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Thread: Bearcat 570?

  1. #1

    Default Bearcat 570?

    The only experience I have with snow machines is watching them pass me on KGB road. I want one. I want to use it for better hunting opportunities, or just cross country touring. No kidney jarring, 100 mph runs required.

    I have a Polaris 6x6, and think Polaris when it comes to snow machines. I called them, and they immediately recommended the Arctic Cat Bearcat, more specifically the 570 for what I want to do. I talked to another Arctic Cat dealer, and he said it was about the most popular snow machine, or something along that line. I started to peruse this forum, and am coming to the conclusion that might not be the case. I want to buy a new one, and the '08 Bearcat 570 seems pretty reasonable compared to some others in the Touring class. More important to me than any particular brand, is getting a machine that is best suited for hunting, touring, and maybe cruising around Hatcher Pass, etc.

    Any input would be appreciated. Thanks.

  2. #2
    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    As an AC guy, I would highly recommend the Bearcat line for what you're looking at. It is a solid work sled.

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    Member mod elan's Avatar
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    I'm partial to widetracks so I go with the Skandic line. If not a fan of widetracks than the bearcat is a good choice. When it first came out in 95 it had a 440 under the hood then it disappeared and now it has the 570 which is much better in my opinion. The 440 used to get heat soaked and bog. I like the high/low tranny in the Skandic, but you have to get a widetrack to have that. For some reason the pickings are slim in the super long, narrow track sleds. I know the new Tundra LT came out this year with the same size track with a 1.5" paddle and 550 fan motor. I don't know what the Bearcats cost, but these two seem to be the only choices nowadays in long, narrow track machines.

  4. #4

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    Thanks for the replys. How much difference does a 20" vs 16 " track make? I think both the Skandic and the Bearcat 570 have a 156" long track. I am 6'4" and weigh 250. I have sat on a Bearcat, and it seemed to have reasonable leg room, will seek out a Skandic and try one today. A new Bearcat 570 is around $6600. That seems pretty reasonable from what I have been seeing on the web. I want to get it right the first time, though. Thanks again.

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    Member byrd_hntr's Avatar
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    Default one thing to consider...

    When I was comparing the two the main thing I noticed was the rider forward design of the new doos are much more forgiving on the body. I didn't ride the scandic LT (It wasn't out yet) but I rode the bearcat 570 and scandic 800 and for a begining rider the scandic was much more easy to shift my weight and make the sled behave for me. However the bearcat seems to ride smooth and had lots of power.

  6. #6
    Member mod elan's Avatar
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    How much difference does 5 foot snow shoes verse size 12 boots make? ANY extra track on the ground is worth it in the deep stuff.

    Purchasing a first machine is always very difficult. More often than not it turns out to not be the right machine for what the person "thought" they wanted to do with it. Be patient and ask a lot of questions. The new Skandics are very expensive compared to the Tudra LT and Bearcat. Don't even look at the regular Skandic WT. For a couple hundred bucks you go to the Skandic SUV and have a much better suspension. You and I are the same exact size and I ride an Expedition TUV. It's huge and I carry a winch under the seat for when I'm alone, but it takes me everywhere from Thompson Pass, Summit Lake, Eureka, and more. The Tundra LT or Bearcat would be an average persons all-round machine to do some work and play with.

    If you're torn between two machines, figure out which dealer you feel will treat you right and go with them. A dealer that will stand behind their product and not forget you after the sale will make any bad experience with the machine a little easier. No brand is problem free. It's how the problem is handled that matters in the long run.

  7. #7

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    Thanks again for the replies. I'm leaning toward the Skandic SUV or the Tundra LT. Mod elan, when you say average person, do you mean size, or use. One consideration I hear is that a 16" track will maneuver between trees better than a 20". Also they are easier to get unstuck. Is there something to those arguments? I guess it would be a factor when hunting. All the dealers seem friendly so far, as they have yet to get my money. Thanks again for the help.

  8. #8
    Member mod elan's Avatar
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    By average I mean the average user. Myself and some other widetrack owners I know and ride with do things with our machines they were not meant to do. I've gotten some strange looks and people shaking their heads when they see the places I've been in Thompson Pass. Specially when I do it pulling a sled! The nice thing about being big, it is easier to throw a heavy widetrack around. Any machine is heavy when it's stuck. How much less does a person with a widetrack get stuck than a narrow track? Nobody has a number, but I have an idea. I have an axe, small hand saw, tow rope, and small backpack shovel under the seat. The trick with a wt is not to dig a hole. When I feel I'm about to lose forward momentum and spin out I stop, back up, go forward, back up farther, and hit it again. If I do spin, I dig out the sides a little and around back so that I can do the back and forth thing to pack down a "take off pad". With any snowmachine there will be a learning curve to figure out what the machine wants and how it reacts to your input. Sometimes it's a couple rides and sometimes it's a thousand miles to [U]really[U] get the feel of the machine. On hard pack trail that winds thru tight trees only the width of the machine a wt may want to push more than a 16 wide. I think that length is more of the issue in the tight stuff. I don't have any problems in the trees, but I also know how to manipulate the machine very well. Have you looked at any used SUV's? Feel free to pm me. Where are you at?

  9. #9
    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    The difference between 16" and 20" is 20% surface area in ground contact. This is not always a good thing. A wide track makes the machine harder to turn, both on trails and in the powder where you need to be able to kick the machine over. The wider footprint makes both more difficult, especially weaving through the woods where you need to make snap decisions on which direction to turn as the terrain changes.

    A wide track will give you more "flotation", but this is also not necessarily better. What keeps you moving forward is the weight of the snow that the track is pushing backwards. This is why longer tracks work better than wider tracks off the trail. And this is why the deeper the paddles the better it will work in deep, powdery snow, as you are picking up a larger mass of snow and with the really long tracks available, you are pushing that snow further in linear distance, which directly translates to forward movement of the sled.

    Yes, a wide track is harder to get out of a hole. That 20% increase in surface area translates to 20% more snow packed in the interior of the track and rear suspension when you get stuck. In the old days of 16x136 as the biggest track, you could easily be picking up a hundred pounds of heavy wet snow. The current trend of giant tracks has easily doubled that weight.

    A wider track's only real advantage is when you are carrying a heavier load on the machine, which is offset by the added flotation. A big disadvantage is that you have left the realm of readily available replacement 16" tracks and are pretty much stuck with what the manufacturer put on the sled.

    The BC570 is a 16x156 with 1" lugs. The lugs are minimal, but this machine isn't designed for deep powder use. The shorter lugs mean the track will last longer and will perform very well on trails, hard pack, and wet snow conditions. An advantage of the BC model line is the use of a wide ratio clutching system. Due to this, it is like you have a low geared tranny that also retains the top end speeds. It is fully automatic and requires no user input other than your right thumb on the throttle.

    For your described use, I wouldn't be too quick to start looking at wide tracks or to dismiss the BC line. I also wouldn't limit your investigation to the "work horse" lines, as you will find many other sleds that will fit your function very well. And while you're looking at the new sleds on the showroom floor, don't dismiss the possibility of a used sled. There are plenty of nut cases that just have to buy a new sled every year or two and place the old one in the classifieds. If it's your first sled, you might be better off skipping the $3000 depreciation as you drive off the dealer's lot and buy a sled where someone else has already covered that cost. Then, if it doesn't meet your needs, you can sell it (at much lower loss over a new sled) and upgrade next season, but you'll have a better idea of what will suit your riding needs by that time.

  10. #10
    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JOAT View Post
    ...disadvantage is that you have left the realm of readily available replacement 16" tracks and are pretty much stuck with what the manufacturer put on the sled...
    Please excuse my mistype here (it's late). The standard track is 15" wide, not 16, and the BC 570 also falls into this atypical "wide track" category (though a 15" track will fit as long as the drive lugs line up, it will just lack 1/2" on each side over the original). The short answer is, for what you're looking at, you don't need to worry about track replacement anyhow. It's just a downside of the wide tracks that you don't have aftermarket options to choose from. But then most BC users don't fall into the typical aftermarket manufacturer's market window.

  11. #11

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    Thanks for the input JOAT. I have just spent some time sitting on the Skidoo SUV, and Tundra LT. I am about hooked on that Tundra LT. As a matter of fact, I really liked the fit, and the height of the handle bar. It is a much easier position to stand up from. I didn't think I would like it, and wasn't thrilled with it at first, but after spending some time on it, sitting on the SUV didn't seem right. The lugs are 1.5", and the track 154x16, I believe. They have a heavier duty hitch in the accessory catalogue, which bolts to the frame. It seems like it should work for hunting, and trail riding. Unfortunately, it is new this year, so getting an opinion of it isn't happening.

  12. #12

    Smile skandic swt 550

    this is the machine for a big man (like me too), these machines will put you anywhere you want to go and you dont have to fight it, it just goes.

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    I have the 2007 Bear Cat. I do like it but after riding the new Tundra 550 LT i would definatly buy the Skiidoo. I don't know how the new Cat handles but i think the Skidoo would be tought to beat. It turns sharp, great in 4' of powder, good up hills breaking trail, sounds nice and very light. Wish I could trade my Cat. Oh well...might have to get me the Tundra LT 550 and give the Cat to my 7 year old.

    I have a Polaris 6x6, and think Polaris when it comes to snow machines. I called them, and they immediately recommended the Arctic Cat Bearcat, more specifically the 570 for what I want to do. I talked to another Arctic Cat dealer, and he said it was about the most popular snow machine, or something along that line. I started to peruse this forum, and am coming to the conclusion that might not be the case. I want to buy a new one, and the '08 Bearcat 570 seems pretty reasonable compared to some others in the Touring class. More important to me than any particular brand, is getting a machine that is best suited for hunting, touring, and maybe cruising around Hatcher Pass, etc.

    Any input would be appreciated. Thanks.[/quote]

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    Member patrickL's Avatar
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    This thread has alot of great info. I am in the same situation as sasquatch. I moved up here this past spring and am looking to get a snow machine just to get out and hunt, fish and maybe get into a remote cabin. They sure to provide a great opportunity to get out and explore some great country.

    Anyway thanks for all the info. Particularly for a smaller guy the non-wide track machines sure seem like the way to go. When your stuck there's nothing worse than a big machine. No matter what you bring with you, there is not substitute for being able to muscle a machine out of the hole your in. If anyone is ever looking for a partner to join them I would totally be up for it. I have done a bunch of snow machining for my job out west but nothing for pleasure.

  15. #15

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    If you want to sell that bearcat let me know!!!

  16. #16
    Member byrd_hntr's Avatar
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    Default Im going to change my mind here.

    After seeing the new doo lineup for this year, the Bearcat 570 XT looks like a good all around sled to me. Ive been using my old Tundra R for firewood this winter and its worked pretty well, but I'm thinking about upgrading to a bigger sled to that i don't have to drag a toboggan with me every time I go anywhere. The XT has everything the doo's don't (lol). My number one gripe with the Scandic line over there is the fact that they don't have a modular seat. For my needs being able to add to my cargo area when needed and throw a second seat on when I want to take someone along is really valuable. Second the articulating track that can be lock out when you are pulling is a good idea. It adds weight and extra parts to wear out and break but what a great addition. One thing I have to say... the darn thing is heavy. When I get my tundra stuck I get off pick up one end and move it till im unstuck. When I tried to pick the back end of the XT off the show room floor I think I felt my spine shoot out my *****!

    Im on the verge of pulling the trigger on one of these sleds. A few questions I have for those to drive them:

    What kind of mileage are you getting? Anyone have on in the interior or where its cold, how do they handle the extreme cold? Fluffy powder? Right now in Fairbanks we have about 3.5 feet of light fluffy powder, how does it float. I would think that its good due to the fact that the 20"x156" track really has a big surface area. Has anyone mounted a gun boot on it? How about the warm days, does it cool itself off well? Fans are typically pretty good. And finally hows the power. Keep in mind Im moving up from a ity bity Tundra so this thing is going to be like strapping into a Sherman Tank to me.

    Quote Originally Posted by byrd_hntr View Post
    When I was comparing the two the main thing I noticed was the rider forward design of the new doos are much more forgiving on the body. I didn't ride the scandic LT (It wasn't out yet) but I rode the bearcat 570 and scandic 800 and for a begining rider the scandic was much more easy to shift my weight and make the sled behave for me. However the bearcat seems to ride smooth and had lots of power.

  17. #17
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    I rode the 570 XT in Cantwell in December. It has a great ride and tows well. And as mentioned it is a weight mother...holy cow. I didn't get stuck and played in some good powder (about 4 feet) but play turns to work quickly with it after horsing it around. I did over 100 miles on the tank and had a bit left. Main complaint was that at -25 the battery didn't have the oomph to start it and pulling it through the first few times was a real bear. If I had pulled it through first then maybe the battery could have done it...but who knows.

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    Default 570xt

    We got the wife a 09 570XT this winter. Yes it is heavy but so is my 660 bearcat wide track. That is one reason we also have a Warn snow winch! She has not had a chance to ride it a whole lot but does have a little over 130 miles on it. For what we do she likes it. We are not sure on fuel mileage yet but it seems to be about 12-14 depending on what the snow conditions are like. We are going to make the Eureka-Lake Louise run today so will be able to give you more information. As far as starting in cold temps, when we had the -20 in Dec it started everytime I tried.
    We like the570XT but then all of our ATV's, snow machines are Cat products.
    Good luck.

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    Member byrd_hntr's Avatar
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    Question AC tyical problems?

    Can anyone comment on Arctic Cat typical problems? I don't want to start a brand bashing expose please. For example on my Tundra you have to keep an close eye on the oil injection system as they seem to wiggle loose. Just something to keep an eye on.

  20. #20
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    Default 570xt

    We made the run from Eureka to Lake Lousie on Saturday. A little cool but it was a good day to be out. The wifes 570XT worked as it should. We did a round trip of 82 miles and the 570 got 12.2 MPG. My 660 cat got 20.5 on the same trip. Yes it was all trail riding and the trail was in good condition. So far the only 'issue' we have had with the 570 was it not idling, going down a hill. It was a new machine and still needed to have its first service. Once the service was completed it runs good.
    Good riding!

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