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Thread: SAD DAY Shrimping season closes

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    Sponsor potbuilder's Avatar
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    Default SAD DAY Shrimping season closes

    Well shrimping is over for another year. Lets hear some thoughts on how your season went. For me it was great fishing, learned a bit more about them crawley bastages. I sure noticed more pots all over the place. Tried a new "secret bait" that i thought would really kill them but i turned out to be a HUGE flop. Built a couple of new design pots, test fished them and they fished very well so i'm thinking i'll have a couple more styles of pots to display at the shows. Is it me or did you guys also notice how many more eggs the female shrimp(eggers) have on them late in the season? I'm thinking they should shorten the season a couple of weeks to give all those eggers a break. With all the pots in the water i bet we're cutting our own throats taking all those eggers. I've also noticed that the shrimp seem to get a bit "mealy or soft" later in the season, is it me or did you guys also notice that???
    OK its your turn, lets hear what you have to say.
    One other thing, it was great to meet some of you guys from the site on the docks in Whittier, nice to meet the typing with a live person.
    Thanks a bunch for all your business,
    Steve da potbuilder
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    I always throw the eggers back. Each one can carry up to 5000 future shrimp. There might be an opportunity when you sell your pots to encourage the same conservation.

    Pandilid shrimp, like Spot Shrimp, exhibit protandrous hermaphroditism...that is they start out male, spawn a few times and eventually mature into a female spawner. I think in PWS they spawn around late Oct through early Dec, give or take.

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    During my last trip I also noticed a high percentage of eggs, I eat them. Am I hurting the population by killing a female caught on 10 Sep that has eggs more than if I killed the same female on 1 Sep before it has eggs? She won't be breeding either way. If you are advovating that females shouldn't be killed then you would have to throw all the big ones back because they are all females.
    I also have been working on some new pot designs and stratagies. I am trying to find a bait that will last for 2 weeks. It seems that the more I learn about these shrimp the more questions I have. I haven't noticed a change in texture but do occasionally get a chalky one, I don't know why.
    Does anyone else feel that populations are dropping? I have 2 different areas that I have been shrimping for 6 seasons and the last 2 years both areas have produced considerably less shrimp during multiple trips. I have never seen anyones pots in the areas except mine. Both areas are fairly large. Could the shrimp I take in 5-6 trips per year affect the overall population in these areas? Is it because I take females?

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    Talking That'd make some mean Fried Rice!

    Them shrimp would! YAWOZAA!!!!

    Anywhere I can buy some for $5/lb or so???

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    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Sams

    Sams would be your best bet as it illegal for a person shrimping for personal use to sell them.

    One lodge in the SE was fined this year for doing so.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bearbait 1
    Am I hurting the population by killing a female caught on 10 Sep that has eggs more than if I killed the same female on 1 Sep before it has eggs? She won't be breeding either way. If you are advovating that females shouldn't be killed then you would have to throw all the big ones back because they are all females.
    If I'm not mistaken shrimp that have eggs have already bread. Females without eggs probably haven't been bread and may not spawn.

    About a day after the female molts into breeding form, the male attaches a sperm mass to her underside, between the last two pairs of legs. Fertilization takes place as the femal releases eggs from her oviducts and onto that sperm mass. The eggs then become attached to the forward four pairs of legs and abdominal sections. She'll carry them for about 6 months, until they mature and leave.

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    Grampy, I don't understand what you are getting at. If I kill a large shrimp the day before she (all the big ones are females) breeds she is just as dead as if I had killed her the day after she bred. I'm not trying to argue, I just don't think it makes a difference to the population when I kill a shrimp, dead is dead, I don't see the logic, just the emotion, of releasing them. If their was a biological need to release females I would support it but to do any good it would need to be based on size not just whether they have eggs yet. How many shrimp released in 300' of water would make it back to the bottom alive?

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    After the charter season this year, my father came up and a bunch of us went out halibut and shrimping.

    We did well I believe, though the guys who live there year round says we did average. I'll have to get a picture up. Right now my summer charter pics, including these shrimp pics are still on the digital. Give me a few weeks to get them all up and I'll repost the link.

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    Bearbait, you need to understand that not all females breed. And not all females that breed are large. Most breed only once, and then die after their eggs hatch. Female Spots can be anywhere from 3 to 11 years old, and breed anywhere along the way. That is exactly why some large Spots carry eggs and some don't.

    So when you kill a large Spot without eggs she may not breed for several years, or at all - particularly if she falls to predators in the mean time. When you kill an egger you kill a Spot that has made it to breeding stage, successfully bred, and has the potential to hatch thousands more shrimp. Bigger Spot females carry more eggs than little spot females, so killing the big Spots have a greater effect.

    I'm not sure why you think a released Spot wouldn't make it back to the bottom? They swim extremely fast, and are known to occupy the water column from the most extreme shallows to the greatest of depths. They frequently migrate up and down in depths feeding, particularly at night.

    I'm not advocating you do anything Bearbait, as there is no requirement to release the eggers. I do it because I have studied the habits of Spots and fished them all my life. I release them for conservation, not emotion. To each their own.

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    Thanks for sharing the info Grampy, I appreciate it. I'm always willing to learn, sometimes it just takes awhile. I think a shrimp falling through the water column would have a good chance of being eaten, maybe I'm just trying to justify killing eggers.

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    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Fair

    I had a fair year shrimping. Found some good food that works well. Purina canned chicken flavored dog food in the large cans. Pook holes with a small screw driver and it holds over a week no problem and longer.

    I just need to get away from the seiners and the out-of-towners that steal the pots and shrimp. Pretty disheartening to pull up empty pots after a 2-day soak and have nothing when the last pull you had 125 or so.

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    Dave, I've found that on long soaks, like a 2-day soak, the shrimp will eventually leave if there is nothing for them to physically grab on to and eat. Even if your bait is giving off scent, they seem to want more. With lots of time, they will find their way out. The ones that remain in the pot that you do catch seem to be recent new-comers drawn to the scent, as those shrimp are more "alive".

    I like 4-6 hour soaks with fresh hanging bait. If the shrimp aren't there by then, it's time to move. I very seldom get more shrimp in longer soaks. I guess everyone has their own methods.

    Octopus, small bottom fish, and other preditors can also clean a pot. But there's nothing worse than a Pirate. I carry a pistol for them, and will not hesitate to put holes in their boat. My buoys and gear are well marked, and there's no reason for anyone to be touching them unless they are criminals. I try to moor up within sight of my gear too.

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    I've often wondered how many shrimp enter the pot and find their way out. This year I made some parlor pots and saw no difference in catch rates compared to traditional pots. The parlor pots were designed to keep lobster from escaping after entering the pot. I saw a show on TV where they put a camera on lobster pots and the lobster came and went at will, the only ones they caught were the ones that happened to be in the pot when they pulled it. I don't know if a shrimp is as smart as a lobster. I'm working on some escape proof pots for next year for longer soaks. I wonder how long a soak could be and still be productive. How long before meat quality would suffer because of a lack of food. How long before an octopus found each pot. I will be retired next year and will have more time to experiment. I have an underwater camera with 120' of cable that I am going to put on a pot and try to come up with some answers. Hopefully I can find some shrimp that shallow.

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    We've left pots down for 2 weeks or longer and still had plenty of shrimp in them, and the meat quality was still great. I'm sure that some escaped, and we will often have an octopus in one of the pots, but it's better than having empty pots sitting dry in the boat. Besides, octopus makes excellent halibut bait.

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    Default Octapus

    Octapus is excellent in spagetti sauce.

    Yep, they come and go at will. Just need a food source to hold them on the longer sets.

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    I catch a few octopus but not many. I like eating octopus but the few I've tried to cook have been very tough, I guess I didn't beat them right. Next year I'm going to try some octopus pots interspersed with the shrimp pots. I haven't checked on the legalities of this yet. When I find the front half of empty shrimp shells in a pot I assume an octupus ate it but am not certain, could it be something else?

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    We also found our short soaks to be better then long soaks. Once on the shrimp we'd move gear around . It seemed they wouldnt stayput but wouldnt move off to fareither. We rolled pots twice a day, however had a two day soak to begin with.

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    Man I wish I lived in alaska. What an awesome place : )

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    How do you guys cook your octupus? I have caught several when I have been out and the boat owner always has us immediately cut off the head and use the tentacles for bait. The next time it might be fun to keep some of it and try to cook it up? Is it anything like calamari? I like that taste but would have no idea how to start cooking it.

    Armo

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    Here's what i believe happens, you only catch the shrimp that are around the pot so that means if you get say 50 in a 3 hour set you won't get 100 in a 6 hour set or i'll bet you won't get that many more than 50 in a overnight set. You gotta move the pot to some new ground because i don't think they will move that far to go into a pot. From what i've seen if your catching crabs, fish or them 8 armed bastages your on the wrong bottom, on 99% of my sets all i see in the pots are shrimp and some coral or rocks on the tunnels, if i get hung down on the bottom all the better.
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