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Thread: Diesel outboards

  1. #1

    Default Diesel outboards

    Does anyone have any experience or firsthand knowledge of diesel outboards?
    I saw Yanmar's 36 hp model on their website, but the weight of that motor is not listed in their specs. Also, I saw that Evinrude was coming out with 50 & 200 hp outboards that can run on diesel, kerosene, bio-diesel, and gasoline.
    Pretty intriguing to say the least.
    Wonder what the emissions would be as well as weight.
    Jim

  2. #2
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    Default interesting

    Now there is one great idea, and I hope it all works out well. I know nothing of their specs, etc, except that when I inquired about a Yanmar diesel in my RHIB it was going to be $34,000, plus or minus. A tad more than a 150 hp Honda....

  3. #3
    Member Sobie2's Avatar
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    I can't speak to price, but the D27 weight is 207lbs and the D36 is 256lbs. I found a place on the net which date is unknown but the price for the D36 was/is $11,500 US... it was an engineering student analysis. To me that says you can buy a lot of fuel and a extra motor or two for the price... of course you wouldn't have the cool factor or the hauling capability if you had one of these babies on the Kenai with their 35 hp limit.

    Sobie2
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  4. #4

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    Well, the 36 Yanmar would fall in the weight range of the Yamaha 50 4-stroke. The price seems excessive though. Seems like the special e-tecs would be a better bet, especially since they're gonna be able to burn diesel, gas, kerosene with the flip of a switch. Only thing is that it seems like those are slated for military use initially.
    Jim

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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Jim View Post
    Well, the 36 Yanmar would fall in the weight range of the Yamaha 50 4-stroke. The price seems excessive though. Seems like the special e-tecs would be a better bet, especially since they're gonna be able to burn diesel, gas, kerosene with the flip of a switch. Only thing is that it seems like those are slated for military use initially.
    Jim
    Evinrude's been producing those outboards for the military for several years now and that's why they were developed. They've also been hinting about releasing them to the public as well, but I watched for years until I gave up on them. I figure the motors have 'issues' that aren't worked out yet and aren't consumer-ready, or their's some kind of perceived or real technology v. military v. government contract conflict going on, or the price will be so high that nobody will want to buy one after all. The good news is that the motors weigh about the same as a standard gasoline motor if I recall. Don't hold yer breath waitin' ... Buy a Cummins-Mercruiser Quantum diesel with a 2nd generation Alpha One sterndrive instead

    Brian

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    There was a diesel OB some years back.....Italian I believe....brand was Ruggerini or some such.....there was a dealer in Anchorage....they didn't go over well....I don't remember anything about performance or starting etc....

  7. #7

    Default Not big on I/O's

    I've worked on boats with I/O's and it seems like no matter how meticulous you are (maintenance), there's always something that potentially can be costly to fix. I think nowdays, there's no reason to not go with 4 stroke outboards, especially on a bracket or extended transom:
    1. I've never had an experience where ANY outboard repair came even close in cost to that of an I/O issue. (seems like powerheads are a common replacement issue, but why? We've had outboards my whole life and never had to replace a powerhead; why do they go "bad"?
    2. Why waste inside deck room for a motor box?
    3. A lot can be said for tilting motors out of the water, especially if the boat is moored or slipped. (Also, when's the last time you tried untangling line from the prop on a I/O? Can you say, "COLD water"?
    4. Seems a shame to sink a boat cause of the cutout in the transom for the I/O; seals, etc. i.e. water intrusion. The guy I used to deckhand for always told me: "boats are ALWAYS sinking, you just gotta figure out how it's going down"
    5. My thinking could be askewed, but aren't the newer 4 stokes (fuel injected) about as good on fuel consumption?
    I'm sure there are as many positive reasons for an I/O by those who have them, but many used boats you see advertised with an I/O have these common words: "outdrive needs repair" or "outdrive has been re-built".
    No thanks, dump that anchor, gain interior room, and get some outboards on a bracket. All that being said, I will not be one bit surprised if I end up with an I/O that was just too good to pass up!
    Now what does all this have to do with diesel outboards? Sorry!

  8. #8
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    I can't see the benefit of inboards until the boat is large enough that the engine is entirely below deck. At that size they are price competitive and the fuel savings start to be realized, but with say your nominal under 30' cabin cruiser, o/b's are IMHO the best way to go considering fuel economy, reliability and efficient use of boat space.

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