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Thread: Lab Male, 2yrs old.

  1. #1
    Member AKArcher's Avatar
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    Exclamation Lab Male, 2yrs old.

    I have a young lab that I was given back in May that has me completely baffled.

    I own a duplex, and the downstairs carpet is the original carpet from when I bought it 2+ yrs ago. The Mother In Law apartment has been open for the last 4 months, and every time (minus a few) he has been down there, he has both #1 and #2. I kept him out of the house for the rest of the summer because I thought it was because he hadn't been taught not to. As of late, it has been getting a little bit chilly, so I would let him in the arctic entry; He didn't do either 1 or 2 for about a month. So last week I let him come in to the house, and nothing...all night long, and up til 9am. Nothing at all.

    Today I was doing some work in the apartment, and he went down there... I mean no more than 20 minutes, and sure enough he did both again.

    Is it safe to assume that because animals were down there in the past, and more than likely have done the 1 and 2 on the carpet, he feels compelled to do the same?

    I will also note that he knows the command "Numbers" (something I taught him so my kids could tell him to go to the bathroom with out being out of line) and he goes to the same spot all the time.

    Please give me some advice, this is the 5th time that I need to go rent a carpet shampooer.

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    Default Why?

    Why do you keep testing him? Why are you not being pro-active and keeping him out of that area? Why would you assume that a habit was broken because he did not behave the same way one time?
    Yes, some dog in the past probably marked the area. Cleaning the carpet won't help much for 2 reasons. 1, if the area has a pad and is on plywood, it is difficult to get rid of the smell. 2, you have let him build a bad habit.
    This is not a loaded question. Have you punished the dog? Personally I would make that area a place he did not want to be. What have you done to correct the behavior? What are you willing to do?
    I would keep him out of the area when I was not there to monitor his every move. I would punish him whether I caught him in the act or not. No, I do not rub their noses in it. Normally a dog does not want to soil their sleeping area. He may already have changed his mind about that already, but you might kennel him in that area.
    Air him more often. Put him on a lead in the house. Keep him by your side constantly, or make him stay on a dog bed or specific location.

  3. #3
    Member AKArcher's Avatar
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    Angry Are you kidding?

    First off, I am not tempting him, he slipped down into the apartment. Secondly, I didn't assume the habit was broke, I said I noticed he hadn't soiled anywhere else in the building...upstairs, stairwell or arctic entry for over a month...which is every day for a month. Are you assuming I am letting him go down there and do his business?

    Like I said, I was in and out of the apartment doing some maintenance. Almost 100% of the time, I close the door behind me; yesterday and in the past he sometimes slips in with out me noticing.

    How am I letting him build a bad habit???? Are you assuming I am not doing any thing about it?

    As far as punishment, his nose went into the spots, then he went into his kennel in the arctic entry. No beating, just scolding.

    I would like to hope that when someone posts a question like I did, that people can respond with a little kooth...not attacking them with assumptions or accusations about why they tempt their dogs to do wrong.
    When all else fails...ask your old-man.


    AKArcher

  4. #4

    Default Whoa, ok.

    Whoa. You have to take AK River Rats comments in passing. Yes, he asked a lot of questions and mentioned a few things. They may have appeared blunt. But there was good advice there. You just needed to pull it out.

    First I would ask about your dogs obedience. Does he mind you to a T or is he kinda laxed about it. How busy is your lifestyle? Most times dogs will act out because they are not getting the attention. Or there is a sudden shift of how much time you use to spend with them. A change in your schedule may offset your dog as well. Dogs are reluctant to change just as we are. They act out just as we do. When a child acts out you reinforce with obedience. The same for a dog. Start doing some obedience drills in your home and off premise. Doing so will have you spending quality time with your dog and get proper behavior from your dog. Ak River Rat is right in about watching your dog more. This will enable you to catch him in the act of disobedience. Dogs live in the moment ;so putting your dogs nose in a pile he made 30 minutes ago is going to be pointless. You have to make corrections as the dog is exhibiting unwanted behavior. Whether it be pulling on the leash or soiling your house. Also when you send your dog out to go potty go out with him. Get him into playing or retrieving. Excercising will induce a bile movement if he needs to.
    Stay vigilant over him. You are his pack leader and it is up to you to teach him what is good behavior and what is not.

  5. #5
    Member Huntress's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AKArcher View Post

    As far as punishment, his nose went into the spots, then he went into his kennel in the arctic entry. No beating, just scolding.
    Hi Archer,

    I would like to point out that in the dog world putting his nose in it wont do any good. They dont understand that action.
    Another thing, the crate is supposed to be a positive situation for your dog, NEVER use the crate as punishment.
    One thing I can say that has worked for me in the past, was while cleaning up the mess I was sure my dog was watching. The whole time cussing, grumbling, growling and yelling at the pile of poo or wet spot. Never once directing it toward the dog. For some reason they seem to know that something was wrong, that I wasnt happy and in the mean time your not causing your dog any undo mental harm.
    All the other advise you have been given is great advise! OB is certainly your first concern at this point and not giving him the chance to mess up. In my world there is no such thing as a bad dog, just bad owners!
    (I mean that light hearted)

  6. #6
    Member AKArcher's Avatar
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    Default

    I would like to apologize River Rat for taking your comments the way I did. I will admit I didn't get any of your positive advice because of the way I took your blunt questions.

    Let me explain this...just a little better.

    I picked up the dog from a friend who had the dog dropped on him. He wasn't getting any attention, and I needed a companion as I was going through a divorce.

    I played with him and walked with him before and after work and sometimes during lunch for a total of 3 hrs a day. During the summer he stayed outside, but after the first week of Sept, he started coming into the arctic entry. The attention was dropping off as I have been remodeling a few things before it gets too cold, but all in all he still gets to play with his dog-obie at least 3 or 4 times a day. I had him cut in Aug, he wouldn't stay home for 2 min if left outside, now that has changed after the snip.

    As far as watching him, I watch him all the time when he is in the house( not including the stairwell or Arctic Entry. He follows me where ever I am...I mean right under my hand. So for him to do "numbers" in the house is completely out of character. In fact, when I noticed that he was in the stair well and not in the entry, I opened the door and he came out with his tail between his legs. So I think he knows what he did was wrong. And BTW, he was outside running with my neighbors lab-mix pup for about 2 hrs prior to the latest incident. So it wasn't like he was kept from his area. Which by the way I do go out with him when he goes... that is when I exercise him.

    Huntress: I think if it happens again, (I do try to keep him out of the apartment, even when it isn't rented.) I will do the cleaning up thing where I get mad at the mess and not him. Thanks for that opinion.


    Wetlands / AK RiverRat: I am going to buy him a bed for inside, the house. Being a lab he sheds quite a bit, and I would prefer he be in one area.

    Thanks again,
    When all else fails...ask your old-man.


    AKArcher

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    Default My bad archer

    I sometimes rush to the point not taking into account all the nuances I do not know and forget about others perceptions. Your first re-post to me was fair and understandable. Your apology was gracious and is accepted.
    Over a lot of years, two of the toughest things for me to do has been to get people to be consistent, and stop "testing". Sure there are lots of others, but those are people traits, not dog traits, and I can't pinch their ears to gain an understanding.
    Mostly you sound like you are on the right track. Your partner may have picked up bad habits from the previous owner, there may be some separation issues going on, he may even be testing you a bit too. Labs can be devilishly sneaky, and once they start doing something, may keep trying at any cost.
    A story on myself. I had a male lab, lanky, tall, who just loved to eat off the counter. He did not even have to stretch to reach the food. He got good at it. I could not catch him. He took some punishment, but to no avail. Finally, I set a trap. I piled up every piece of tupperware, pans, baking sheets and other misc. stuff on top of the counter and laid in some goodies. Off to bed we went. Middle of the night the whole contraption hit the floor like a derailed freight train. I met him coming down the hallway faster than a scalded cat. Back to the kitchen we went, and no, not willingly on his part. I waded in kicking the pans and pile and screaming bloody murder. He took more than a few swats with the whiffle ball bat that I brought. After that day you could not entice him into the kitchen for love or gravy.
    Point is the bad habit continued to grow as I "nickel and dimed" a correction. I am not advocating you get rough with the dog. I am advocating positive measures that strictly limit his opportunities to fail and a system of correction that gets his attention if he does.
    Thanks again for continuing to communicate with us/me about your dog. This is a great forum and place to share and learn. Kind of like an old dog, I needed to be reminded about the rules.

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