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Thread: First Alaska hunt

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    Default First Alaska hunt

    My friends and I are looking to go to Alaska for our first Moose and brown Bear hunt in two years. we are all avid Elk and Deer hunters, but never hunted Alaska. What are some good areas to look at to hunt both ? There will probably be seven of us hunting. There looks like there are a lot of good areas but I'm sure some areas have more our less of the game we are looking for. Trophies are nice but we would all like a chance to shoot a legal Moose or Bear.
    thanks
    Jason

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    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Jason

    Jason: In the first place do a lot of research on this forum using the "search". Try searching things like "brown bear hunt", float trip moose, ..... Second, http://www.state.ak.us/local/akpages/FISH.GAME/ is the link to the regulations. You will need a guide for brown bears. Moose you are OK on. But for browns, sheep and goats you need a guide.

    Understand one thing, we don't hunt big game up here. Each trip is an adventure in it's own right. Planning and surviving the adventure is first, harvesting an animal is second.

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Are you aware that non-residents must be accompanied by a registered guide ir order to hunt brown bear? You can hunt moose without a guide, but you must hire one for brown bear, sheep, or goat.

    On another note, finding an area with two or three legal moose is doable. Finding an area with 7 legal moose is darn near impossible. (Well, perhaps not impossible...but you're asking for a lot there.) Moose are very unlike deer, in that they require far more land per animal due to their large energy requirements and the lower productivity of subarctic land. Moose are unlike Elk in that they are not herd animals. They may congregate to some degree around the rut, but the only place I've ever seen 7 legal moose in a small area is in a protected park. (Perhaps some moose-hunting shangrila exists that I'm not aware of...anyone?)

    If you're set on all hunting together and going unguided, I would focus on caribou instead. Hunting out of Kotzebue or north of the Brooks Range from the Dalton Highway, it would be entirely possible for all 7 of you to connect with nice bull caribou. Besides, taking care of the meat (which is the primary legal concern once you put an animal down) of 7 caribou is doable. Taking care of the meat of 7 moose at one time would be darn near impossible.

    Good luck on your planning, and welcome to the forums.

  4. #4

    Default Random Thoughts

    Jason,

    Welcome to the forum! Some good advice given by Dave and Brian - hunting griz with a guide is gonna run each guy who wants to hunt them about $10,000 apiece in guide fees alone....I'm betting that would cause at least some of the group to rethink this. So, if you're all set on hunting and camping together, I'd suggest going after caribou as Brian and Dave have done. Moose (big enough to be legal for a non-resident) don't typically hang out in large groups during hunting season, and finding 1-2 50 inch bulls in a season is an accomplishment, let alone 7!

    Even hunting caribou (which can be done in a group of 7), you're looking at a few grand to come up and hunt....airline tix for your flights to Alaska, $85 for non-res license, $325 for a caribou tag, or $400 for a moose tag, cost of rental car(s) if you hunt the road system or bush planes if you hunt remotely, cost to fly the meat out of the bush, hotels, food, gas, etc etc...it adds up pretty quickly.

    Kudos to you for planning far in advance! Do some searches on this Forum as Dave recommended, to start to get an idea of what's involved....then come back and ask specific questions as you have them, and you'll get a lot of good advice on this forum.

    Michael

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    Thanks for all the info. Most of the guys i hunt with just got back from a Caribou hunt in Quebec, Canada were all five of them got two Caribou each. So im thinking they all want to concenttrat on Moose and brown Bear. I guess we need to find an area that has potential of one or two Moose. From what ive seen one moose would be enough meat for all of us anyway if we got one. Most of us just like being out in the wild. Most us have hunted together for 15 years. Why are guides so expensive to hunt Bear? Is it the danger involved?

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    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    sounds to me you might want to do some more research before bit off a big hunt like this in alaska, no offense but if you have to ask if there is danger invloved in a brown bear hunt you may want to do some deeper digging before you throw out some coin for an alaska hunt.

    You'll need to decide if you want to go unguided or guided
    if you go unguided you can only do moose/caribou or black bear and you'll probably be able to afford it.
    Guided will cost you around 10-15000 per person for a moose/brown bear combo and if you find a guide that will take seven of you at once, do a pile of research on him, thats ALOT of hunters in one camp for a hunt like that.

    Like mentioned before, these aren't elk, or deer and this ain't kansas. If your not ready for whats here and packing a moose out two or three miles and you've never seen muskeg or alders, this will be a suprise, the more research you do, like your doing here now, or phone calls, intenet, emails, fish and game the more you do the better trip you'll have.

    First off, figure out what your budget is then work off that.
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    we are looking to plan a hunt in two years. Thats why im asking questions to find out whats involved

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    If you have 7 guy's and you are positive you want a moose/brownie combo my guess is you will have to find an outfitter/guide that can split you guy's between 2-3 different camps, I'm no expert by any means but I have had 3 hunts in AK and I believe you would have to look at 10 days at least probably 15. Get on your computer and start researching Alaskan Brown Bears if you have to ask if they are dangerous. You don't hunt them by getting within a couple hundred yards and taking pot shots at them because the last thing you want is one wounded and pissed off its at that time you will realize you are not at the top of the food chain.

    Start reading everthing you can find on hunting in Alaska, get together as a group discuss what you have found, settle on the critters you want to go after, then pick an area that you can hunt, down load the regs, and copy them off for everyone, once you pick an area then start looking for guides and outfitters that service that area. Realize that if your hunt is 15,000.00 you will also have airfare, and if you are sucessful then you will have meat, hides and antlers to deal with which gets expensive just getting it home, you can very easy get another 2500.00 or more added on. Read what these guy's on here have to say they are not trying to give you a bunch of bull they are just trying to be realistic. Just my .02

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Guys, he didn't ask if brown bears are dangerous...he asked if the danger was the reason for the high cost of a guided hunt. That may factor into the price, but in general the answer seems to be no. This high cost is due to the price of logistics of a hunt in Alaska, plus the fact that demand far outstrips supply. Guides need to charge very high rates in order to stay in a business that is seasonal with very high up-front costs. Perhaps some tack on a bit because they know the market can bear it, but no guides are getting rich doing so. The danger of hunting brown bears is a reality, but is not the reason for the high prices.

    I, for one, commend the guy for getting on here two years in advance of the planned hunt date. He's got some unrealistic expectations, perhaps, but that's the point of asking questions, right?

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    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    i agree brian i miss read what he orginally posted.

    I commend the guy for getting a two year head start on all this, at least once they figure out what they'll be doing they may be able to secure some of the best time frames or dates.


    jmysk, sorry i miss understood, no hard feelings, feel free to inquire about anything in here, with the group you've got here you have probalby one of the great sources for alaska hunting information in the state, alot of us have done it several times and some have done it more than that, while others even live in the remote areas you'd be interested in.
    Hope we can be of some help, my first thought though is figure out what you've got to spend and that will really narrow things down in a hurry for what you can pull off.
    good luck
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    jmysk I apoligze also I should have read alittle closer, there are alot of things to factor in, you guy's need to set some kind of a budget and then work on a hunt that will fit into that budget, it might be a float hunt for moose only, or a fly-in drop camp for moose, guided or unguideed or maybe some can afford a bear hunt while some can only afford a moose hunt. I have a couple of hunt consulants names if you want them email me, with that many guy's you might need people that do it for a living. Personally I would work on a moose hunt 1st probably a fly-in drop camp or 2 and then maybe worry about a bear hunt the next trip back because once you been there you will have to go back it gets in your blood

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    Default Outfitters?

    I would contact an outfitter like Larry Bartlett or someone. You tell'em what you want and they will help you plan the hunt and provide info and maps. I think he charges like $800 per party so a group of seven that would be pretty cheap. I don't know if we have any outfitters on here; maybe (forum member) northwestalaska. I know he rents gear in the Kotzebue area. Like the other fellas said, without a guide you can't hunt brown bears.


    Tim

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    Thanks all for the info you are all right this is a lot different than hunting elk and deer witch I new it be different in that moose donít run in herds. Maybe for our first hunt it would be better not to hunt brown bear, so we can get the lay of the land. There are so many areas to choose from how do you know what is good? When you have never been there. I printed the reg's all 110 pages of it. We are supposed to get together next weekend to talk about our elk and deer trip in five weeks so we are going to talk about Alaska too.

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