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Thread: Illuminated Recticle

  1. #1
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    Default Illuminated Recticle

    Are there regulations barring Illuminated recticles while hunting in Alaska?

  2. #2
    Member MARV1's Avatar
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    Default

    Never saw one before, lots of different scopes around that have them. I have 2 of them that utilize illuminated by battery and one that glows.
    The emphasis is on accuracy, not power!

  3. #3
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    As long as the scope does not project a light it is legal.
    Tennessee

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    Default light restrictions

    The 2007 Handy Dandy reg book, page 15, lists restrictions. Artificial lights are listed as is enhanced night vision scopes. Unless somebody can quote something different from the BIG book, F&G and Enforcement interpretations in the past were that lighted sights were illegal.
    The same question came up years ago in the Archery arena about sights that use batteries to enhance the pins. I do not see anything in the reg book about lights only being illegal if they "project".
    A lighted reticle would only be an advantage at night or extremely low light conditions. It appears that the regulations are set to prohibit that advantage.

  5. #5
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    Default Legal

    I have Trijicon scopes on my rifles, require no batteries, project no light........there used to be some questions and I was told, as recently as 6 years ago, that illuminated reticles were legal as long as their was no battery power........this, too, has changed and all are legal as long as no light is projected toward or on the target as Snowwolfe has previously stated.

    Joe
    Where there's a hobble, there's hope.

  6. #6
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    As far as I understand it, there is nothing against using a lighted sight on firearms such as a red dot or illuminated reticle, because these don't shine a light on the target. Now, a laser light would be illegal, as well as a flashlight, or any other light that illuminates the target (game in this case). It means that you can't use the lights from your ATV, car, etc., to take a shot a game, but you can use moonlight or sunlight because these are natural lights.

  7. #7
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    Default Illuminated vs absorbing

    I am not familiar with Trijicon sights. What I am familiar with are pins or sights that absorb and reflect natural light. Those are not considered to be "artificial light" or "electronically enhanced", and therefore are not restricted. If Trijicon and similar sights do the same, then they are not artificial by definition. If they use a non-natural power source then they would fall into the artificial light category.
    For instance, night vision scopes do not cast a light. They use a power source to enhance light, therefore are considered artificial.
    Somebody would have to show me a quote from the official regulation book and/or a written explanation by law enforcement or the DA to explain why a battery powered source of light in a sight would be acceptable and not restricted by statute. Remember, the Handy Dandy is just an excerpt of the whole reg book.
    Just a note, several year back in FAI a hunter shot a moose late in the evening. Enforcements position was that it could not be done at the time the hunter said due to it being dark (no moon) and that the reflection from the city lights made it possible. Therefore, artificial light was used. I do not recall the final outcome of that event.

  8. #8
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    I did email F&G about this years ago and there answer was as long as the scope did not project a light it was legal to use.
    Red dots are fine, a sight that projects the red dot onto the animal is not.
    Tennessee

  9. #9
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    My Trijicons are all sporting scopes.......the Tritium used for illuminating is a natural element found in nature, nothing artificial about it........the battery powered rule was a number of years ago & I was in a camp where a hunter removed his battery powered scope after asking a F&G official if he was legal......that has changed. The Trijicon scope also uses fiber optics for daytime illumination .

    Joe
    Where there's a hobble, there's hope.

  10. #10
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    Default current Enforcement interpretation

    I went to F&G today to look in the "bible". There is no difference in the verbage as compared to the Handy Dandy. I called Enforcement this morning and talked with L. Dahlke. You guys are correct, a sight system on a firearm that is electronically enhanced (excluding night vision) but does not project a beam or a light is ok to use for hunting in AK.
    For archery, no electronics or artificial lights on the sight system or bow are allowed. Naturally enhanced sights (fiber optics) are ok to use.
    Great communications from everybody. Thanks for helping me out. Now I guess I need to ask somebody why the disparity between firearms and bows.

  11. #11
    Mark
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    Default

    I thank all you guys who posted in this thread. I'm looking at a scope to buy for a winter snowmobile rifle and it features an illuminated reticle. I wasn't sure if it's legal or not, so I used the search function and found this thread.

    Again, thanks!

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