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Thread: Sea Ducking

  1. #1
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    Default Sea Ducking

    Heres some pictures I took today while sea duck hunting...

    Let me know what ya'll think, I need feedback, trying to get good at this

    They can be seen in this post...

    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ad.php?t=19567

  2. #2
    Member akhunter3's Avatar
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    Red X's.....





    Jon

  3. #3
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    fixed two of em....

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    Here is my favorite so far...


  5. #5
    Member Hunt'N'Photos's Avatar
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    Still showing up as red x's. The picture you posted is pretty decent compositionally, but the lighting is rather harsh. When I got started the hardest part was learning what not to photograph rather than learning how to make something look better. Really great scenes are actually really easy to photograph and make look good, but bad situtations are tough. Thats not to say that they can't be done well, but it takes alot of knowledge and work on your part before you even fire the shutter.
    US Air Force - retired and Wildlife photographer

    To follow my photography adventures check out my facebook page

  6. #6
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    Can you explain to me what you mean by harsh lighting? (knew to this so I'm trying to learn whatever I can from those who are good at this )

  7. #7
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    Harsh lighting in some cases is the very dark and hard shadow lines that show up all the time in Sun lit scenes. In this case it shows up as the extreme range of brightness between the dark and shadowed foreground and the bright sky overhead. Also the reflection on the water adds to the brightness areas. Automatic camera meters have a hard time with this and usually underexpose.

    What you have is a very bright but still slightly underexposed sky with a very dark and underexposed foreground. The easiest thing to do would be to add a stop or two of positive exposure compensation when you have so much brightness in the image. There will be areas that might go too bright, and completely was out doing this, but usually in sky areas that can be acceptable. You can so this after the fact in photo editing software too, but it generally is easier and better to do it in camera.

    Or you could just crop the dark areas off and make the sky the primary feature.
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  8. #8
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    Heres the orignal before I tweaked it...


    I think the orignall looks to washed out....Maybe the flat light kinda days we get?
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