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Thread: Takedown recurve

  1. #1
    Member AKRoadkill's Avatar
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    Default Takedown recurve

    I was just given a takedown recurve with no markings except draw weight (65#@28") on the limbs. Anyone know of a website with photos I can use to figure out who made this thing and to see if I can get a set of lighter limbs for it?

  2. #2

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    Can you post a picture of it, maybe one of us can let you know from seeing it.

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    Default Photos

    Here are a couple photos. Scott at Fletcher's couldn't tell, other than it ain't a Martin or Bear.

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    Default Ooops...

    I don't know how I jacked up the picture posting...can someone fix it?

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    well there is one photo, but it's hard to tell by that one.

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    There are 3 photos, but they got posted side by side instead of vertically...that's what I meant by jacked up. You can scroll to the right and see 'em all.

  7. #7

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    well duh on me LOL.

    THat really looks like a bob lee nock off. Like someone like my trying to build a bow and use the bob lee signature TD as my riser profile.

    I bet you that it isnt a commercially made bow. Try talking to Mike Stevens, he c ould know. It looks pretty well built and I dont think it's a first timers bow, though it could have been. Also look up Martin Farris, or Ed Hill. I don't know the guys down that way but I'm almost certain it's one of theirs.

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    It came to me from West Virginia; not sure if that means anything. Looks to me like a factory job, or made by someone who knew what they were doing, but then i don't know that much about bow-building.

    Who's Mike Stevens, Martin Farris and Ed Hill? Pardon my ig'nance, but I ain't familiar with those names.

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    Go to the Brackenbury custom bow web page looks similar to there custom bows.

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    It does look similar to Brackenbury, but the limb bolts are flush, and all the bracken burys seem to have the bolt heads sticking out.

  11. #11

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    that is not a brack!!! You would immediatly see the difference in quality of workmenship right off the bat. The risers are not close to similar if you look at the profiles.

    Ed and Martin are in Traditional archers of Alaska.

    You can find Mike Stevens at Northern Air Cargo headquarters.

    I can't help you if you didnt buy it here. It could be anyones bows. There are a LOT out there that look SIMILAR to it. My bob lee riser looks extremely similar profile wise though it's definatly not the same (hence my nock off comment).

    I'm sure the person who built it knew what they were doing. It does look nice, good lines and all, and some nice wood work in the riser. But to me, and this is personal, it just looks plain. Notice the upper limb, lines dont match up from limb to riser. Things look blocky in transitions. Not something a commercial bowyer would do and stay in buisness for long doing these days. Back in the old days it was different, what people saw or visioned in a bow was different. You don't need to look far today.

    It's just my speculation that this is a home made bow. Or it could be a bowyers very early bow? The tip detail is very nicely done. The riser and riser to limbs just dont look right. It looks better then I could do by far, but still looks like it was done by a amatuer bow builder with good wood working skills. All that said, it's extremely hard to tell the quality of the bowyer just buy looking at a photo as all stickbows look good....well most do. There's a fine line between outstanding workmensship and a home made bow.

    You might try posting this over on tradgang.com as there is a ton more stickbow folks there (everyone lol). SOmeone might know this bowyer, or this bow, and may have even owned it at one time. It's amazing how much these bows get passed around.

    Oh you might also try Brian Stewart at Straight flight arrow company.

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    Member AKRoadkill's Avatar
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    Yeah, I don't think it's anywhere near a top-of-the line bow...was kinda just hoping to find ho made it and maybe order some 40-45 lb limbs so my wife can shoot it too.

    Whatever it is, it's pretty fun to shoot, but noticeably heavier (both in heft and draw weight) than my 55 lb Martin X-200. Might be the one I take my first recurve big game with.

  13. #13

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    you can get limbs for that bow. Go talk to Mike. He might be able to hook you up. Or any of the other guys.

    For making a td recurve you are using one form for both limbs, they can copy those limbs and should be able to come up with something that'll work just fine.

    Most take down recurves are a bit heavier. Not only do they have the limb mounting system, that riser looks bigger and beefier then the x200, hard to tell withou them side by side though. Also type of wood and density of wood is going to add weight. Weight in the riser is a nice thing to a certain degree. That is until you get used to shooting a longbow.

    If I can help ya getter set up let me know. Stickbows are addicting, and teaching someone to get addicted is even more addicting. Besides good hunting partners are hard to come by!!!

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    The guy who sent it to me says he was told it's an Assenheimer. Thought he was joking, but I looked it up and there's a fella in Ohio named Donald Assenheimer who makes (or made) takedown recurves. Looks similar, so I imagine that's what it is. Only issue is, a set of limbs is over $300, so I think it'll remain a 65 pounder and we'll get the missus a whole new bow one of these days/months/years. She ain't a hunter, but would like to shoot a little.

  15. #15

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    make form off of those limbs!!!

    It'll cost you a bit to get started, but you can build whatever you want!

    I havent seen an assenheimer but it could be.

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    I might look into new limbs after I get back from Iraq. Or I'll keep it as is and get another, lighter bow. I been shooting this one over the past few days and really like it, although I ain't too good with it yet.

    I shoot strictly instinctive; don't want to use sights or "gap-shoot".

  17. #17

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    there's nothing wrong with shooting it any way shape or form, if it makes you a better bowhunter.

    What you'll be amazed to learn is that many of our great shots started with some form of aiming, which over time slowly converts into instinctive. If you can take the time to try it. Shoot split vision, gap, point of aim, and do it daily, you'll notice over time that you rely less on the mechanics of sighting, and just shoot.

    There's nothing wrong with instinctive either. It does have a steep learning curve in a slow manner. The problem I've found with it in my short time of being a stickbow hunter, is the first year it came fast, as it should, you can only get better. Over time you hit a plateau and getting from being a respectable shot to a good shot , or a great shot is where most stop, not because they can't shoot better. But becuase the mechanics they choose to use don't quite allow it. I shot stincter for many years, and over time went to a somewhat aiming style. I cannot quite split vision, or gap but I do it. When I'm really humming I can split vision and I know it. I see it, shoot it and can and do pile arrows. The odd thing is even when i can't see the picture, I can still shoot pretty decent on most days. I just feel that shooting stincter style has a natural barricade to limit you from taking your shooting up to that next level, and your hand eye coordination development is the dependant factor on just how far you get as a instinctive shooter. So the style is a good style by all means. But for me, to jump tot hat next level, I have to take the time to shoot in the other manners, yet I find myself on those really on days, not noticing anything but where the arrow is going to strike. Take it for what it's worth and best of luck either way ya go.

    I'm sure when you get back you'll be ready for a new bow anyways. That part is just as addicting as it is a joy to shoot them. Did I mention I was ordering two more .

  18. #18

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    forgot to mention.

    I looked at assenheimers bows. Boy that's a tough call, but I still dont think so. Look at the top of the sight window below the limb, there is design missing.

    Look at the distance between the top limb and the curvature of the front edge from the shelf to the top limb, his is more pronounced S looking and the site window itself is shorter.

    This could be an early bow...heck the guy's been building for 30 years. Maybe somewhere in the 80's? And it could have been refinished, that's the reason for no other markings other then weight.

    That also could have been a bingham kit someone did. Built the limb forms, and you get all the materials needed to build it in a nutshell anyways. You still have to build the hot box, and your riser blank. The only real bow building part is the limbs and tillering in a bow like this imho.

    The hard part is the differences between one bowyer to the next is general so sutle, a point is moved here, a section is dished out there etc etc etc, that saying it's any one bowyer is purely a guess, and speculation. The bowyer may recognize it, or someone with a bow very similar might see the subtle nuances that claim it's heritage to one person's hands. I cant see it being a assenheimer, or any custom made bowyers bows of any recency. It belongs to someone and good luck finding it, I hope you do, I'd like to know myself. She looks nice, and I'm sure shoots nice, but I havent seen the bowyers mark yet on this bow to any bows mentioned or bows that I can think off the top of my head. I'll keep digging though. I've emailed this to some buddies in the midwest and out east to see what they think it is. NO response yet, time will tell......

    Be safe in the sandbox!

  19. #19
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    I was thinkin if it is Assenheimer's, it's probably an earlier one; the lamination in the riser is more plain than the ones on his website, and the veneer on the limbs also. I didn't notice the items you mentioned, but I really don't know what to look for. Maybe I'll email a couple photos to Don Assenheimer himself and see if he can tell me...?

  20. #20

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    That's what I would do. ANd if you have posted pics on tradgang yet, I would! There are bowyers there from all walks, some professional, some home guys, and just a bunch of stickbow addicts. Someone is bound to recognize this bow.

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