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Thread: Mokai

  1. #1
    Member alaska bush man's Avatar
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    Question Mokai

    Who has a Mokai?

    How do you like it?
    Alaska

  2. #2
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    Default Do Not Buy a Mokai!!!

    The Mokai motorized kayak concept is a reasonable watercraft crossover. In short... it comes up way far distant of a good quality boat.

    The hull is convincingly robust & heavy duty construction to tackle routine abuse.

    Unfortunately, it uses an air-cooled, under performing power plant with a wimpy driveshaft, flimsy components, with a “pointlessly” exceedingly deafening clatter. All this translates to a poor power to weight ratio slug that is… well… sluggish and noisy. This moreover establishes a major lack of performance/efficiency and introduces various safety concerns under load.

    I suppose I could list more details… but the Mokai product “as is” from the factory is not even worth the time to re-invent the conception.

    With optimism, I would look forward to the Mokai manufacturer looking at these shortcomings and revealing some genuine improvements on otherwise a great niche boat idea.

  3. #3
    Member steelguy's Avatar
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    Talking got 3

    Jeff,
    I've got 3 and for my intended use, they are absolutely fabulous! Fishing in the southeast Alaska, the river banks are just about impossible to hike through due to the thick underbrush, plus, you always have to be concerned with bears. Trust me, I did for many years, and kept wondering if there wasn't a better way. Well, Mokai is it!

    I live on the east coast, about an 45 minutes from the factory in Newburgh, NY, and they were good enough to lend one out for a weekend of test driving. I was initially concerned about the overall power after our testing, but my friend and I decided to buy 2 and ship them up to Alaska. Mokai helped us with the whole shipping process, too.

    The learning curve was short, and, assuming the on-coming current was less than 7 miles an hours, which in almost all cases it is, headway was comfortably made. If it was more, we simply got out and pulled a tow line attached to the bows around the rougher stretches. We learned to hop scotch behind big boulders and pick our way up seams. We consistently got where we wanted to go, in some cases what originally took by foot upwards of 4 hours of exhausting, sweat-soaked hours, now in just 30 minutes. Going down stream was a total breeze and a pleasure! A huge added bonus was realized also: previously, with all that hiking, every other day was spent in the cabin sleeping, flat out bushed. Now we fish everyday, all day, and even go sightseeing in the evenings. Plus, they are very efficient on gas consumption, a full 2-1/2 gal tank lasting at least 5 hours of steady running.

    This is not to say our Mokai's have not had problems, most of which have been mechanical. But, I must say, Mokai have stood behind their boats 100% and gone out of their way to immediately correct any problems. And, this past spring I managed to flip mine, totally submerging it for at least 5 seconds, which was kind of hairy. Took the engine out, bailed out the boat, dried things as best I could, and it started right back up. With the engine having been upside down, the oil did eventually foul the plug and stall, but I did manage to goet back to the cabin. There in the warm cabin, I again took everything apart, and next day it was fine. Takes a beating and keeps on ticking! So, a year ago we bought a third, for guests.

    Feel free to PM me and I'll answer any questions you might have.
    Steelguy
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  4. #4

    Default

    I have had mine for 5 years, I own 3.

    I have gone many places that without this little boat I would not have made it there.

    It runs on the rotten ice making you the first one out, and in the fall it will break ice about 3 inches thick making you the last one out.

    No boat does everything, they all have thier best uses.

    As for as problems all mechanical things break it by the way a Honda.

    Being almost deaf the noise is no problem for me. I see people running Mud Buddy's, air boats they wear ear protection...so they most be noisy.

    If you want a jet ski this is not it, this is a little boat that gets great gas mileage travels in some skinny water, is fun to run, safe for the kids to play in, easy to haul around, easy to work on if you have to.

    There are many here in Alaska being used, most people who have them love them, a few felt like Brian and have sold them to other people who love their little boats.

    I am now the factory rep here in Alaska.

    I would not sell anything just for money, you can ask the customers who need help in repair I don't charge them a service charge when thier boat is past its warranty, I love these little jet boats and want people to be as happy with theirs as I am with mine.

    Would be happy to answer any questions or get you out in one.

    Cheers,
    Andy

  5. #5
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    Default

    Can you put a larger motor in one, and if so, at what speed does the boat feel too squirrelly? Does anyone offer high power kits? And would the rest of the drive hold up to the additional power? Surely someone has been experimenting -- Their outline looks like a skinny hydrofoil.

    There are a number of Alaskan rivers running in excess of 10 mph, like parts of the Copper, Chitina & Nizina, and if it's not substantially faster than that it would be a long ride upstream. Using a GPS, I clocked 17 MPH on one section of the Kennecott River last summer. I want to go *up* that stuff.

  6. #6

    Default

    Jim,

    There are a number of people working on putting a larger motor in one.

    I have tried a number of things to increase power myself but have yet to find the answer.

    The boat was not designed for what we here in Alaska are asking it to do.

    We seem to be working it harder than the people in the lower 48 proof of this is the number of wear rings being used here as compared to there.

    Hopefully by the spring I will get to test one with a 300 Kawasaki engine.

    Cheers,
    Andy

  7. #7
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    Thumbs up Mokai boats

    Brian you have two at AR&K that were used as rentals, I would check them out to see if they need some repairs or fine tuning.

    I got to take one out for a few days and had no problems, they went where my boat could not go.

    No boat does it all but the Mokai did what I expected it to. I knew that I was not getting in a jet ski.

    I met the factory rep when I returned the boat to the rental company, he was making some changes to the rental fleet, and had designed and built a windshield to keep the customers drier on the trips down river.

    He even ask me if I would like to take the 4 hour trip with the windshield to see how it shed the water when you went through the 4 foot rollers.

    At no charge I might add.

    When we got picked up at Trappers creek he gave me a coupon for a free days use of one with no expiration date said I could use it next year.

    Its on my Christmas list.

  8. #8

    Default mokai are the best

    I have owned 2 for the last two years. I will challenge anyone to go were I have taken these with any other type of boat Just like an airboat will go were nothing else will go. The previous post is right they are a specialy boat not for every one and they do require a little maintenance but let me put it into perspective all the items I have had to replace in the last two years have costed less than one tank of gas in a large jet boat. As far as noise, it is like your lawnmower it is not really that loud but if you put your ear 18" away from the exhaust after a wile with no ear protection it is going to iritate you. The speed is very slow I would love a bigger mokai with a bigger engine but for now this is the best there is. The factory service is the best. Excelent product support. I have absolutly abused my boat and it is still in good shape. This year I hunted moose up the jim river off the haul road. I took myself 220lbs and 100lbs of gear up river appx 14 miles from the bridge the only other way up there would be to tow a canoe and walk that would take a long time I was able to average about 4 miles per hr. I have owned a Jet Craft Yukon, a Wooldridge Deep Water Plus, Alumacraft skiff, an a 32' St Piere Dory. The mokai requires alot less maintenance than they did. I live in fairbanks feel free to contact me if you have questions. jeffryhti@acsalaska.net

  9. #9

    Default places mokais go

    here are a couple of pictures up the Jim river
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  10. #10
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Outriggers

    Would it be possible to put a couple outriggers on one to increase capacity and stability?

    I am thinking of the Sagauvanirktok and the Ivishak.

    Vietnam - June 70 - Feb. 72
    Cancer from Agent Orange - Aug. 25th 2012
    Cancer Survivor - Dec. 14th 2012

  11. #11

    Default stability

    stability is not a problem they are almost impossible to flip over they are very stable. As far as increasing the capacity? I think it just would not have enough horsepower to haul much more weight. The limit on a slow flowing alaska river with the wear sleeve in good shape and a full tank of fuel is about 350 to 360lbs total for upstream travel. 300lbs would be much better. This amount of weight is doable, sheep hunters go much lighter than that. I have never seen the ivashak or sag in the fall but when I have flown over it the rest of the year it looks like a very good Mokai river with hunting gear. I have heard of guys pulling plastic sleds behind them but I have never seen this or even know what kind of sled they are talking about. Plus I have my douts if you could haul any more weight. If you think of a Mokai as a jet boat you are going to be very dissapointed if you think of it as a kayak you will be happy. Even loaded with hunting gear it will still go much much faster than you can walk it.

  12. #12
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Thanks

    Thanks I will have to actually try one sometime. Getting to where others can't is a plus up here.

    Vietnam - June 70 - Feb. 72
    Cancer from Agent Orange - Aug. 25th 2012
    Cancer Survivor - Dec. 14th 2012

  13. #13

    Default valdez

    I work in valdez alot. had mine down there quite abit this summer. I had a top made for it so when I take it out in the ocean I dont get soaked. I also took it up the lowe river (just for something to do). Maybe next summer I could take you for a ride.

  14. #14

    Default Stability

    I was a little concerned about stability. After runnung mine for a few minutes in Flat smooth water I tried to tip it over. I don't think if you are sitting down in it you could tip it over. I couldn't. It would require some pretty severe wave action to be able to get it to flip. Mine is an older one with only the 5 hp engine. More speed would be great and I have been looking into alternatives ,but haven't tried any yet
    Could you post photos of the covers and windshields I have heard about?
    I am going to be in the market for 2 more Mokais this coming spring to take to my cabin at Flathorn Lake.
    Byron Miller

  15. #15
    Member steelguy's Avatar
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    Exclamation how I flipped my Mokai

    I mentioned in my previous post above that I flipped my Mokai. I can tell you it is possible, but not under normal circumstances. Normally, while going down river just above a bend in a particular river that leads directly into a logjam, I walk my boat tethered to a hand-held rope. Well, I scoped things out and thought if I ran it just right, I could get through this one section of rapids and hook quickly to the right towards the shore. That all went well until the hook right landed me on an unseen submerged log that angled up towards the surface. The boat slid up the log and continued to roll as my weight sifted, flipping me totally upside down. I remember actually hearing the motor continue to run while under and me fighting to pull the Mokai towards shallow water. Good most all of my gear was secured in one way or another to the boat, shotgun and backpack. Not so good, the tied on gear helped add resistance for the water to grab, and the hull being full of water made it all quite a challenge. On top of this, I knew I was getting closer to the log jam, so it was pull with everything I had, do or die. Although I smashed into one large bolder that left my thigh pretty bruised up, I fortunately managed to make it.

    So, it can happen, anything can happen, but Mokai's are real staple and can easily be stood up in on flat calm water. The hull width is 37", and your center of gravity is so low, but, wear a PFD and don't take unnecessary chances!

  16. #16

    Default flat horn and steelguy

    flathorn....I am working out of town will be home this thursday I will try to remember and take a picture of my top I will post it the following week when I have internet service again.

    steelguy...... just curios were in southeast you are using your Mokai's I lived in Juneau for two summers and took my Wooldridge boat all over the place but I remember several rivers I would have loved to have my Mokai's on.

  17. #17

    Default

    Here is a picture of the windshield I made it is the first one. I have changed it and made it slope back more will need to get a picture of it as well.

    You can see it at the Boat Show in the Northway mall.

    Slow reflection I would like to see your top too.
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  18. #18

    Default

    Here is a great picture of the Mokai on the water.Mt Edgecome.jpg

  19. #19

    Default

    Dave,

    Ivishak is super low at the braids, just FYI

  20. #20
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default I wonder

    Quote Originally Posted by TradBow View Post
    Dave,

    Ivishak is super low at the braids, just FYI
    I wonder if a simple canoe cart system could be adapted for low water areas.

    Vietnam - June 70 - Feb. 72
    Cancer from Agent Orange - Aug. 25th 2012
    Cancer Survivor - Dec. 14th 2012

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