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Thread: Halibut from Kayak

  1. #1
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    Default Halibut from Kayak

    Anyone out there landed a Halibut from a sea kayak?I'm all geared up to do it (with a partner).Could you give me any clues of where we can find some in reasonably shallow water,the fishing dosn't have to be red hot,it would be an event for the both of us.Thanks and happy paddling

  2. #2
    Moderator Alaskacanoe's Avatar
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    Default This guy did OK

    http://www.sitnews.us/0904news/09200...4_halibut.html
    This is from 2004 season.
    Seems like alot of fun, this guy has a great smile about his adventure.
    I wanna see what you guys do.
    thinking about spots to fish from your Kayak..
    on a calm day, I would try the Kelp beds off the shore between Homer and Anchor point. I caught a 100 lb Halibut right near the shore in this area. I could see the fish when we floated over it and I jigged for it from my 16 foot Lund.

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    Moderator Alaskacanoe's Avatar
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    Default Kayak fishing site


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    Member Ripface's Avatar
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    Default

    Man, you're a champ! People used to freak out when I fished muskies in my kayak. I think I'm going to have to do this also. Maybe it will give me incentive to get the Hobie kayak with foot pedals (and a sail option).

  5. #5

    Default Spit Butts

    Several years ago the Homer News had a story about a gent that caught a 80 lb. halibut just off the Homer Spit. You will just have to pick the right day and tides. Also, try the close in area of Passage Canal in Whittier in Aug. and Sept. Halibut and silvers are in close by then and you will not have to travel out so far. Good Luck, SeaULater

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    Default kayaks

    What brand of kayak is recommend/use for this type of fishing?
    What benefits does a kayak give over a canoe?

    I'm moving to AK this fall and want to pick up a versitle, one-man boat that I can use on as many different types of waters as possible.

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    Default Kayaks Rock!

    For a start,its much easier to keep water out of a Kayak than a canoe!Sea Kayaks are really best in the sea,lake or some times rivers if there arn't too swift or shallow.I've floated portage creek number two in my boat several times.The biggest worry with a sea kayak in a river is getting jammed sidways and rolling over,not enough water to wet exit but enough water force to keep you from righting yourself with a paddle.Kayaking in best done in pairs or groups and floating rivers is best done when you have a bit of experiance.On the topic of fishing from one,I've had a bit of luck trolling for silvers from mine and back home done a lot of sea fishing from a Sea Kayak.I've even shot up mobs of Feral goats with a Mini 14 from one.In short its my favorite watercraft but now i'm looking for a Jon boat for the swift rivers.Take it easy and thanks for the fishing advise,I'll post photos when I catch one,and catch one I will!

  8. #8
    Moderator Alaskacanoe's Avatar
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    Default What type of Kayak?

    IMHO - I believe that Safety and comfort are the first concerns when it comes to Boating of any kind.
    I have done a little research on trying to find the best all around Kayak for Alaska, and just like the threads on " What is the best all around Motor boat for Alaska" . It just is not possible to find that one perfect boat for all situations, and places.
    Sea Kayaks are designed for just that, and offer the long range cababilities and big water safety. I have a couple of 17.5 ft Kayaks in Fiberglass that I use when heading to Seward, or Homer , or Whittier.
    huge airtight bulkheads for gear, but is all this important when I just want to paddle around and fish a mile or so area for a day?
    No its not, and the smaller play type boats work pretty good for surfing around and short shot trips in the Fjords.
    For rivers that have sharp bends and stuff to dodge, I like a Kayak that is shorter than 12 ft. I have a tandem Kayak that is about that long, but I don't enjoy tandem Kayaking as much as a solo.
    I use a 9 ft play type Kayak for the rivers, and I take it along on my trips on the motor boat to play in the protected areas and coves in the ocean.
    I think that you can make about any Kayak work for you. Decide a few things when you go looking at Kayaks.
    Comfort, do you fit the seat and is the opening the right size for you to move around alittle. Do you need a bulkhead to store things in? are you going to go camping with your Kayak? can it carry what you think you need? Is it a proven stable platform?, Weight of the craft, is this important to you? Some Kayaks weigh 35 lbs and some weigh 90 lbs or more. can you mount a rod holder and strap some stuff to the outside for easy reach? Are you going to look great in this ride?
    One item that I take with me know on all ocean trips is my GoreTex Immersion suit by "Kokatat". it is comfortable and may save from being uncomfortable.
    here is a view of several all purpose recreational Kayaks.
    the list can go on forever, but just have fun looking and deciding what you think will best suit your desires and needs.
    I know that my friend loves the Old town Loon. it is pictured at the bottom. and is a inexpensive but very nice craft.


    Eddyline Equinox
    www.eddyline.com
    Length: 14'
    Width: 25"
    Weight: 45 lbs
    Material: Carbonlite 2000 (thermoformed)
    Price: $1,849

    Perception Rhythm 14.0
    www.kayaker.com
    Length: 14'
    Width: 24"
    Weight: 42 lbs
    Material: Airalite (thermoformed)
    Price: $1,600

    Ocean Kayak Venus 11
    www.oceankayak.com
    Length: 10' 8"
    Width: 28"
    Weight: 40 lbs
    Material: Polyethylene (rotomolded)
    Price: $529

    Bell Canoe Rob Roy
    www.bellcanoe.com
    Length: 15'
    Width: 25.5"
    Weight: 30 lbs
    Material: KevLight (composite layup)
    Price: $2,195


    Bic Yakka

    Length: 9' 4"
    Width: 30"
    Weight: 48.5 lbs
    Material: Polyethylene hull
    Price: $599



    ENLARGELoon 111 ClassicPHOTOS 1, 2 Loon 111 Classic Length11' 1" / 3.4 m Width28" / 71.1 cm Cockpit17" x 55" / 43.1 x 139.7 cm Depth14" / 35.6 cm Weight45 lbs / 20.4 kg Capacity275 lbs / 124.7 kg Suggested Retail$589.00 US

  9. #9
    Member jmg's Avatar
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    Default Sit on top Yaks

    I moved up to Alaska 2 years ago from California. I got into kayakfishing down there from some friends and had a blast with it. Although I never got a halibut, I did land some striped bass and rockfish out of mine. The stripers were a blast and I imagine somewhat like silver salmon will be up here. I have a sit on top kayak made by Wilderness Systems. It is called "The Ride." It is 13.5 feet long and I believe about 30 or so inches wide. Very stable. I repeat, very stable. I have actually stood up on it before. I wouldn't do it much in the ocean fishing, although I do know people in texas use this kayak as a platform to fish for red snook (?) on the flats. Very stable. I hope to get out in mine this year for some silvers. Probably around the Whittier area, but getting out around Homer would be nice also. Do a search on this yak and read about it. It is not the fastest yak by any means and I would not want to paddle it several miles. If that is the plan, go with something quicker. A friend of mine had a Hobie, I think the Mirage, that had foot peddles too. That would nice when the arms are tired, plus he could sort of 'troll' while fishing too. Good luck.

  10. #10
    Member Ripface's Avatar
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    Default

    I'm thinking I'll bring my kayak out to Homer next time I'm down there, paddle it out from the end of the spit a good 100+ yards, and drop my line in for halibut. I figure I can get me a salmon head from the fillet station dumpster for bait. Then I'll set the reel on clicker and wait. I used to fish this way on the Texas coast for big redfish, sharks and sting rays. Should be interesting. I have some "mud weights" from Texas that should keep my line from drifting with the tide, and keep it in place.
    "Wine can of their wits the wise beguile, Make the sage frolic, and the serious smile." - Homer, Odyssey

  11. #11
    Moderator Alaskacanoe's Avatar
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    Default Kelp bed Halibut

    I talked to a couple of guys today that were putting in up at Lower Skilak. they had two of the new MOKAI powered Kayak type boats. They flat love them. http://www.mokai.com/
    They both had been to Homer and had spent a couple of days talking to the fellows camping next to them about fishing in 30 feet of water and over the kelp beds. These guys have been catching Halibut this way for years. they use a small skiff and just wait for the weather to permit, and they go jigging with lighter tackle in the shallows around Homer..
    anyway.. people are having success. the wind didn't permit them to fish from the MOKAI's, but they said they will be back and hope for calm seas.

    Max

  12. #12
    Member Riptide's Avatar
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    Default Halibut from a Kayak

    I've caught lots of halibut from a kayak ~ jigging. My recomendation is to use no more than 25# test line so you can choose to break off a big one rather than finding yourself in a bind. Keep the drag light in the begining in case you get an unexpected whopper of a bite ~ which might tip you over of it catches you off guard.

    Since I fish for smaller halibut, prefering 10 pounders or so, I can gaff or whack them with a short club once on surface.

    If your going after bigger fish I'd suggest you use a powerboat so you can have ice etc.. for keeping lots of meat.

  13. #13
    Member Ripface's Avatar
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    Default Homer kelp beds

    Pardon my naivety on this area, but could someone give me a general idea of where these kelps beds are, and the size of them? I know I've seen kelp when I leave the port from Homer, on my way to catch halibut from the typical commercial boats, but that one "commercial" route is almost the extent of my knowledge of Homer waters (out to Perl Island). I would like to poke around in them and see if I can winch up some fish.
    "Wine can of their wits the wise beguile, Make the sage frolic, and the serious smile." - Homer, Odyssey

  14. #14

    Default

    I believe the kelp beds are between Homer and Anchor Point off of the bluffs. Not sure on the depth.

  15. #15
    Moderator Alaskacanoe's Avatar
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    Default kelp beds

    The kelp beds I have fished from are as mentioned are located between homer and Anchor point.
    the depth is about 40 feet.
    I have seen fish over 100 lbs in the kelp beds.
    Max
    When you come to a fork in the trail, take it!

    Rentals for Canoes, Kayaks, Rafts, boats serving the Kenai canoe trail system and the Kenai river for over 15 years. www.alaskacanoetrips.com

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