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Thread: I'm looking for an electric mini flesher? any ideas...i've see the air powered flesh

  1. #1

    Default I'm looking for an electric mini flesher? any ideas...i've see the air powered flesh

    ok, i've seen air powered mini fleshers but by the time i pay plus 200 bucks on the mini flesher, then have an air compressor shipped out here to the bush, i
    ll be up well over 500 bucks...so, i might as well get a table model!....

    so, surely there has to be an electric mini flesher somewhere?....i can't find it though!....heck, a dang drimmel with a fleshing blade and some type of adjustable guard would do the trick on a fox!....not sure about a bear....beaver, surely.....
    any ideas?...

    scotty
    Scotty in the AK bush

  2. #2
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    Default hmmm

    I don't want to sound like a jerk, but break out the beam and a two handled fleshing knife. If you don't have one, use soapy water and a big spoon on fox, that works also. Don't go electric, get in there and get dirty Its half the fun.

  3. #3

    Default I do enjoy the hand work, but, i teach, coach, trap and run a culture program...

    so, my time is limited and I am starting to get the villagers to drop off their kills intstead of leaving it lay on the tundra, so, in a week, i might get 5 dropped off foxes, plus, what i shoot and trap...plus beaver...so, with coaching, teaching, running the line, etc, i need to be able to whip out work if need be...

    BUT, i agree with what your saying about hands on...after teaching all day, i need to produce something with my hands and trapping does that for me....i like doing the lips, ears, eyes, paws, etc adn take pride in it now...but when i started, heck, i never read a book...i just saw something on one line about 'splitting lips", etc...so i figured it out myself...adn actually hated detail work til i got it...cheez, guess i should invest in a good taxidermy book!...might make my labor more worth while...which brings me to my next point, heck, i never knew to sharpen the two handle flesher!..i jsut used it as it and said, 'this sucks'..and went back to a knife...

    But, i have learned to use an native made ulu knife now, and it works pretty good.....

    so, I really need advice on shop setup....i use the fleshing board, put a nail in top to hold the skin, but, really, i need to see how someone else does it....and i don't hav e a shop, but, use an extra room....so, that sucks..

    anyway, no harm in your comment, i totally understand nad agree, and it reduces stress for me too!...

    by the way, i did find a couple of electric fleshers for like $500, not really saving anything over the air powered ones since you'll spend $250 for the toola dn $250 for a good compressor shipped to the bush...but, it woudl be quieter...

    all advice welcomed..

    scotty
    Scotty in the AK bush

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    Default electric

    I don't think the electric fleshers are meant to speed up the process. A guy I know had one in one of the villages I worked. He used it because he tanned all his own fox and used the electric flesher for the face work. If your selling your fox, you don't need to do much to the face, get really good from the ears down. I can flesh a fox in about 10 minutes. I don't think it is going to be any faster with electric. Could be, but the guy I know who had one, was ALOT slower than I was.

  5. #5

    Default 10 minutes!!! Ok, well, tell me what you do...i am having problems then..

    ok, maybe i like to tiddle to much...relieving the stress from school, maybe!

    i am having problems with the thin membrane that covers the skin...i have some fox that have alot of fat, i cut that off and then there is that thin membrane that if you don't get off, there is the oily deposit that does not dry...sometimes, that thin membrane will dry up and peel off, but the skin still has some drying to do...

    sometimes, crap, it is hard to get off....i have used the flesher knife, but, have ripped stuff up..

    i think my problem is that i have not seen a guys shop in service working a fleshing board....the guys i saw skinned beaver perfectly th efirst tiem with a knife...and the fox, i guess they just skinned, dried and peeled.....but, i have seen some problems later on with that method...

    so, would you mind giving me a run down of what you do...

    i skin, flesh, wash then stretch/dry...then peel usually....and take an ulu and run it up and down the dried flesh....for fox....

    do you use wood or metal stretchers?....

    thanks for the help...i'm fixing to spend a couple hundred bucks on scapels, either wood or metal stretchers, etc...

    scotty
    Scotty in the AK bush

  6. #6
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    Default

    Scotty, I think you are barking up the wrong tree with the electric flesher. If you have a beam and 2 handled knife and they aren't working well then either

    1. The beam isn't shaped properly
    2. The knife in not any good
    3. You are not doing it properly

    The whole trapping community has been looking for a better fleshing system for 100 years and unfortunately the knife and beam is still the best. As Fisherman said, the powered fleshers are for fine taxidermy work. Good luck if you get one and I hope it works for you, let us know.

  7. #7

    Default hmmm, i might want to watch a video, etc...

    my beam is shaped 1/2 moon?....it is thick on one side with an edge thickness or beam thickness of 1.75 in?...then it slopes off to teh right to a beveled thinner angle?....

    i think that I need it free standing , i have let it lean against a work table adn it always seems to get in the way of the two handles...i did see a fleshing beam with a 'leg' that was attached to it so it stood up indepenedently of a table...

    well, how sharp does your blade have t be on the two handle flesher?...

    thanks fo rthe help...i could spend the money on more beams, knifes, etc....

    well, thanks fo rthe help....all tips are welcomed!

    scotty
    Scotty in the AK bush

  8. #8
    Member moosehead08's Avatar
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    Default Forget the electric flesher!

    Hi Scotty I have used the electric flesher the air flesher and the good old beam. I think every time I will grab for the beam and the two handled flesher. I have fleshed literally hundreds of animals and I will tell you that you just need to see some one use any one of these tools and you will find that it is kind of an art. There are many factors that make it up the angle, the blades edge, the beam, and the aging of the fur you are skinning. I would suggest to buy a high quality knife though. I use two different knives sometimes three depends if I am fleshing beaver type hides or real thin canine hides. I use the two handled knife from Sheffiled Knife for beaver all the way up to fleshing moose. Then I use a Necker knife or one that I actually made for canines. I must tell you it just takes a lot of practice either way. I think beaver is the best to practice on since they aren't worth much any more and there hide is more forgiving. Another real good inexpensive way is the ulu I could never use one they just didn't work for me but, I have seen a few guys really good with them. The key to doing these bigger animals is to have a super sharp knife and only work a very small portion of the beam at a time don't plan to use the whole thing at one thwack. I wear an apron and hold the hide in place with my belly being pushed into the hide and beam then work the hide down from there. I then kinda peel off the fat at a motion that is really hard to explain. The motion starts from the top right, by your belly then goes down and from the right to the left. If it goes nice and smooth it will be a good clean cut through the fleshing. If you feel a resistance you are starting to dig to deep in to the hide. You must be very cognizant of feeling that resistance or you will cut an amass of holes. Another key point not really discussed yet is the beam. I like mine really flat compared to some I have seen with really round appearances. I made mine out of a 2" by 10" and then just tapered it moderatly and then shaved the sides down to round it out a bit.
    Well there are my two cents on the matter if I can be of any help to you or i could try to go into more detail just let me know. Best of luck!--Nick

  9. #9

    Default Alright, alright, ya'll convinced me!!! I'll spend the $300 plus on flesher/beams...

    Ok, I pulled out a fur video i have and paid attention...i had not watched it for a while....it is awesome, detailed!...when i watched it, i jsut took in the basics since i did not know what they were talking about in doing ears, lips, setup, etc, sinced i had not done a fur yet!..

    so, i recommend "alaska guide to fur handling" with Percy Duyck and Joe Mattie...it is over 2 and 1/2 hours long!....and they get detailed shots into ears, lips, techniques, etc ....i sat up til 4am and watched it again and realized how many simple mistakes i had made...like not using a flesher in teh correct manner, he says his is not sharp...and my fleshing beam, crap, i was running it backwards!...he stands up, beam headed down, nailed to the floor, adn he pushes away....to the tail....i was pulling to the tail down the board...I got this through Ak dept of fish and game, free since i teach!!!

    So, I'm looking at renting an old house with heat from the city here so i can use it as a shop.....that should solve my problems...

    and i have a question...on the video, he had like a narrow blade on his flesher maybe only 3/8? in wide, but, it was like 5 inches tall...is this a speciality flesher that you have heard of?...it worked good on everythign he did...

    Front view
    12 in long wise
    _____________________________________________
    |
    5in |
    |
    |___________________________________________

    all the specific names and widths on this stuff that you can recommend, I would appreciate it...i know everyone uses different stuff, like the ulu, etc...but, hey, i got some money to play with now if i am not gonna buy a flesher and air compressor!...

    oh, do ya'll know a good mail order here in Ak?...crap, i can't find one that has their stuff online....or a good catalog..sportsmans warehosue has a little bit, but, not enough to justify me getting their stuff...although their traps are cheap!..i will do that one...hey, i have been using Vern's off ebay and he is cheap to buy and ship!....i would like to use something from Ak though..the trapping shop on wassila does not have a catalog and is not online!!!......i've used the snare shop with success also....

    thanks for the advice, i appreciate it...my setup is my first problem, got to have that to be able to get setup to use technique, which i got a better handle on now...hey, i know how to use a flesher the right way now!....do i feel stupid!...

    thanks,
    scotty
    Scotty in the AK bush

  10. #10
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    Default

    Scotty, Minnesota Trapline products is a good supply house, they have a catalog or order online. I use a necker 600 knife, for years I had one of the cheap no-name brand knives and could never get it to work well. When I first made my beam I shaped it so that it was exactly the shape as the knife, I later learned better. With the knife touching all the way across the beam the force was not concentrated enough. After rounding the beam so the knife only touched in a small area it worked much better.

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