Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 26

Thread: Brooks Range success

  1. #1
    Supporting Member AFHunter's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Registered Guide, AK
    Posts
    658

    Default Brooks Range success

    My wife, father, and I flew into the Ivyshak on 25 August with Coyote Air from Coldfoot. My dad tried to bring everything with him. After we cut 40 pounds of Dad's gear and an additional 15 pounds from my wife's and my gear we were off to our remote camp. We seen about 60 Dalls on our breathe taking flight. On day one we did not see a single animal from camp. Disappointing to start out. I did catch a nice fresh grayling dinner though. On the second day (First day of hunting) I made the executive decision to shoot whatever bull we saw. I thought the pickings would be slim. We decided to walk about 3 miles west/southwest in our valley and see the sights. I made the horrible decision of dropping our wader shoes for weight. My feet are still sore from crossing the Ivyshak in just chest waders. DO NOT drop the wader shoes for weight! Three miles from camp I say that I do not want to hump a caribou three miles back to camp. My dad wants to see what is just a little further around the mountain. My wife and I wish him good luck and decide to head in the direction of camp and take post on the side of a mountain about 3/4 of a mile from camp. As soon as we left my dad, I said to my wife "I hope Dad shoots a bull, but not this far from camp!" As my wife and I arrive to the base of the mountain I caught movement out of the corner of my eye and pull up the binos. Two teenage grizzlies getting out of dodge is what I see. Nice to know the bears have respect for humans. The wife believes she hears three shots and I do not hear anything and go on with glassing. My wife and I make it through 10 foot alders to the side of the mountain. While the wife sleeps I catch the two teenagers coming back towards us. I decide catching these two in 10 foot alders is not my idea of a good time and we relocate to the flat open tundra to spot. We sit for 30 minutes and my curiosity of where the bears went gets the better of me and I stand up. The teenagers have now wandered within 300 yards of us and are moving closer. The bears spot us and keep a 300 yard buffer away from us. Did I mention that Grizz season opened in 5 days from this point? Dinner is calling and we head back to the tent. My dad was suppose to be back at 5:00 and it is now 7:00. I mention to my wife that Dad is usually prompt when hunting. Ten seconds later dad emerges through the brush with a huge smile. I got one is all he can say. I did not believe him and I believe my reaction was please tell me you did not shoot it way over on the point. He says "No I shot it further around the point." Dad had prepped the meat for the night and we left the meat on the mountain for the night and were going at first light to get the meat and antlers. Day two is over and we see one caribou and two grizz.

    Day two starts early with outmeal and coffee. We decide to take only my dad's .338 and our pack frames. Meat hauling is on the agenda. We get about 1/4 mile from camp and I catch movement. Shooters and a herd full of them. I have my dad take my wife and his .338 and tell them to get in front of them and I will get my .338 and meet them in front of the herd. Off we go. I get my model 70 from the tent and get in front of the herd in a drainage and I do not see my partners. I finally catch a glimple and see that they are even with the herd. I made it in front of the herd. I hear my dad's rifle roar and I wait for my shot. What I though was about 200 yards, I count legs and wait for one nice bull to seperate. I check for good heavy tops, count legs and squeeze one round off. I think I missed. I wait for the herd to move about twenty feet and I see antlers sticking up. Mine is down. One shot smoked him and I did not even see him fall. At this point I believe my wife has shot her bull as well and I stand up. The herd starts to wander back in my wife's direction and the .338 barks again. Then I see my dad chasing the herd and my wife straggeling behind him. I yell for my wife to keep up with the herd. She stops and I believe something is wrong. When I get to her, she turns her face and all I see is blood. My dad's scope bit her pretty good.

    TO BE Continued later this afternoon
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    North Pole
    Posts
    903

    Default

    Beautiful! and congrats on the bulls.BTW! share the pic of the wife Im sure many wives have gotten bit before you just tell her its all good we like any blood here.
    Again congrats dude thats awesome.Daniel

  3. #3
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks Area
    Posts
    7,274

    Default Good Job!!!

    Way to show your Dad a great trip to Alaska. He is lucky to have such a good son.

    Congrats to you all.

    Steve

  4. #4
    Supporting Member AFHunter's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Registered Guide, AK
    Posts
    658

    Default Continued

    When I catch up with my dad he believes my wife grazed the bottom of the biggest bull on her second shot. We followed the herd for almost a mile and the bull kept up with the herd just fine. The big one did get away! Three hours later my bull is quartered and back at camp. The first night we made a meat rack on the gravel bar. This saved time, we were short on daylight for my Dad's trip. We again take one gun and pack frames and head for my Dad's meat. We decide to cross the river in our regular hunting clothes. It has been 80-90 degrees every day at this point. It takes two hours to get to Dads bull. My wife passes on several small bulls along the way. BTW when my Dad stated earlier that he shot the bull just around the corner from where we left him, he meant another mile! I pack all four quarters and scrap meat, my Dad takes the loins, and my wife packed the horns and cape. About four hours later we are back at camp with Dad's bull. About 200 yards from camp a large boar grizz is getting outta dodge as soon as he sees us. If grizz was open we would of been tagged out on bears at this point. A beautiful grizz with a blonde saddle. I know where I am getting a grizz next year. End of day total is about 50 bou and 1 grizz

    Day three is spent fleshing hides and turning the lips and ears. Eight hours work between all of us. At around 1600 we are about done fleshing and a plane lands on the gravel bar by us with eight folks and lots of gear. I was hoping it was floaters. My wife says " I have to get my bull tonight." I tell her not to worry I will get her the bull she wants. The plane lands three more times with more hunters and more gear right on top of us. I asked the other party their intentions and they plan to stay and hunt and were very respectful, saying they would let us get our bou and stay out of our way. I was not very happy that Brooks Aviation would drop two other parties of hunters on another hunting party. When Coyote Air picked us up at the end of the hunt, Dirk was not very happy about other hunters being dropped on us and stated that Brooks Aviation had dropped other hunters the previous five days on his hunters. After our chat with the other parties, who wished us good luck on our last bull, we went about 1/2 of a mile to the open tundra. We were going to go to a valley where the bou had been coming out off and half way there I wanted to stop at a choke point where we could cut bou off coming from either direction. We sat for about 20 minutes and the gnats are just starting to bother us. I catch movement about a mile away and I see all antlers through the Zeiss. I stated to the wife that there is her bull. We did not move an inch and the large bull and small yearling bull walk straight towards us. I took out my spotting scope and I was counting all of the points as the bull came closer and closer. It took about 10 minutes for the bulls to work towards us. Getting bigger and bigger every minute. I gave my wife my Cabela's pack, which is awesome, to shoot off and the little bull who is leading the two stops at 15 yards to our right. The large bull who is pointed right at us stops at 126 yards and turned broadside. I told the wife that it was OK to shoot now and her winchester model 70 in .270 barked. The bull turned to the right and I could see the blood gushing from the front quarter. I instruct her to not shoot again and the bull falls over dead. She made a perfect shot on a great bull. Lots of pictures and quartering and we are back at camp under moonlight having a celebatory shot of blackberry brandy. End of day three total about 15 bou and another one on the meat rack.

    Day four is spent fleshing and turning lips and ears on momma's bull. End of day four total is about another 10 bou in camp and I run into a friend who scored one monster dall and a nice dall, and a nice bou and a monster bou as well. They had been dropped off in the Ivy headwaters and dragged their boats about 40 miles to us. Did I mention the water was very low.

    Day five is our fly out day. We pack up in the morning and catch char until Dirk at Coyote Air picks us up.

    I forgot to mention that I shot the horn off my bull. What I thought was 200 yards (we cut my Dad's range finder for weight and I gave him mine) ended up being right at 320 yards. The stiff 20 knot wind drifted my bullet into his neck and through his antler first.

    This was a hunt that I completely planned myself. This was my first hunt in Alaska and a fly-in at that. I want to thank all of the folks on this site who share info. I am sure that I would have lost my meat in 80-90 degree weather had I not picked up meat care pointers. My meat rack stayed at 40-50 degrees during the day and we lost no meat. I also have to thank my friends who helped with questions. It had been a dream since I was a child to hunt Alaska with my dad and wife and that dream has been fullfilled. What a hunt! The moose hunt story and pics will follow in a few days.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Knik-Fairview, Alaska
    Posts
    927

    Default

    Congratulations and sorry to hear about the scope bite. Doesn't look too bad though it bled nicely. Hope your wife enjoyed the trip regardless. (I wonder why nobody sells rubber rings that fit on common scopes?)

    Brian

  6. #6
    Supporting Member AFHunter's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Registered Guide, AK
    Posts
    658

    Default meat rack shot

    I could not believe how cool our meat stayed. I used rocks and willows to get the meat a foot off of the ground then layered meat with willow branches and then covered it all with a tarp. I kept a thermometer under the tarp and the meat stayed at 40-50 degrees in 80-90 degree weather.

    The picture of the wife being bit is after we had cleaned alot of the blood off.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  7. #7
    Member SoggyMountain's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Bait Station, Alaska 99801
    Posts
    861

    Thumbs up Thumbs up

    Great weather, good company, and a plane load of meat.

  8. #8
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    North Pole
    Posts
    903

    Default

    I love it....the story the pic's and your poor wife's scope ring been there done that.And again congrats to all of you.Daniel

  9. #9
    Member fullkurl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Alaska/Idaho
    Posts
    2,162

    Default Nice!

    Great story and pics, --really enjoyed Af,
    Thanks for sharing!


    Frank

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Soldonta, Alaska
    Posts
    315

    Default Good trip

    Nice to hear someone is out having fun! I want to hunt the brooks range someday. Thanks for sharing your hunt. BC

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Soldonta, Alaska
    Posts
    315

    Default Scope Bite

    I have a friend who is a master guide who got a scar last spring on a brown bear hunt so it can happen to anyone. Like someone said, why isnt there rubber around the scope! Anyway sounds like you had a great hunt and some fine eating this winter.

  12. #12
    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    4,670

    Default

    Glad you all had such a great hunt even with the other hunters being dropped on you. Thank you for sharing your pics and story with us!

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    anchorage alaska
    Posts
    83

    Default Scope eye

    There are probably enough "Scope Eye" pictures amongst us to have a 3 page discussion with lots of photos. I know I have one. I think it must be a 338 thing! Congratulations on a great hunt.

  14. #14
    Premium Member AZinAK's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    South Central
    Posts
    527

    Thumbs up Right on!!!

    Great job to you and your dad...and your wife for taking a hard learned lesson and pressing on...those scope scars are always good stories...I will be getting my antlers back from the taxidermy this coming weekend...good luck with Steve on the future bear hunt...PM me where exactly you work again...I know what building, just forgot where in the maze...

    Chris

  15. #15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AFHunter View Post
    When I catch up with my dad he believes my wife grazed the bottom of the biggest bull on her second shot. The big one did get away! .
    Sounds like a good hunt, until I got to this point. Do you not think that your wife's hunt should have been over at this point, as described by you. You might be unfamiliar with the regs, so I suggest you read the part about what you do with the harvet permits or tags, after you TAKE an animal. Then read the definition of TAKE or TAKING. Leaves little room for interpretation or mis-understanding to me, pretty cut and dried. Even if you stalk and disturb an animal, and it gets away, your hunt is over, much less wounding one. Several have been busted for this transgression. Lots of people go on shooting critters, until they finally get one in bags though.

  16. #16
    Supporting Member AFHunter's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Registered Guide, AK
    Posts
    658

    Default Thanks Akres

    AKres,

    The harvest tag was punched on the animal that we were not sure if she hit. and the limit is more than one bou. All is good, but someone always has to put a negative spin on every post.

    To the rest of the folks who are enjoying the post. This hunt was awesome.

  17. #17

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AFHunter View Post
    AKres,

    The harvest tag was punched on the animal that we were not sure if she hit. and the limit is more than one bou. All is good, but someone always has to put a negative spin on every post.

    To the rest of the folks who are enjoying the post. This hunt was awesome.
    Sorry you interpreted my comment as being negative. Not meant that way, other than to bring attention to the fact that losing an animal constitutes taking one. From the limited amount of info in your original post, it alluded to the fact that you were attempting to take ONE caribou for each hunter. As you described the intentions of getting your wife her bull, etc. Usually if there is opportunity for multiple animals and they are near camp as described, they end up in the larder.

  18. #18

    Default thanks for sharing

    thanks for sharing. I really enjoyed it!

  19. #19
    Member martentrapper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks, Ak.
    Posts
    4,191

    Default

    Hey Akres, I like your definition. Jusdt think how many more critters would be available to us if every time a guy "in any manner disturbed" an animal, didn't kill it, but notched his tag anyway. Maybe we wouldn't need bag limits anymore!!!!!!!!!!
    Unfortunately, Akres hasn't read the proper definition. If you look under the def. of bag limit you will find, quote:
    "Animals disturbed in the course of legal hunting do not count toward the bag limit"
    So I would say that short of real evidence an animal is hit and wounded, shooting at an animal and missing it does not count as part of your bag limit.

    Glad you had a good hunt AF. I'm jealous............at least I'm jealous cuz I haven't got to hunt bou this year. However, we all should realize that safe landing areas aren't on every river or creek bend and having other hunters dropped near by is a reasl possibility in good hunting country. Can't do much about it.
    I can't help being a lazy, dumb, weekend warrior.......I have a JOB!
    I have less friends now!!

  20. #20
    New member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    western n.y.
    Posts
    6

    Thumbs up thank you AF HUNTER and WIFE

    Thanks son, yes we lived the dream of a lifetime and to do it together.. WWOOWW Be successful, safe, dry, and happy. To the rest of you, if you haven,t done this, find someone you can share it with and get out there befor you get too old. As for the scope mishap that scope did have the rubber ring on it. I load my own ammo and IT IS HOT. THANKA AGAIN for all that helped with the trip. WHAT A SUCCESS

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •