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Thread: Wall Tent Stove

  1. #1

    Default Wall Tent Stove

    I have a 12x14 wall tent and looking to get a stove that is big enough to keep warm, but not sure what size... Anyone with experience in stoves wanna share their insight... Looking at 2 different sizes right now 24L x14w OR 28L x 16W. Will I be up in the middle of the night to stoke fire? Is there a brand or style that anyone would recommend? Thanks for your thoughts.

  2. #2
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    Default stoves

    I have a 9x7 wall tent with a pretty small stove, not sure on the dimensions but it'll roast me right out of the tent at times with wood. If you burn the fake logs then it'll burn colder but last longer. You'll probably have to put logs in either stove in the middle of the night.
    One other note is if you do burn duralogs or any other brand fake logs you will have to clean the chimney more often.
    I'm sure you know already but put sand or gravel in the bottom first.
    That's about all I remember in dealing with tent stoves.
    William

  3. #3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rooster_AK
    I have a 12x14 wall tent and looking to get a stove that is big enough to keep warm, but not sure what size... Anyone with experience in stoves wanna share their insight... Looking at 2 different sizes right now 24L x14w OR 28L x 16W. Will I be up in the middle of the night to stoke fire? Is there a brand or style that anyone would recommend? Thanks for your thoughts.

    Generally yes, you will be up to stoke the fire if you want to keep it going all night. Most people just let it go out and light it again the next morning. Put a bunch of kindling and fire starter next to it so you can hop out of bed...throw it all in, light a match and hop back in bed. Then get up when it's warm, doesn't take long.

    I used to sleep in mine in the winter in the Brooks Range. They work good.

    I don't think it makes a whole lot of difference between those two sizes of stoves. If you have it going hot enought to turn it red hot, it will warm the tent.

  4. #4
    Member martentrapper's Avatar
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    Default

    You have to decide what you want in a stove. Lightweight sheepherder type stoves are good for travelling. Heavier stoves are generally tighter, hold a fire longer, but suck for moving around. The usual type wall tent stoves won't hold a fire that long, so like Marty said, have kindling ready. The larger the stove, the more wood you can stuff in it, so the longer it will hold a fire..........assuming you can shut down the air flow thru ther stove. These stoves also aren't made of very thick material, so will warp over time.
    The 12x14 is fairly large. It won't hold heat very long. You may end up getting up during the night to stoke the fire just to keep a little heat in the air.
    I'm sure either of the 2 you listed will keep the tent warm as long as they have some fire burning in them.
    I can't help being a lazy, dumb, weekend warrior.......I have a JOB!
    I have less friends now!!

  5. #5
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    Default

    You are right on that, Martentrapper.

    He will also have to decide the season he plans to use the tent. For example, i use my 8'x10' canvas tent the first two weeks of September when hunting moose in the interior of Alaska. Sometimes it gets colder than usual, but not much colder that perhaps 20 degrees. I heat my tent from 1 to 3 hours in the evening before I get in my sleeping bag, and sometimes when the weather is too bad for me to hunt moose, such as when raining hard, when the fog is too thick, etc., and I have to stay in the campsite.

    All I have used in the past has been a Coleman propane heater to heat my tent, but now have switched to a Mr. Heater (the one that uses 1 propane bottle). The heater is safer to use indoors, and has an oxygen sensor. One can also use a hose to run the heater from a small propane tank, but I keep the tank outside. This heater produces from 4,000 BTU-8,000. The same company makes another similar heater, but much larger and heavy, and up to 18,000 BTU-HR.

  6. #6
    Member Adventures's Avatar
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    Default I own the big buddy heater

    We have an arctic oven that we camp in when we are spearing during the winte and the Mr buddy heater keeps it more than comfortable all night. First trip we tried an actual stove, but the hot and cold variances were just rediculous. One second you would have all of your clothes off and it's 500 degrees (usually during start up) next thing you know it's freezing and you stoke the fire and start it all over again. Very hard to find a happy medium. The duralogs might work better though. And we do have a damper on our stove.
    Mr. buddy is alot lighter and has three settings and a fan which I don't usually use. Also has it's own ignitor. The only thing i don't like about it is it seems fragile. while it has made numerous trips in the sled out to our favorite pike hole with no problems I just dread the time it doesn't work when we get there.
    Justin

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    Member bushrat's Avatar
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    Default Four Dog Stoves

    If weight isn't a factor, check out the steel stove made by Four Dog:
    http://www.fourdog.com/page2.html

    Really a good stove, and will hold a fire all night. If you want cheap, and fairly light, buy a barrel stove kit and use a 30-gallon barrel, and that will hold a fire all night too if you stoke it right. For cooking, though, and a real quality baffled stove, hard to beat the Four Dog.

    Good Luck,
    Mark

  8. #8

    Default Thanks all

    Thanks for the info. folks... I appreciate it and will actually see about the 4 dog stove, looks like that will work great for me.
    ...Good Hunting.

  9. #9
    Member FALCON's Avatar
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    Default Stove

    I have a Cylinder brand stove in my wall tent. The tent is 14x17. I have the outfitter model with the water heater on the side. I normally fill it tight full of wood at night, and stoke it once in the early morning. Good quality and heavy duty.

  10. #10
    Member alaska bush man's Avatar
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    Default Military Yukon Stove

    I have one for sale!
    Alaska

  11. #11
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    Default Canvas Versus Synthetic

    I have read that canvas is better for breath-ability, but the synthetics are lighter. Does anyone have a preference for one or the other?

    http://www.squidoo.com/CanvasWallTents

  12. #12
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Default

    If you're packing you tent on your back, the best options are the Kiufuru or Ti-goat synthetic tipi style tents that are setup for stoves. 4-dogs and Ti-goat both make titanium stoves that weigh but a few pounds, though cost a few $'s.

    The least expensive option for 1-2 people lightweight setup is a black diamond megamid tent, with a stove jack added from ti-goat, and a small ti stove. About $500 and the whole setup is ~7 pounds.

  13. #13

    Default

    Depending upon your uses, you might consider a portable kerosene heater. I use a 23,000 btu heater in my 12x14 canvas wall tent and like it a lot. I've been comfortable in mid-teen to low 20's temperatures, and in the more typical low-40's temps when I hunt, I can keep the heater turned on medium-low.

    Advantages: Plenty of warmth, and is a less humid heat than propane; doesn't go out at night; no firewood issues; temperature setting easily adjustable; don't need a stove pipe.

    Disadvantages: Bulky and heavy; have to bring your fuel with you - can't gather fuel in the field.

  14. #14
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Default

    Be real careful about carbon monoxide poisoining with the kerosene seater. If the exhaust from the heater isn't ducted out of a flue you have a serious risk of co poisoning.

  15. #15

    Default stove

    We used the M-1950 with diesel and it was a great little stove, lightweight, compact, and you can burn wood if you don't want to burn diesel, or just don't pack in enough diesel.

    Also, a few posts behind this one, there is a guy "alaska bush man" that was listed as "Banned", can anyone shed light on this? I was interested in the stove he had for sale.


  16. #16

    Default Thanks Bushrat!

    Mark,

    Thanks for the link to 4dogstoves. I am seriously thinking about the titanium stove for my arctic oven tent. That looks like the real deal! Really like the light weight of it.

  17. #17
    Member polaristracker's Avatar
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    Default Stove

    Like Wasilla guy I have a Military Yukon stove....he is partially right in that you can burn diesel or wood. But you can burn any type of gasoline/petrol/benzene in this stove. That means MOGAS(gas mixed with oil), regular gasoline, and diesel. I bought a used snow machine and sifoned the gas from it and burned it in my stove. I also took the remaining speed dip I had left from trapping season and burned that as well. YOu can also burn charcol or coal as well
    -If you buy it for an arctic oven make sure the tent is properly modified for your stove. I believe the Yukon stove pipe is around 3.5 diameter...reg is 3..not sure but can measure for certain if you are interested. Also I had a gromelet sewn into the bottom portion of the tent with a velcro cover, to cover the hole when not being used...kind of like the stove pipe hole. Don't remember the gromelet size (just enough to fit the rubber gas hose through) but I can find out, or if you buy it in Fairbanks ask them...they will probably remember because it was kind of an unusual request.
    -My personal opinion, if you own a arctic oven tent (with the exception maybe an 8X8) then you are not buying or using a light weight pack tent...and if you think you are you will be highly mistaken. So you are going to be on the heavy weight size regardless, having a thin metal stove such as sheet metal etc packs light but makes for a very fragile stove....they are not thick and will not sustain gasoline, or coal. So why not go with a metal stove...yah it will be a little heavier..but shouldn't matter..but it will be sturdior and your options to burn different materials brodens...just my two cents...good luck
    I have advised others of this and they are all happy the went with a sturdior/metal stove.
    OH yeah and you can cook right ON TOP of metal stoves, some cooking spray and almost like a grill-without the holes..at least mine I do....nothing like fresh cooked game meat on the stove...yum

  18. #18

    Default Any fuel stove

    Polaristracker, we did actually burn straight gas in the stove at home in the yard simply as a test. Burned perfectly, my only problem with this type of fuel is the volatility of the fuel burn pot and what might happen in a tent if something tipped over, got bumped, etc. Just like the feeling of burning diesel a whole heck of a lot better than burning gasoline.

    One thing we noticed about this stove though that we didn't like much is that a majority of the heat goes down to the ground not up above the stove. We were in a heavy rain during our hunt last year and every night were drying our clothes by laying them on the ground under and near the stove. Dried about twice to three times faster than the clothes we had hanging above. Still the stove produced good heat and was a great asset to the wall tent.

  19. #19
    Member polaristracker's Avatar
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    Default Thanks

    Wasilla guy for sharing your experience. I honestly I don't have a lot of experience burning diesel in these stoves. Although when I was in the military we used Jet fuel JP8 once (all we could find)...you talk about volatile
    We were heating up just off of fumes
    Anyways most of my fuel, just by experience, has been mogas or regular. I will have to try diesel next time.
    -FYI for all those looking into this option. Make sure you have a working fire extinguisher in your stove kit. I do not start or use the fuel without it I have had other stuff catch and was able to extinguish it very quickly. With tents if you do not extinguish it quickly it will burn down so fast you will lose it all...have personally seen this. Remember this isn't a house made out of wood, it is synthetic material mostly nylon, once it ignites and if you haven't put the fire out...say goodbye.
    -Also with this type of stove I highly recommend the floor saver or canvas type material on the bottom, as well a metal drip pan-directly under the stove (I use one from a car parts store) on the floor. Canvas will give you a little more fire resistance than the nylonn. And most of the time these fires start from the floor from gasoline/diesel leaking/dripping on the floor.
    Anyways good luck on your decison

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