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Thread: winterizing a smaller boat

  1. #1
    Member LungShot's Avatar
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    Default winterizing a smaller boat

    I see lots of posts about winterizing medium to large sized boats but not much about smaller ones. Im more concerned about the motor than the boat. It's a 90/65 merc jet. I cant move it inside or anything so I guess I just need to know what any of you guys do to winterize your outboards. It will be tarp coverd but I wanna make sure the freezing, and thawing isn't gonna mess anything up. Im in Juneau - lots of freezing/ thawing/ rain/ and if like last year 15 plus ft of snow. Advice? - thanx.

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    Member LungShot's Avatar
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    Default cmon!

    I guess I will re ask. Im sure you dont need to put alot into winterizing a small boat but what do any of you do with your jet motors or 100 horse, and smaller motors? Anyone keep them outside? If so what do you do to protect them for winter? I ask this cus I just pulled mine into the garage becuase I am paranoid of leaving it out once it starts to freeze. Problem is I have a 1 car garage that I have made into a workshop, and office so Im basicly wedged in here right now typing on my computer. Ive got about 18 inches on each side of the darn boat to squeeze in, and out of my office area. I need to shove this thing back outside! Help!

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    Default Winterizing Small Motors

    I change the lower unit oil, remove the plugs & spray lots of 'fogger' in the cylinder(s), turn the engine over a few times and reinsert the plugs to proper torque. You can spray the fogger into the carb as well. I'll spray the entire engine in WD 40 as I use it in salt water. That's it. I'll cover the motor with a soft rag and then a tarp. You can add stabil to your gas tank, or just burn it off in your snowblower. 'Stale' gas in your lawnmower or snowblower is one thing, but you don't want it in your boat motor.

  4. #4

    Default Winterize smaller boat

    I did mine 2 strok 40hp Saturday.

    Lubed up the jet unit real well. If you have a prop I don't know what to do for the lower unit.

    Warm up engine real good in the driveway.

    1. Took the air filter off the carbs. Disconnected the gas line at the engine. Started spraying fogging oil in. Pretty quick the motor choked out.
    2. Opened up the little brass drainplugs at the bottom of each carb and let whatever gas was floating around in the bottom of the carb drip out onto a rag.
    3. Take off the spark plugs and shoot in a liberal amount of fogging oil in each cylinder. Turn it over by hand.
    4. Clean inside of boat out real good.
    5. Tarp it up and pray for May.

  5. #5
    Member LungShot's Avatar
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    Default

    wow - thats alot of stuff. Where do you get "fogger"?

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    Member Dupont Spinner's Avatar
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    Default

    I run a double mix of synthetic 2 stroke.....ie something like a 20 to 1 ratio instead of fog oil. I did it years ago and now I do it for all my inboards and has not failed me in over 22 years for boats or sleds.

    The other thing is to ensure you do not have water any where, ie lower unit, block, water pump. Easy way to ensure you are good is to remove lower unit...not neccessary but....this will let you put the unit indoors for the winter, check/change the water pump. I pack vasiline in the water pump, prevents dry/sticking impellers.(Must be a non pretrolum product!!!)

    If not removing the lower unit ensure it's down and dry so the lower gear case cannot gather water and freeze.(same reason to ensure you have no internal water)

  7. #7

    Default Fogger

    I got the fogger at the boat shop up the street. It was in a white can.

    Takes about an hour or so to do. It actually takes me longer to put the tarp on because I build a structure out of sawhorses and my canoe to keep the snow from caving in the tarp.

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dupont Spinner View Post
    I pack vasiline in the water pump, prevents dry/sticking impellers.(Must be a non pretrolum product!!!)
    I'm almost positive that vasoline is a petroleum product. Some people just take the impeller for the winter so that it doesn't take a "set" just sitting in the outdrive (or wherever it is on an outboard).

  9. #9
    Member Dupont Spinner's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by skydiver View Post
    I'm almost positive that vasoline is a petroleum product. Some people just take the impeller for the winter so that it doesn't take a "set" just sitting in the outdrive (or wherever it is on an outboard).
    You are correct (sort of) vaseline's oil is mineral based. Vaseline is mineral oil, paraffin and microcrystalline waxes. Mineral oil is also used in Baby oil....mineral oil is not harmful to rubber products.

    Now I would not recommend using motor oil after your shower but that is your choice.

    I learned the vaseline thing from my grandfather, RIP, and I can never ever remember him replacing a water pump impeller, nor my Dad for that matter. Just them pulling the lowers off and packing the water pump with vaseline and I continue the same with success. As a last note on vaseline it melts at about skin temperature for those of you who are triva hounds.

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    Default 'winterizing' the impeller

    After better'n 30 years of owning boats & motors, I've never heard of this before. I've never done it. I've never replaced an impeller either. Interesting idea.

  11. #11
    Member Dupont Spinner's Avatar
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    Default

    I also used to do it when I was working in a marine repair shop. The reason being is you do not know how long the customer may leave the motor sit before use and that brand new impeller could get stuck and ruined 1st trip out.

    The place where this trick is real helpful is for those with I/O's with the water pumps attached to the engines. The pump always runs dry for a few seconds on startup. The 1st start of the season with a sticky dry impeller could leave you stranded later in the season.

    Again using vaseline will not attack the rubber impeller like regular grease or motor oil. I even use it to hold the key for the impeller in place. An easy quick, inexpensive, enviromentally friendly way to help extend the life of your impellers.

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    Default Impeller

    Very interesting. I know it just takes a split second to destroy an impeller. It all makes sense. I cringe every time I hear someone test fire their boat motor before launching.

    My I/O is being winterized as we speak. I'll ask if this is part of his normal 'package.' I carry an impeller along with other spare parts all the time. Wouldn't the addition of RV antifreeze to the engine's raw water cooling system protect the impeller?

  13. #13
    Member Dupont Spinner's Avatar
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    Default

    It depends on if the RV antifreeze evaporates or not. Most times there is enough to give some lube but don't bet on it......in the case of being stored indoors most get a dry start come spring.

    I guess the other good reason is I am looking at my impeller at least once a year. Most manufacturers specify a 1 to 2 year change interval. Next season will be my 5th and going strong.

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