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Thread: Bow hunting moose in anchorage city limits

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    Default Bow hunting moose in anchorage city limits

    Wasnt there/is there a program going on for a few lucky people being allowed to harvest a moose during winter in anchorage, details?

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Fish, I think you're thinking of the blackpowder/muzzleloader season for cow moose up in Powerline Pass/Upper Campbell Creek. They started this hunt in November two years ago with 3 tags. They want to increase the harvest in order to lower Anchorage's huge moose population, but they're starting small so as to get the public used to the idea. I asked Rick Sinnott (the Anchorage ADF&G biologist) if they were considering ever adding archery to the mix, and he said that they likely never will because of some bad incidents in the past. I believe it was in the 80s that there were some similar bowhunts where a few moose ended up running around with arrows sticking out of their legs. The public uproar ended the hunts, and F&G doesn't want this hunt to meet a similar fate.

    Incidentally, there are a lot of permits given out every year for archery moose hunts on Ft. Rich and Elmendorf, as well as a few in the Birchwood area.

    Thinking of taking up archery?

  3. #3

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    Darn... I was looking forward to shooting one out of my bedroom window haha joking... but I think it would be nice to have the upper hillside given a little more hunting rights

  4. #4

    Default i agree

    I agree that a bow hunt should be added to the Anchorage area. To base bow hunting now on incidents in the 80's is silly. The equipment has become so much better and accurate. If you make it a bow certified area, than the people out there shooting at the moose have proven to be able to hit a target. well i said what i needed to.

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    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    If you wanna pack a moose out 5 miles uphill register for the arctic valley permit... Theres some bruisers back there
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bryan19alaska View Post
    If you make it a bow certified area, than the people out there shooting at the moose have proven to be able to hit a target.
    I would agree only if they made the proficiency test more difficult. Personally, I consider it a travesty that you are considered "certified" if you can hit 5 of 8 targets within 30 yards. Under such a loose requirement, we're just asking for a repeat of the circumstances mentioned above. Sending semi-proficient bowhunters up onto the hillside that have shown they can hit a target 62.5% of the time is a recipe for a public black eye for bowhunting.

  7. #7

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    They can always do what Elmendorf and Ft Rich does and make them do a proficiency shoot prior to the hunt.

  8. #8

    Default Just my thoughts

    Having just lived in anchorage the past 3 years and having taught the bow ed for the state numerous times at Rabbit Creek--that class was specifically started because of the "incidinents" that occurred in the past, to educate the future so as to keep it from happening again. In the army some of the procdures that we go thru are painful, but as one leader mentored me, we today go thru the pain for yesteryears mistakes--fair or not.

    Erik I agree, the test isn't the toughest--but then that is in our eyes--I used to think that a person should have to hit 8 out of 8 kills, but then I was reminded that Alaska is one of the only states that makes people go out and shoot at animal targets--though I got to hunt camp lejune one year and you had to go thru a profieciency shoot to hunt on post. The bottom line is what does the rest of the public think, just because equipment is "better" doesn't mean that the shooting is better, it just means that the mistakes get to the animals quicker. I think it will be quite a while before bowhunting is brought back to the anchorage area. And of course when it does it will be a drawing only permit.

    GL to all

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    Being so close to town and having the scrutiny of the media and nay-sayers ready to jump at an opportunity to say, "I told ya so", then they should have a harder proficiency test. This is a hunt that is very do-able, they just need to do it in baby steps because of that black eye from the past. Maybe offer it drawing permit style with say, 15 tags. Only certified bowhunters can apply. With the proficiency test, I think that you should only get one chance if drawn and you must score 10 for 10- 100%. If a person fails the test, the permit is not issued and someone else who also applied but didn't get it will get an opportunity. Kind of like the next person in line. Maybe F&G could select 45 people total and have 30 of them as backups in case the others choked while testing. Knowing this requirement going into the hunt, it would weed out quite a few folks that way or at least make them practice harder so they can pass the test. My .02...

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    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    they should start in the eagle river valley
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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    Default Bowhunters made the rules

    The bow hunting community came forward and worked with the state to develop guidelines for special hunts and the criteria for certification. Most of it was done pro-actively, not due to misuse, poor ethics, etc.
    As a MBIT I feel there is little correlation between proficiency and ethics. The two issues are tied together, but independent. Yes, ethical people will tend to practice more all the time, but people that just want the certification may only practice enough to get it.
    Does a tougher standard for the practical test mean that hunters will make better decisions? Reasonably no. I am an advocate for more stringent standards for certification, don't get me wrong. But we can not, and will not ever change the morals and ethics of bow hunters based on the thesis that proficiency drives ethics.
    Have people thought about alternatives? What about permanent marking, or registering arrows? What about requiring a "mentor" volunteer, or volunteer "guide", similar to hunting on private land in Europe? What about a law that states an animal struck is an animal taken, and therefore the tag is filled regardless if it was a wounding shot or not? What has worked elsewhere? What experiences have other states, or countries for that matter had?
    I would like the ANC area opened up to hunters simply to add opportunities to hunt. This forum has the ability to develop a unified voice to take good suggestions and proposals to the B of G advisory committees and the Board of Game. By communicating pro-actively and defining a course of action, there is the chance to push through the changes necessary to develop a special methods hunt in that area. And if done correctly a model can be set for other areas as well.

  12. #12
    Member SusitnaAk's Avatar
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    Default anch

    Ak river rat, Well said,,,

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