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Thread: Meat Damage on Grouse...

  1. #1
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    Default Meat Damage on Grouse...

    We've been talking about this for a little while but here are the 3 birds I just shot with my 12 gauge.Far less meat damage than using your .22
    I had a bunch of birds given to me that someone had shot with a .22 and vowed I'd never use that as half of them where toast.Either way it all depends on your shooting.
    But my preference is the 12 gauge.Daniel


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    I shoot my grouse in the head ,so not alot of meat damage. But I use to use a shotgun,seen them in decent shape and blown to bits.

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    Member lab man's Avatar
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    It doesn't exactly take an expert marksman to shoot a grouse in the head or neck with a .22. If your main concern is meat damage, then the .22 is by far the way to go. If you can't shoot worth crap, then yeah, go for a 12 gauge with 7 1/2 or 8 shot.

    Your post gives off a tone that badmouths using a .22. Don't make assumptions based on a bunch of birds your friends shot and gave away. The only reason I don't use a .22 is because I enjoy the challenge of shooting birds on the fly with my 20 gauge. For someone who has taken a vow never to use a .22, it doesn't sound like you have much experience in that field.

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    I've never shot or eaten a bird killed with a shotgun. Do the pellets usually pass through or are you chewing on them all the time? (honest question)

    I've always used a .22 in the head.

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    Member lab man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FarmerGrant View Post
    I've never shot or eaten a bird killed with a shotgun. Do the pellets usually pass through or are you chewing on them all the time? (honest question)

    I've always used a .22 in the head.
    I haven't bitten a pellet yet. I often see a pellet or 2 when cleaning the birds, but most seem to pass through, don't hit the meat, or fall out before being chewed on.

    -Eric

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    Member PatrickH's Avatar
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    Default .22 solids

    I hate biting shotgun pellets. I use a .22 with solid points and aim for the head or neck. If I do have to shoot the body, the solids do not tear up the meat bad. Hollow points will make a mess of them though. Good shot placement with a .22 leaves no meat loss and hones your marksmanship at the same time. The only time I would consider a shotgun is if they are on the fly. About the only thing I use the shotgun for anymore is winter ptarmigan on the wing.

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    Yeah but ...Grouse will sit still sometimes, and not move until you are right next to them. Only a shot gun will help you then, and a wide-open choke. That's for THOSE shots. For when you see a grouse ahead of time, not for example right when it flushes or sneaks behind something until you flush it out, a 22 solid leaves a neat hole that wastes nothing. I think the answer to what's best goes beyond what damages the most meat and really should be, "What is your most common shooting opportunity?". I think the most common opportunity is a grouse sitting and acting dumb ..a 22 LR shot. Unless you are doing it for sport, I think that flushing shots are only about 1/4 of the available shots ...22LR solids are best overall. So much for that. The one gun that covers the widest variety of situations is still the shotgun ...and in that case, I'd vote for a 20 gauge (wide open, e.g. Improved Cylinder, choke). What do *I* carry?? A 22LR, that's what. I'm tempted on the 20 gauge but too cheap to buy one just now, and my 12 gauge seems overkill for these (delicate) birds. Just my 2-bits. I don't mind different opinions, spout away! It's all good and on the dinner table! Yessirreeeee...

    Brian

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    Member alaskaal's Avatar
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    Default How about a 410?

    I'm wondering about a 410 barrel on a Super 14. Having no experience with a 410, but the owner of a Super 14 frame, what do you all think? I have used a .22 in the past and it does OK, but the 410 has me intrigued.

    Al

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    .177 air rifle 800 fps and doesn't get the neighbors in a tizzy when I pop one in the back yard. Cheap as heck to shoot, bb's work good but a pellet to the head is better.

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    Default Guage size

    The " guage " size is a moot point it's the load your shooting that counts whether it's a 28, 20, or 12. I've found the 7/8 oz. with 8 shot and a cylinder bore optimal for birds out to 25 yds with no meat damage, you can get this load in all three guages...........It just depends on how much wieght you want to carry. I hunt over a pointer so I always shoot on the wing so this is what works for me. The question whether a 22 or shotgun is better is also a moot point, they both will kill grouse cleanly it's just a preference of one hunting style over another.

  11. #11

    Default 22

    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel in Ak View Post
    We've been talking about this for a little while but here are the 3 birds I just shot with my 12 gauge...
    22 to the head creates less damage

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    Quote Originally Posted by beng View Post
    22 to the head creates less damage
    Unless you have eyes like mine ...got some Williams Fire Sights, front AND back, on the way for my Marlin 60. The standard front sight is hard to see and the rear sight is nothing but a blurrrrr ...with or without glasses. And although the Fire Sights blur too, they've GOT to be better than the sights that I have now (if not, then it's scope time.) I'll use the 12ga for now. I'm hoping my new sights will get here before I head out for bunnies...

    bd

  13. #13

    Default I switched to a scope

    Quote Originally Posted by tananaBrian View Post
    Unless you have eyes like mine ...got some Williams Fire Sights, front AND back, on the way for my Marlin 60. The standard front sight is hard to see and the rear sight is nothing but a blurrrrr ...with or without glasses. And although the Fire Sights blur too, they've GOT to be better than the sights that I have now (if not, then it's scope time.) I'll use the 12ga for now. I'm hoping my new sights will get here before I head out for bunnies...

    bd
    I switched to scope this season and it has been really good. I went to Sportmans and picked one up for 30 bucks, sighted it in, and have been having some fun evenings. Just gorgeous lately. I did have to resight the scope after missing a bird I knew I was aiming squarely at.

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    Quote Originally Posted by beng View Post
    I switched to scope this season and it has been really good. I went to Sportmans and picked one up for 30 bucks, sighted it in, and have been having some fun evenings. Just gorgeous lately. I did have to resight the scope after missing a bird I knew I was aiming squarely at.
    SW has a Nikon 2.5-7x32 blackpowder scope (50 yd objective) that looks pretty sweet, and not bad at $136. I won't buy cheap scopes anymore ...since the $ I put into the ones that got tossed for various problems add up to more than one better quality one. I've got some Williams Fire Sights coming for the .22 so I can see the sights better, but if that doesn't work ...it'll be the Nikon

    Brian

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    Member SoggyMountain's Avatar
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    Those birds look like they've taken on more damage than most I shoot with a .22. Sometimes my slingshot does some real carnage. Even so, the meat always tastes good to me.

    Perhaps the ones gifted you weren't cleaned well?

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    Member Doug in Alaska's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alaskaal View Post
    I'm wondering about a 410 barrel on a Super 14. Having no experience with a 410, but the owner of a Super 14 frame, what do you all think? I have used a .22 in the past and it does OK, but the 410 has me intrigued.

    Al
    I have a Remington 870 in .410 and it goes with me during moose season and when I hunt grouse after moose season closes. This is my second year with it. Two weeks ago my wife and I took 17 birds with it. Damage is minimal, however, I go for head shots when up close and if the birds are out further, I try to shoot them from the rear. I like this gun so much I sent it out to have it refinished with Black-T at season end last year. No worries about rust when hunting in the pouring rain.
    Someday someone may kill you with your own gun, but they should have to beat you to death with it because it is empty.

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    Talking Shotgun

    This past weekend went out and took 10 birds. Out of the 10 birds only one had any meat damage. The other nine birds did not have a single pellet in the meat. The one bird that did, I knew when I shot it that I would have meat damage. Shotgun is the way to go for me.

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    Default 12 gu. a might big

    A 12 guage is definitely overkill for spruce chickens. Even with small shot. Better to use .410, 28, or 20 guage with #7. With the 20 you'll have the same success as the 12, but with way less damage. A scoped .22 for head shots is also fun, and guarantees no meat damage.

    Anybody still shoot a 16?

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    Talking Remm. 1100 16 gauge semiauto...........

    with a mod. barrel is what I use for all of my shotgunning. It was my fathers when he used to phesant hunt in southern MN. Works like a charm when I am on my shooting game, which is every so often. I have had practically no meat damage shooting 7 lead shot at Ptarmigan in Hatchers pass and 2 steel shot on ducks this year on the hay flats. Getting harder and harder to find ammo for the 16 gauge though......I usually buy in bulk when I find it......

    I just put a scope on my marlin 22 LR and am anxious to try the head shooting on some grouse or ptarmies sometime soon.....Deer on Kodiak first, though.....

    Cheers!

    Jake

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    Quote Originally Posted by AKanders View Post
    with a mod. barrel is what I use for all of my shotgunning. It was my fathers when he used to phesant hunt in southern MN. Works like a charm when I am on my shooting game, which is every so often. I have had practically no meat damage shooting 7 lead shot at Ptarmigan in Hatchers pass and 2 steel shot on ducks this year on the hay flats. Getting harder and harder to find ammo for the 16 gauge though......I usually buy in bulk when I find it......

    I just put a scope on my marlin 22 LR and am anxious to try the head shooting on some grouse or ptarmies sometime soon.....Deer on Kodiak first, though.....

    Cheers!

    Jake
    For a long long time, I didn't see 16ga ammo anywhere. I was surprised to see a pile of it over at Sportsmans though (Fairbanks). They had a pretty good selection too, but it cost 40% more than 12 or 16 gauge stuff.

    Brian

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