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Thread: Cabin dream

  1. #1
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    Default Cabin dream

    I'm going to build a cabin in a remote area. This coming winter I will be freighting my building materials, tools, etc... out to my land so I can begin building next spring/summer. Any info on snow machine and tow sled models that will best suit my needs is appreciated. My trail is overland, mostly flat. I would like to haul 1000 pound loads. I have looked at Siglin sleds on-line but have not seen one in person.

  2. #2
    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
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    Default

    Check out this thread by Alaska_Lanche. Good info for what you are looking for. Hope this helps.

  3. #3

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    The "OTTER" line of sleds work well for heavy loads. I have no complaints with mine at all.

  4. #4
    Member akgiauque's Avatar
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    Default Ron

    I would look at a superwide, they can haul a ton or more, litterally. A for a sled, Talk wih Ron at the Deshka Landing, 354-7001, He makes a sled that can haul as much as you can tow. They are more than a tubb sled but much stronger. A friend and I each built a cabin this spring and we pre hauled the lumber. On one trip, we hauled 5600 pounds between two Ski Doo Superwides last winter, the trip is about 60 miles and we had no sled trouble (eitehr of them).

  5. #5

    Default My experience

    A year ago I was in the same situation as Krotokid. Everyone that I asked told me that I needed to buy a Skandic and get a custom freight sled built to haul the material to my property, which is 20 or 25 miles from the Deshka Landing. Even though I didn't have any experience hauling freight with snowmachines, I just couldn't see spending more money on the equipment to haul freight out there than what the entire cabin would cost. So I bought an old ('95, I think) but reliable V-Max 600 from a buddy for $900 and I rented a homebuilt freight sled for $25/weekend. The freight sled was a simple design that utilized UHMW skies, square steel tube frame and a hog panel for a deck -- probably less than $400 to build. Needless to say, I hauled freight all winter long and this setup literally never missed a beat. I just took it slow and easy each trip and my little putt-putt machine just kept chuggin' along. Some of my loads surpassed 2,000 pounds, and we never had a single break down.

    Just to clarify, I didn't post this to try and convince anybody that a '95 V-Max is a better freighting machine than a Skandic, because we all know that it isn't. The point I would like to make is that it is not always necessary to spend $10K or more on a freight sled and machine when a much less expensive solution is often available.

  6. #6
    New member AKDSLDOG's Avatar
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    Here's my freighting set up. Polaris LX widetrack and a 4'x8' homebuilt freight sled. works well for hauling out other sled's.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by AKDSLDOG; 10-01-2007 at 12:58. Reason: forgot pic

  7. #7
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    Default Culvert sled

    I made mine with culvert. It comes about 25" wide and you can overlap it if you want a wider sled. You can have it bent for the front and back, frame the sides with dimensional lumber and weld a hitch. They're tough and pull well.

    BLT

  8. #8
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    Default

    Seems like you have a fun project ahead of you. Good luck out there on the trails Krotokid.

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    Default Uhmw

    Build your own sled. It is easy, no kidding. If you are going to build a cabin you can certainly build a sled with the same tools. My friend and I started building them 25 odd years ago. Won't say we built before Siglin, but that is the same era.
    All you need is a sheet of 1/4" UHMW (ultra high molecular weight) polyethelene plastic. Ideally you want UV resistant. The white is never UV resistant, and the black is normally recycled or lower grade. They come up to 5' wide and 10' long. You also need a piece of 1/2" x 24" x 36" for the tongue. You will need a handful of 5/16" bolts (prefer stainless), washers, nylocs, a couple of heavy "U" bolts with nuts to match, and some rope.
    Tools needed are a circular saw, drill, wrenches, C clamps (quick clamps and vise grips work really well). You will also need something for a skeg. I use 2 pieces of 1" angle cut to about 16". If you want to get fancy I have ripped the material for custom width sleds in a table saw and I use a Dremel to smooth the edges.
    Take the material to a welding or machine shop that has a Break long enough for your material. UHMW can be cold bent without harm. Each side will have 3 bends, each bent to 45 degrees. It must be overbent to end up being straight as it relaxes. Or use a heat gun and clamps/weights to bend the corners. CAREFUL, the stuff will melt, and it holds heat for a long time!
    Take it home and make 3 or 4 cuts on each side near the corners so you can bend up the ends. Drill them, bolt them, and wallah you have a tub. I cut one end of the tongue into an apex or point. I use the scraps for the hitch and make a sandwich to pinch the flat tab on the machine or drill a larger hole for the pintle. 2 u bolts make a great hinge.
    There is nothing to break on this sled. It rides soft and quiet, pulls easy, and depending on terrain and power, you just can't overload it. Even though you use UV resistant, try to keep it out of the sun in the off season. If you want to save money and use non-uv rated, and can keep it out of the sun, expect 6 to 10 years use out of the sled at the best. I've built a bunch of these for friends mostly. Sure never made a dime. Can't quite figure out why. Guess I just work too cheap.
    And last, the stuff floats. The sled won't be watertight, but it goes over water really well. Just don't go slow.

  10. #10

    Default post a picture

    post a picture please

  11. #11
    Member AKGUPPY's Avatar
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    Default

    X2 Thanks

  12. #12
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    Default here is a link

    This was posted before, but will do so again. www.northernsledworks.com

    Some pretty good pictures. If you need more info, pm me and I will tell you what I can. Building a sled is easy. Keep in mind that I like a narrower sled for pulling behind me when I break trail. If your trails are wide and packed, you can go much wider.
    Sorry I don't have a camera now to be able to post pictures, or I would include photos of my sled. Which needs some TLC after years of abuse. I also build my hitches and hinges a bit different too.
    I suggest you all find some buddies that want to build sleds and buy a bunch of UHMW and get it cheaper. Maybe there is a way to CO-OP on the forum here too.

  13. #13
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    Default Siglin Sleds

    I have used and built Siglin Sleds for approximately 25 years and highly recommend them for hauling all your building material. If you decide not to build one I can also recommend David, at Northern Sled Works. He is good to deal with and charges a fair price for his sleds. If you do decide to build one, he will sell you some of the parts and pieces, like complete tongue assemblies, etc. He won't sell any sheets of the red plastic however, as that is his "signature sled color". I purchase a lot of the parts and pieces (including the sheets of plastic) from Cold Spot Feeds, in Fairbanks.

  14. #14
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Sounds crazy but

    I was ice fishing on Lake L. last winter. I hear a snowmachine a commin and towing something for sure. Yep, here he comes towing a small utility trailer full of supplies. Humm,..... he took some skis, wide enough for the tires to sit in, and had straps that went from each side of the ski, through the rim fastening to the other side. There may have been other connections.

    What he did was to tow the load up to the lake with his vehicle. Then jack it up and attach the skis. It worked really well.

    NOTE: He was on a highly packed trail.

    Vietnam - June 70 - Feb. 72
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  15. #15
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    Default

    I moved my cabin supplies into a frozen lake cross country. I used the 14' Jon boat that is now on the lake. Just have a tow bar or the like welded or bolted to the front...or anything solid to stop the boat...and away you go.

  16. #16

    Default

    You could make ski's out of uhmw real easy to do what Dave is talking about. Just 2 mini uhmw sleds.

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