! Practicing 80 yard shots with a bow seems unreal to me, but I shoot an old PSE that is a little hard to keep my groups real tight.

    I'm just curious, what brand camo is that you are wearing?

    schmidty

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    Quote Originally Posted by schmidty_dog View Post
    I'm just curious, what brand camo is that you are wearing?

    schmidty
    It's Cabelas Berber fleece. I have the same stuff. Awesome clothing, it's like wearin my pjs hunting. I love the stuff, but it's on the pricey side.

  19. #19
    Member tboehm's Avatar
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    Default I know the feeling

    Great job and a nice animal. My first caribou hunt was with my wife and she was a great hunting partner. Hope that her back is doing better.

  20. #20
    Member Kay9Cop's Avatar
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    Yep, the jacket is Cabela's Berber Fleece in Outfitter Camo. The pants and shirt underneath the jacket are Cabela's Microtex in Outfitter Camo. The camo pattern isn't the prettiest, but I've found it to work very well in Alaska. At greater distances, the Outfitter Camo blends in better where I've found other patterns like Mossy Oak and Real Tree seem to just become dark blobs out past 100 yards.

    Quote Originally Posted by F-16Pointy View Post
    It's Cabelas Berber fleece. I have the same stuff. Awesome clothing, it's like wearin my pjs hunting. I love the stuff, but it's on the pricey side.

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