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Thread: The Alaska set

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    Default The Alaska set

    What is the most diverse, multi-purpose single (or collection of) firearm(s) appropriate for the bulk of Alaska hunting? I've been fishing in SE for a few years, but I'm coming up this time to stay. In company is an 1895GS in 45-70, a blued Ruger 77 MII in .30-06 with a VX-I Leupold, and a 70s version blued Dan Wesson .357 revolver.
    Is this loadout suitable for the bulk of AK game, or do I need to supplement with something smaller, larger, faster, slower, etc? Also-with a blued barrel in the tongass, what extra precautions are worthwhile to keep rust at bay?

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    A 30-06 is a fine rifle for the majority of Alaskan game. If you're thinking seriously about pursuing coastal brown bears down there, you may want to consider something larger along the lines of a 338 or a 375, but overall the 30-06 is a fine Alaskan rifle. The only thing I would consider if I were you is trading in the 357 for a 44mag. A 44mag is a better choice for bear protection, and bears are quite common along the SE archipeligo.

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    Member 8x57 Mauser's Avatar
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    Default Filling in the gaps

    You'll want a .22 for ptarmigan and grouse.

    And probably a 12 gauge for ducks and geese.

    Then there's the .410 for halibut...

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    Member SoggyMountain's Avatar
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    Ditto Mauser ... Your existing guns are fine for most of southeast, but you might want to add one or two to the collection.

    If you plan on hunting the ABCs you might want to chamber up to a .300 WM at least.

    And, the .22 mentioned above is an absolute!

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    What are the advantages of .300WM over the .30-06? Is the velocity that big a jump over a heavier load? Eventually I'll get my dyes and the like sent over from Downeast so I could bulk up some heavier 180g loads for the .30-06, unless I'm missing something in translation between the two cartridges.

    A .22 is on my to-get-soon list. Probably the 10/22 with all it's quirky customizable features. Is $290 too much for a new 10/22 in synth/SS? Of course-if there's a used one out there all the better.

    With the one suggestion to bump up from a .357-.44mag, the Dan Wesson's from the 70s were all built to handle heavy loads-so similar to my first comment, is there a big difference between a +p .357 mag and a factory .44mag?

    For halibut, I'll use a bowie knife with built in compass.

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    Default .357 to .44

    The simple answer is yes. I have a Dan Wesson .357 also, and I use it for home protection. Even with hotter loads, you still won't be able to get the energy needed to knock down a bear. Please take .44 with you and pray you'll never need to use it.

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    Here's what I have and don't really see the need to change it.
    1 model 70 in 375 H&H for the big boys, bull moose and big brown bears.
    1 model 70 in 270 for everything else which has been weatherproofed with Black-T.
    44 mag Ruger NSBH with 320 Alaskan BackPacker HC bullets.
    For weather proofing, i'd either Black-T it or Cerakote your rifles.

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    With todays modern bullets, anything between say 6.5mm and 30 cal will kill any and all AK game, within the ranges most folks can connect at. Over 30 is merely a security blanket.

    Hard to beat a lightweight 7-08 for all around use, and a 338 or 375 just in case. Add a 223 for varmints and range work, a 12 ga for birds, 22 rf for plinking, and a 44-50 for the hip.

    To keep rust at bay, remove the barreled action and wax it. Put electrical tape over the muzzle (for all guns) and bring some rags and oil to dry off and oil the bolt and working parts.

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    Member SoggyMountain's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by estern View Post
    What are the advantages of .300WM over the .30-06? Is the velocity that big a jump over a heavier load? Eventually I'll get my dyes and the like sent over from Downeast so I could bulk up some heavier 180g loads for the .30-06, unless I'm missing something in translation between the two cartridges.
    I'll agree that you can shoot bear all day long with your .06. The .300 shoots em harder. 180 vs. 250. It is a "security blanket" as mentioned.

    Quote Originally Posted by estern View Post
    A .22 is on my to-get-soon list. Probably the 10/22 with all it's quirky customizable features. Is $290 too much for a new 10/22 in synth/SS? Of course-if there's a used one out there all the better.
    Good gun, good call, think stainless.

    Quote Originally Posted by estern View Post
    For halibut, I'll use a bowie knife with built in compass.
    Make sure you take a compass reading before poking your fish in the head! Too, bring someone with a video camera. I would like to watch this.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 8x57 Mauser View Post
    You'll want a .22 for ptarmigan and grouse.

    And probably a 12 gauge for ducks and geese.

    Then there's the .410 for halibut...
    Ditto the 12 gauge, it"s the real gun that won the west!
    ; for them that honour me I will honour, and they that despise me shall be lightly esteemed. 1 SAMUEL 2;30

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    Between rimfires, centerfires, muzzleloaders, handguns and rifles, all gauges from 410 through 10, and calibers from 17 HMR to 54, I've probably got something over 50. Seems kinda short to me, so I'll probably pick up more. If forced to choose only a few guns...... Nah, let my heirs sort them out after I'm gone.

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    Member nrc's Avatar
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    Default Need vs Want (fun)

    Need? = 22lr, plus 12 ga (with variety of shells) will do everything.

    Want, or for Fun or just collecting Toys? = Longarms I like 4570, 308, 7mag, and 375. Pistols 44m, 45lc, and 475 linebaugh.

    I can buy a rifle in a shop or a trade, and then on the way home come up with some application or scenario where I would 'need' it.

    Nate

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    .22LR bolt action, or break-open like a Contender, plus a red dot sight
    .270
    .338WM

    You can use .22 Short with the .22-caliber rifle to hunt grouse. This year I uses a kid's rifle made by Rossi. It's a .22/.410 combo that comes in a soft case with a .410 barrel as well as a .22-caliber one. I only use the .22 barrel, which proved very accurate with .22 Short.

    You can use the .270 for moose, caribou, etc., but more than likely end-up using the .338WM for most of the big game hunting.

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    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    LOL did someone say "knock down a bear?"
    Www.blackriverhunting.com
    Master guide 212

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    Member SoggyMountain's Avatar
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    Default We missed the important stuff!

    Quote Originally Posted by estern View Post
    Also-with a blued barrel in the tongass, what extra precautions are worthwhile to keep rust at bay?
    Look at your guns on occasion even if you're not using them. Like it or not, they can get surfacing just sitting in the cabinet.

    For cleaning purposes after being in the field, where I can promise they got wet, I dry them first...Then I use cleaners and lubricants the way everyone else does. Before putting the gun away, I wipe it down good with a Kleen Bore silicone cloth.

    You really want to pay attention to details (cracks and crevices) around the sights and scope mounts. Leave a single soggy spruce needle and it will make you work harder next time.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    Put electrical tape over the muzzle (for all guns) and bring some rags and oil to dry off and oil the bolt and working parts.
    Electrical tape? Most of the advice here I'm taking in humor or to heart, but wouldn't electrical tape muck with bullet exit from the barrell? You Alaska hunters know more than me, so I only ask for clarification.

    Other than a .22, most other firearms are down a bit on my to-do list, since I'm learning quickly about how expensive it is to live in SE. Something else on my short list, probably after a 22 (even though it is less expensive) is a timney trigger for the ruger 77MII. I was sighting it in a couple days ago at 175yds, and I'd forgotten how annoying was its 1/2 ton trigger pull.

    One more question-on the shotgun. Other than trap & skeet I've used shotguns little in the field (just sold a mossberg500 12G three weeks ago), so what's the value in a slug barrel gun in SE? Are shotguns like the mossberg built to accept slug and bird barrels?

    I appreciate the input.

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    The best product I've found for wiping down guns is Shooters Choice Rust Prevent. If done correctly it leaves almost a waxy finish that works great.

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    Member SoggyMountain's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by estern View Post
    Electrical tape? Most of the advice here I'm taking in humor or to heart, but wouldn't electrical tape muck with bullet exit from the barrell? You Alaska hunters know more than me, so I only ask for clarification.
    Taping the barrel is a very common practice in the field. Something I do whenever I think about it...but usually I forget.

    I've never seen it have any effect on a bullet.

  19. #19
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    The electrical tape over the muzzle has no effect on POI. I've confirmed that at the range.

    I did once trip over a deadfall in a swamp (didn't see it under the grass) and buried my rifle up to the action in the muck. I did have to run a patch through the bore to get the moisture out, but kept from obstructing the bore from muck.

    I also wrap ~5 turns of tape around the barrel just in front of the forearm of the stock. That way I always have more tape to cover up the bore after a shot (if I remember)

    Between the steep and slippery of SE, you will end up on your bumm chasing critters, so tape your muzzle, and give serious consideration to hunting with an empty chamber.

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