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Thread: Best Canoe?

  1. #21
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    Default canoe lift

    I got my lift out of Fairbanks [FOUR SEASONS] SHIPED DOWN IN A BIKE BOX on the Buss. [cheepest way] I think if you post on this web site that you are looking for one the person that makes them in Fairbanks will answer you, you will also need a tiller handle for the outboard, will help you to install if you need help, if you can weld let you look at the one I have an make a copy
    give me a call Anchorage 677-9043 if I can help
    Sid

  2. #22
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    Default lift

    Quote Originally Posted by alaskantinbender
    Hello Sid,
    I have just found a 19 foot grumman myself. I put a 5hp briggs and straton on it. She will do 12 mph on a lake. It seems to have a hull speed about 8mph, takes about 1/3 throttle. To go faster it takes a lot more power but its plenty fast at 8mph. Where would you suggest I look for a lift? Plan to do some scouting/camping in the upper Knik arm around the mouth of the Knik river next week.

    Regards,

    Jim
    I use a 15 HP an on an wide open, need some weight in the front to keep it down I used to run the big sue , Lake louise ,an back in that country as well as along the Denali Hiway chitna an any outher water that looked good

  3. #23
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    Default

    Thanx for the info. I will post on the wanted forum and see what happens.
    Im at work now but will fly back in Anc next thu night. What is the chance of geting a look see next friday?? I normally stay in a hotell thu night in Anc as I get in late, then drive back to my cabin near Wasilla on friday

    Regards,

    Jim

  4. #24
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    Default

    Forgot to ask,
    Did you go across the Knik arm from Anchorage to the Sue or start on the Parks? I Live about 15 miles down the KGB road near Knik Lake. I have thought about putting in near the old Nike site and going up both the little and big Sue from there.

    Regards,

    Jim

  5. #25
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by alaskantinbender
    Forgot to ask,
    Did you go across the Knik arm from Anchorage to the Sue or start on the Parks? I Live about 15 miles down the KGB road near Knik Lake. I have thought about putting in near the old Nike site and going up both the little and big Sue from there.

    Regards,

    Jim
    Bad news on large open water when the waves are 17 FT from creast to crest it is tuff, the little sue is ok from the HIWAY or burma the big sue is
    great fron any place along the road put in at the road motor down but not reccomend salt water all thoe I have used it off the homer spit in passed years in good weather, if you ever cross lake louies ,an back in that country you will have to start out early in the AM waves later in the day same in the big lakes down south SID

  6. #26
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sid
    Bad news on large open water when the waves are 17 FT from creast to crest it is tuff, the little sue is ok from the HIWAY or burma the big sue is
    great fron any place along the road put in at the road motor down but not reccomend salt water all thoe I have used it off the homer spit in passed years in good weather, if you ever cross lake louies ,an back in that country you will have to start out early in the AM waves later in the day same in the big lakes down south SID
    give me a call in FRI AM 8 to 9 AM
    677-9043 I live in Spenard [LAKE HOOD}

  7. #27
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    Default

    Great info Sid,

    I will call you next fri morning.

    Regards,

    Jim

  8. #28

    Smile Old Town is my choice!

    I came into canoeing when I moved to Northern Maine. I lived for a few (too few) just off of the Alagash River and picked an Old Town Discovery 169 from a guy who needed money and I had some. Over the next few summers that canoe and I plunged over some of the most intense rapids in the country. The Old Town is almost unsinkable and hauls a ton of gear. I have made many, many multi day trips pushing the ability of my boat beyond what it should be able to withstand but it was always ready for more!

    I took a job a few years back with Alaska-BLM doing backcountry patrols on the Delta and Gulkana rivers and they to use the same old town but the Tripper model. No problems including many trips down Gulkana Canyon/falls fully loaded. I like-um!

    Walt

    Northwest Alaska Backcountry Rentals’
    Kotzebue
    www.northwestalaska.com

  9. #29
    Moderator Alaskacanoe's Avatar
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    Default Discovery Old Town

    very tough canoe that 169 discovery. Old town did a good job with the Poly link material.

  10. #30
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    Default

    I build my own canoes. I have a 14 foot and am currently working on a 20 foot. It is real simple to do and gives me something to do on rainy days in Sitka.

    If you are interested in building one check out the book "Building a Strip plank Canoe by GIL GILPATRICK.

  11. #31
    Moderator Alaskacanoe's Avatar
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    Default Building your own

    Building one yourself, and then using is something only a few people have the patience and skills to do.
    A nice warm Garage or work area big enough for winter time would be a very big priority.
    Do you have any pictures?
    It would be nice to see your canoes being built in stages.
    If you don't mind, and have a digital cameral I think you could really make alot of people very interested in your craft.
    Here is a link to Gil's book and website for his other outdoor equipment and guiding books.
    http://gilgilpatrick.com/strip-canoe.html
    Max
    Last edited by Alaskacanoe; 09-10-2006 at 22:55. Reason: adding website link

  12. #32
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    Default In progress

    I am leaving this weekend for a caribou hunt but will try and post a few pictures when I get back. I am about 1/4 through with my 20 foot so you will be able to see the progress.

  13. #33
    Member alaska bush man's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Gruman Frighter

    I use a 19' Gruman Frighter with a lift and 9.9 mercury with a Rock hopper Guard for the prop.
    Alaska

  14. #34
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    Default Canoe

    that canoe is the back bone for canoe travel in Alaska ,I was saden when Grummen stoped making them, but then when the new CO. started making them I knew that we would be getting new people into useing them they are the best that I have found, the 9.9 you have should do the job just find putting you up most rivers in Alaska SID
    PS did you get the lift oft of Fairbanks ?

  15. #35
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Ally pack canoe !

    I got one of these 3 years ago for a canoe trip on one of the Noataks lower tributaries. I was absolutely amazed. Its made of Tarpulon. A lighter version of Hypalon that the Zodiac rafts are made of. I drug the heavily loaded canoe over rocks in the shallows, bounced it off boulders and canyon walls, and ran over gravel bars for 7 days. Amazing boat. This past August I took it on the Kugururok (another lower Noatak trib) on a 13 day trip. Incredible canoe for backcountry trips. I am taking it on a 70 mile flyfishing trip in Togiak this coming August for 11 days. My buddy who joined me on the last two trips, bought one himself for this past trip. We got the 16.5 foot models. They weigh less than 50 lbs and fit in a large backpack, can be checked as airline luggage, and carry 830 lbs. I know this is true because my wife and I weigh 520 lbs and took 360 lbs of gear on the 13 day trip. We went through some light class III water with no problems. Not by choice, it had rained for two days on us and the water was up. The 15 foot model weighs like 35 lbs and would be great for 2 people and perfect for 1 hauling meat. The 16.5 is my choice for canoe camping/fishing trips. The 18 ft model hold 900 lbs. They are made in Norway by Bergans and imported to U.S. via Cascade Crags in Washington state. I saw where Equinox Adventures in Anchorage has some for sale as well. I will attach a link to their page that gives lots of details on the canoe for anyone interested. If you fly out in the bush or want a canoe you can throw in the trunk of your car, this is the only way to go in my opinion. I will be buying another one soon as some friends are going to join me on the next trip and this give me the perfect excuse to buy one.
    http://www.equinoxexpeditions.com/boats.html

  16. #36
    Member WinMag_300's Avatar
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    Default I am a Sportspal fan.

    I own a 13 foot square stern Sportspal and I love it. Very stable and easy to steer. When fishing, I can stand up in it without fear of capsizing. Excellent hunting and fishing canoe.
    A man is rich in proportion to the number of things he can afford to let alone. - Henry David Thoreau

  17. #37
    Moderator Alaskacanoe's Avatar
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    Default Ally canoe

    Now this looks like a great boat, and you have tested it on some great expeditions. The fact that you can pack it up and ship it on the airplane makes it really attractive.
    Sounds like the material is tough and it looks like it should paddle and respond well, as it looks to have a conventional canoe shape.
    For Alaska,, this may be one of the best ideas going, the take down canoes have advantages...

    When you come to a fork in the trail, take it!

    Rentals for Canoes, Kayaks, Rafts, boats serving the Kenai canoe trail system and the Kenai river for over 15 years. www.alaskacanoetrips.com

  18. #38
    Member WinMag_300's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Alaska Series Inflatable Boats View Post
    ...I have a quiver of 9 canoes. In the quiver are 5 Clippers, 1 Sawyer, 1 Ally Collapsible and 2 Alaska Series Inflatable Canoes. . .
    Jim,
    I have never used an inflatable canoe, but it seems like a good idea for portability. However, I don't know anything about the durability of inflatables. Generally, canoes take a lot of beating on the rivers and trout streams I navigate. What kind of durability can I expect and how much maintenance will I generally need to do on an inflatable?
    Thanks.
    A man is rich in proportion to the number of things he can afford to let alone. - Henry David Thoreau

  19. #39

    Default Inflatable canoe durability

    Quote Originally Posted by WinMag_300 View Post
    Jim,
    I have never used an inflatable canoe, but it seems like a good idea for portability. However, I don't know anything about the durability of inflatables. Generally, canoes take a lot of beating on the rivers and trout streams I navigate. What kind of durability can I expect and how much maintenance will I generally need to do on an inflatable?
    Thanks.


    WinMag


    Back in High school, I remember an experiment we did with balloons in Mr. Clutter’s physics class. We took an ordinary balloon and blew it up softly with very little air pressure. We then took a needle and tried to puncture the balloons. We discovered that we could not puncture the balloons with the needles because it took more pressure to push the needle through the rubber then there was air pressure pushing from the inside of the balloon against the point of the needle. The low air pressure was absorbing the pressure of the point of the needle. Then we increased the air pressure inside the balloon little by little until we were able to pop the balloon with the needle. At that time Mr. Clutter was teaching us why they make auto tires out of rubber and air and how they absorb impact on the road.

    I use the same Grizzly Hide® fabric in my Alaska Series Inflatable canoe as I use in all the Alaska Series Inflatable boats. The durability of the Grizzly Hide® fabric has proven to be very rugged. Just ask any one that owns one of my boats.

    In general what makes inflatable boats so tough is the combination of the puncture strength of the fabric and the same physics principal as I leaned with the lightly inflated balloon.
    Most inflatable boats inflate between 3 to 4 PSI of air pressure in the tubes. This low air pressure allows the fabric to absorb most impacts and often doesn’t even show a scuff. The weave of the polyester 1100 denier Decitex base cloth is very tight. It’s similar to the weave of a Cordora pack cloth but with less stretch. This gives the fabric puncture strength many times greater then the air pressure inside the tubes. So the boat tends to either absorb or bounce off most things they hit or rub against.

    If you ever do puncture the fabric it is easy to repair in the field with the use of urethane tapes such as Tear-aid. http://www.tear-aid.com/ These Urethane tape products have made field repairs so much easier then the old glue and patches methods and they will last about 5-6 years. Urethane tape is pretty much peal and stick after you clean the affected area with an alcohol pad repairs don’t get much easier. .

    Of course I also cover all repairs as part of the 5-year warrantee. So once you get your boat back to town bring it to me and I can do factory style repair that will last the life of the boat.

    Over all you should get 15-30 years of useful life from your Alaska Series Inflatable boat depending on how you take care of it. .

    If you need more specific information on the Alaska Series Canoes please ask.

    Good boating
    Jim King

    Alaska Series Inflatable Boats, Commercial quality at Wholesale prices River Rafts, Cataraft, Inflatable Kayaks, Inflatable Canoes, Inflatable Sport Boats, Inflatable Jet Boats, Tenders and Dinghies. WWW.alaskaseries.com
    (907) 248-2900

  20. #40
    Member WinMag_300's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Thanks, Jim

    for the detailed explanation. I'll be in touch when I need one of those boats.
    A man is rich in proportion to the number of things he can afford to let alone. - Henry David Thoreau

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