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Thread: How to break a Glock.....

  1. #1
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    Default How to break a Glock.....

    Water_Gremlin,

    I dont know!

    I think your thread about the 1911 and the Glock was a good one but it did get of the point a bit. There was alot of intest in it and interestng input, however.

    I have owned six different Glocks and have shot at least 100 more, for various reasons. I've owned a lot more 1911s, about 25 or so. The 1911 seems to feed very well out of the box when they are rack grade (loose fitting) and hardball is used but when using soft point/hollow point in a gun that is a little tighter they often have feeding problems, most get better after a 500-1000 round break in. It order for them to be extremely accurate, which they can be they must be hand fitted and tuned to feed everything, which they can be, they are very expensive. My first choice would always be a 1911. It will be hand fitted and tuned to feed every thing and put all shots into 3" at fifty yards, I have some just like that. The cheapest one cost $1500. Beautiful, reliable, rugged, dependable with a good source of pats to make them fully field repairable.

    The Glock is cheap, ugly, reliable, rugged, dependable with a good source of parts and accessories but not generally field repairable.

    Glock is the least likely auto-loading handgun to fail to feed. I have shot all of the available, and no longer available, pistols from the P08 Luger to the XD Springfield. There may be a couple of the Johnie-come-lately pistols I've missed, but you get the idea. Glock works better than all of them. The will feed any ammo, I've run about 100 thousand rounds of handloads through a few of them.

    I've never experienced the malfunctions described in your original thread, I'm sure there have been some. There are a huge number of Glocks out there and many of them are in incapable hands.

    One thing I've noticed about the Glock, it is not susceptable to the limp wrist failures of most of the other pistols. When we limp wrist a gun, that absorbs the recoil energy of the slide and usually prevents the gun from cycling, I've never even seen that with a Glock. I've loaned Glocks to students who could not cycle a M92, or even a SiG and they could shoot a Glock. Of course that's a piss poor excuse to buy a Glock, one should learn to shoot correctly, but the point is, the gun works in less than ideal shooter performance.

    The low manufacturing cost is why the police departments bought them in the first place. The reason they are still in use is because the do work.

    I really like the Sigs, but the Glock is a more relaible feeder. The CZ is a very good rugged design, but like the 1911, it requires a bit of fit and polish to be top notch. I have a Sphinx (Swiss made CZ clone) that is the best "CZ" ever, but here again quite pricey. (And no longer made.)

    There is the Kahr T-9, one heck of a nicely made highly reliable pistol, I think it is still made if you want a nine. I just sold one which had 2400 rounds in through it since new and never failed to feed any thing. Truely the only rival for feeding for any Glock. I just didn't own the Kahr long enough to shoot it much. I would prefer the T-9 to any Glock or anything else, if I needed a nine.

    The Glocks are striker fired. They are grab-and-shoot, one handed, either hand, pistols. The Kahr, the Sigma, and a couple others are in this category. (No manual safety lever, no visable hammer, no external "gear shift" required to shoot.) The 1911 is an entirely different animal and it defies logic to consider only the Glock or the 1911. It makes me think you need more education in the different types of auto-loader lockwork.

    Which striker fired pistol is the best?

    Which double action pistol is the best?

    Which single action pistol is the best?

    Which dual action, hybrid-lockwork pistol is the best?

    What DAO system is best?

    What is the differences and advantages/disadvantages of each of the different types of auto-loading pistols?

    For all who care to comment feel free to answer these questions.

    Bonus: What is the difference between the P-35 and the CZ-75?

    Bonus#2: Where is the safety on a Kahr T-9?
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



  2. #2
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    Default Glock question

    I do a lot of handloading with my own cast bullets. At one time I was considering a Glock and the clerk at XXXXX Gun Shop, San Antonio, Tx told me that because the barrels of the Glock were not cut riffling they would lead very easily with cast bullets and the Glock was not recommended with cast bullets. Doesn't sound reasonable but possible.

  3. #3
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    Default No lead thru Glocks

    They are right, you never want to shoot lead through a Glock. Instead of groves that are "cut", the rifling in the Glock barrel is more like a rounded "hill". When the bullet enters this type of rifling, it has a tendency to slip a little bit before the rifling forces it into a spin. If you use lead bullets, they will leave a large amount of lead fouling at the first little bit of rifling. This will increase the chamber pressure on the next shot, and more so on the next, etc. While you may get away with this for a 9mm or even .45, you will not get away with it in the .40s as they are operating so close to the pressure limit and you are running through a 9mm sized barrel that has a bigger hole (read: less barrel wall thickness).

    A friend of mine actually blew up a .40 Glock 22 using his handloads. It was his fault as he likes to load near the red line. The barrel split open lengthwise along the top and destroyed the slide in the process. Fortunately he was not injured. I've heard other stories of the .40 Glocks failing with bad reloads.

    I have run a lot of reloads through my Glock .40, but I always load near the bottom of the power chart (I'm using it for target shooting, don't need much to get through cardboard). However, I only run jacketed bullets through the Glock barrel. I do have an aftermarket barrel with cut rifling that I bought to run lead, but I found that lead bullets in .40 didn't save me anything at all, so I haven't been using lead in that caliber for several years now.

  4. #4

    Default Glocks, 1911's, and other auto pistols

    I have owned a few Glocks, 2 in a 10mm, one in a 40 S&W and one in a 45, I did not like any of them. i played and tinkered with them and never liked the way they shot. I guess I was spoiled with the 1911's that I have had. They always shot well and a joy to carry. One other auto loading pistol that I have owned and still have is a 40 S&W in a Smith model 410. I have shot 4000+ rounds through it and never had a problem. I have had it for 7 years and taught several people to shoot a hand gun with it. I bought a Sig P229 in a 40 and enjoy that one as well, no problems with feeding or ejecting. There is just something about Glocks that just isnít right, they are like Murphy said ugly, they remind me of and AK-47 ugly as he** but will shot every time. The 1911 is a fine gun and has the look, feel and tradition behind it. I will take a 1911 any day of the week.

    Whit

  5. #5
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    Default

    Murphy,

    Which striker fired pistol is the best? *Best for what? 1911 is the best sidearm one could hope to own, mind you there are inferior 1911ís. However, they are not for the novice or those on a budget. Budgeting novice's require the use of the Glock!*

    Which double action pistol is the best? *See above*

    Which single action pistol is the best? *1911*

    Which dual action, hybrid-lockwork pistol is the best? *See first answer*

    What DAO system is best? *Hammerless Revolver ok for backup*

    What is the differences and advantages/disadvantages of each of the different types of auto-loading pistols? *Doesnít matter if your looking for the best, see first answer*

    For all who care to comment feel free to answer these questions.

    Bonus: What is the difference between the P-35 and the CZ-75? *A few bucks.*

    Bonus#2: Where is the safety on a Kahr T-9? *The same as on all weapons. Between the operators ears. *

  6. #6
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    Default

    [quote=JOAT;147688]They are right, you never want to shoot lead through a Glock. HUH?

    If you use lead bullets, they will leave a large amount of lead fouling at the first little bit of rifling. Not even maybe

    This will increase the chamber pressure on the next shot, and more so on the next, etc. While you may get away with this for a 9mm or even .45, you will not get away with it in the .40s I have over 40K through mine and to absolutely no detriment, at all. Never even seen leading in the bore.

    A friend of mine actually blew up a .40 Glock 22 using his handloads. It was his fault as he likes to load near the red line. The barrel split open lengthwise along the top and destroyed the slide in the process. Fortunately he was not injured. I've heard other stories of the .40 Glocks failing with bad reloads. Best friend (cop) did that with loads he made on my press, but because he is an idiot and didn't listen. His ONLY loading experience.....Gun probably saved his life as the same as above happened and the grip tried it's hardest to split but the plastic withheld the explosion and blew the mag out the bottom of the frame breaking two twos on his right foot.


    Ok guys not to beat a dead horse, but I have heard this so many times over the years and it has no backing. Glock said this is due to the strange rifling they use but numerous sales reps and Glock trainers that I have worked with in LE say the opposite, including at the armorers school I have gone to 3 times.

    I am ex law enforcement and have carried two Glock 40's for the last 15 years. I have also worked in a local gun shop here for 12 years off and on and sold thousands of these guns and NEVER seen a single one that was blown up by "Lead bullet use"

    My 22 has well over 40K rounds through it and has never hiccuped even once with my loads. ALL of which are 180 gr Bear Creek Lead with 6.8 gr of AA#5 (A tack driving high end of the velocity chart load)

    I switched to 357 sig a few years ago and use the KKM precision drop in barrels. I had to send the 22 back to GLock to get the new frame and have put almost 10K in sig through it (these are all jacketed due to velocity). I've never blown up a gun or even had a single squib or bad round that wouldn't fire, but I tend to be VERY cautious when I load.

    The Glock is an excellent carry/duty gun as they are absolutely indestructible, but are they a great gun? Nah, I agree with the comments about 1911's as great toys. There are millions of guns for the millions of different shooters and all of them have their weak points and high points. Why do I carry/use Glocks for self defense? High capacity of an excellent defense round and the **** thing never fails no matter how badly I have treated it. My other toys are for play, Glock for abuse and duty.

    Thoughts?

  7. #7
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    Default

    I,m a old revover guy but I must say that with some learning time on Glocks (mostly trigger) I,m sold on them. Great guns that work with not many problems.There is a reason they are so popular!!

  8. #8
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    Exclamation Bad Advice!

    Quote Originally Posted by Yellowf4 View Post
    ...Ok guys not to beat a dead horse, but I have heard this so many times over the years and it has no backing...
    You tread on dangerous ground by advising folks to ignore the manufacturer and supporting data about lead bullets through a Glock. There in fact are many well documented cases of failures caused by barrel lead fouling. Controlled tests have shown a steadily increasing chamber pressure with each subsequent lead round fired. The amount and severity is dependent on caliber, lead bullet (type & lead hardness), velocity, etc. Perhaps you can shoot 40K rounds without a problem, but that doesn't mean someone else will have the same good luck. I would highly recommend Glock shooters to follow the manufacturer's recommendations and not shoot raw lead. Besides, you can get copper plated lead for only pennies more and avoid a potentially dangerous condition. It ain't worth the risk.

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