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Thread: Recycled Fish -- Fisheries conservation

  1. #1
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    Arrow Recycled Fish -- Fisheries conservation

    After communicating with Recycled Fish Executive Director Teeg Stouffer, I told him that the Alaska Outdoors Supersite would like to support their efforts. I am asking Teeg to respond to this message so he can introduce himself, and tell us more about their goal of fisheries conservation.

    For now, you can read about it in the forum announcements at the top of all the fishing forums.

    So....Teeg....tell us about Recycled Fish.

    Thanks....David

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    Thanks, David!

    Recycled Fish is really excited to have the support of the Alaska Outdoors Supersite because of the outstanding community of sportsmen gathered here.

    We're a non-profit organization that has just opened its doors to membership within the past few months. Previously, we were an educational organization that put on occasional events and did media work. Now we've expanded, and we're actively looking for anglers who are willing to stand up and be counted as stewards of the resource.

    You can find out all about us at our website, particularly in the "Who We Are" section.

    Our name, "Recycled Fish," speaks to Catch & Release, but we say we're about "Catch and Release as beyond, engaging anglers as stewards of the resource." The truth is, C&R isn't always the best solution for a fishery and there's nothing wrong with a little Selective Harvest. And C&R alone won't fix the problems facing our fisheries, it will take a holistic approach.

    Who better to lead the charge than us anglers? We're able to be effective because we have a greater passion and understanding for the resource, because we experience it first hand. It's all about stewardship.

    So right now we're giving away FREE annual memberships to everyone who is willing to take the Sportsman's Stewardship Pledge. We'll send you some free stuff in the mail when you sign up, and if you wish you can upgrade to a "Premium Membership" for a $25 donation, which entitles you to a bunch more free stuff and helps us with other conservation, education, and outreach projects.

    I could go on for pages about work to be done, partnerships, conservation and fishing, but instead will welcome questions and direct everyone to our website: www.RecycledFish.org

    We're very hopeful that many from this great community will come to our website and take the Stewardship Pledge and get a free membership.

    As always we're very grateful to our sponsors, and to support from David and this community. Thanks for helping to get the word out!

    Great adventure,

    Teeg Stouffer
    Executive Director
    Recycled Fish
    www.RecycledFish.org

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    Red face Just a little?

    Quote Originally Posted by Fish Recycler View Post
    Our name, "Recycled Fish," speaks to Catch & Release, but we say we're about "Catch and Release as beyond, engaging anglers as stewards of the resource." The truth is, C&R isn't always the best solution for a fishery and there's nothing wrong with a little Selective Harvest. And C&R alone won't fix the problems facing our fisheries, it will take a holistic approach.

    "If I were strolling through the annals of incorrectness—up past the invertible heroism of General Custer and on through the safaris of Dennis Finch-Hatton—I would expect to discern, out there in the future, catch-and-release fishing."

    —Pulitzer Prize-winning author, John McPhee, The Founding Fish, Farrah, Straus and Giroux, New York, 2002, p. 319



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    Now there's a BIG surprise...
    "Let every angler who loves to fish think what it would mean to him to find the fish were gone." Zane Grey
    http://www.piscatorialpursuits.com/uploads/UP12710.jpg
    The KeenEye MD

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    Some are just a little better than us Doc.......At least "Recycled Fish" has an open mind to the benefits of C&R as well realizing the needs and desire for some to catch and kill and the biological benefit of selective harvest.

    As a former Omaha, NE resident (Creighton '97) I would like to learn more.

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    Thumbs up No surprises with McPhee. . .

    Quote Originally Posted by fishNphysician View Post
    Now there's a BIG surprise...

    Not really, Francis and yukon. McPhee is noted for the open-mindedness and the integrity of his writing. . . probably why he won the Pulitzer Prize. Have you ever read McPhee's Coming Into the Country, his book about Alaska? Outstanding!

    His Web site, should you wish to contact him, is: http://www.johnmcphee.com/


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    Default Welcome to the jungle..

    Hi Teeg welcome to the forum.

    Defining personal ethics and responsibility for others is always a touchy subject. While I am an unabashed recreational angler that embraces catch and release and selective harvest practices, there are many folks in this State, many with deep subsistence roots, who see “playing with your food” as unethical. And you know, although I don’t share this world view, you really have got to respect it.

    FYI: I have been advocating the adoption of a selective harvest regulation for trophy fish on my favorite river as a means to reduce out of control angling pressure. My proposal is based upon the presumption that some anglers will respond to the regulation by seeking alternative angling opportunities. So while I certainly wish you luck with the C+R campaign, I selfishly hope you are not too successful at spawning hordes of anglers to take their place!

    Cheers

    Joel

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    Default site not working

    I wanted to check this out but it seems the website is now working. It said there isn't a website configured.

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    Default Welcome. . .


    I've had some problems accessing the Web site. . . while loading, my browser will crash. Anyone else?

    Teeg, welcome to the forums.


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    When I checked last night I had no problems. I will try now.....


    I used the www.recycledfish.org link and it took a little while to load, it came up fine.

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    Question Help . . .


    I just tried accessing the Web site again, 8:21 AM. The site loads partially, but before it's finished, my browser, Safari, crashes.

    Could be my computer, but all other url's load fine.

    Ideas? . . .


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    Marcus, I'm using IE 7.0 and it loaded for me . . . maybe a browser incompatibility? Dunno . . .

    Cheers,

    SH

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    Default WOrks

    Works for me. Better get rid of the Mac Marcus.

    Vietnam - June 70 - Feb. 72
    Cancer from Agent Orange - Aug. 25th 2012
    Cancer Survivor - Dec. 14th 2012

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    Default doesnt work for me

    IE7 and i get this



    www.MediaCatch.com
    Apache status: ONLINE.
    (You are seeing this page because no website has been configured to this IP.)

    ο
    ο
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    Smile Not the Mac. . .

    Quote Originally Posted by Sierra Hotel View Post
    Marcus, I'm using IE 7.0 and it loaded for me . . . maybe a browser incompatibility? Dunno . . .
    Get rid of my Mac? Hey, I only look stupid. .

    It ain't the Mac, Dave. Though I normally use Safari as a browser, I've also got an older version of Internet Exploder (5.2) in my Applications. Started IE, used the ".org" url, and the page loaded, though slowly.

    Also, just clicked on the link posted in the "New Kid on the Block" thread, and it loaded just fine.

    Anyone else using Safari?


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    Quote Originally Posted by Daveinthebush View Post
    Better get rid of the Mac Marcus.
    No need to get rid of the mac. That's like suggesting someone gets rid of their porche because it needs an oil change. Just minor maintainence, no need to throw out a superior machine.

    Marcus, have you tried downloading Firefox? I find it to be far superior to Safari on the Macs.

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    Smile Thanks. . . but. . .

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    No need to get rid of the mac. That's like suggesting someone gets rid of their porche because it needs an oil change. Just minor maintainence, no need to throw out a superior machine.

    Marcus, have you tried downloading Firefox? I find it to be far superior to Safari on the Macs.
    No, haven't tried it, but I know where I can check it out. Thanks for the idea.

    Too, were we all to get rid of our Macs, what would ol' Bill have to copy when he wants to upgrade Windows? . . .


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    Guys, I sure appreciate all these replies.

    First - I am embarrassed and dismayed about down-time with our servers. Our hosting company experienced problems over the past few days which brought our site to a screeching halt. All seems to be working great once again, please pay us a visit. If you are still having problems now, I'd love to hear about it so that we can ensure that our site is compatible with all systems. We've not heard anything to the contrary. Please feel free to e-mail me directly at FishRecycler[at]RecycledFish.org and I'll make sure our guys get on a solution straightaway.

    Second - We understand that some are opposed to C&R completely and some don't embrace it fully. That's okay. If a person is willing to say, "I plan to fish for the table, but I'm willing to make my positive impact elsewhere," that has its merits. It's going to take a collective response in many areas to keep strong fisheries strong and recover the troubled ones. What we do on the water is part of it, but a guy who practices C&R but dumps his used motor oil behind his lakeside cabin isn't really an environmental champion, either. Let's see what we CAN do to work together to see that we have something great to pass along to the next generations.

    Together, we're overcoming a mindset of wanton consumption and waste in the name of convenience (or laziness), and that's a hard thing NOT to agree with, right?

    We're "calling all stewards" and looking for those who are willing to raise their hands. If that's you, please visit our site, take the pledge, let us send you some free stuff, and if you're willing to go a step further, make a $25 donation and let us send you even more free stuff.

    Thanks much for the responses, dialogue is a good thing.

    With humble respect,

    Teeg

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    Wink Dialog can be a good thing. . . maybe. . .

    Quote Originally Posted by Fish Recycler View Post
    . . . We understand that some are opposed to C&R completely and some don't embrace it fully. That's okay. If a person is willing to say, "I plan to fish for the table, but I'm willing to make my positive impact elsewhere," that has its merits. It's going to take a collective response in many areas to keep strong fisheries strong and recover the troubled ones. What we do on the water is part of it, but a guy who practices C&R but dumps his used motor oil behind his lakeside cabin isn't really an environmental champion, either. Let's see what we CAN do to work together to see that we have something great to pass along to the next generations.

    Together, we're overcoming a mindset of wanton consumption and waste in the name of convenience (or laziness), and that's a hard thing NOT to agree with, right?

    We're "calling all stewards" and looking for those who are willing to raise their hands. If that's you, please visit our site, take the pledge, let us send you some free stuff, and if you're willing to go a step further, make a $25 donation and let us send you even more free stuff.

    Thanks much for the responses, dialogue is a good thing.

    With humble respect,

    Teeg
    Well spoken, Teeg, and I'm considering taking the pledge if I may insert the caveat "recycled through my digestive tract." . . . Just kidding. . .

    Seriously, c&r is perhaps the preeminent example of how social issues affect our fisheries. Some few years back, Alaska's Board of Fisheries, under intense lobbying efforts by special interests, attempted to make the first run of Kenai kings a catch-and-release fishery. The public reacted in a firestorm of rage, and the regulation was rescinded.

    It would seem terms such as "wanton destruction" and "waste in the name of convenience" mean radically different things to different anglers. Moreover to say "I plan to fish for the table, but I'm willing to make my positive impact elsewhere" implies if not states categorically that fishing for the table is a negative impact, a sentiment not at all held in common by all anglers.

    Yes, dialog is a good thing . . . if done between men of good will. Personally, I'd welcome dialog about c&r in the context noted above, but having tried that before with very negative results, will wait for someone else to start the ball rolling. . . . . . if it rolls at all.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Marcus View Post
    Well spoken, Teeg, and I'm considering taking the pledge if I may insert the caveat "recycled through my digestive tract." . . . Just kidding. . .

    Seriously, c&r is perhaps the preeminent example of how social issues affect our fisheries. Some few years back, Alaska's Board of Fisheries, under intense lobbying efforts by special interests, attempted to make the first run of Kenai kings a catch-and-release fishery. The public reacted in a firestorm of rage, and the regulation was rescinded.

    It would seem terms such as "wanton destruction" and "waste in the name of convenience" mean radically different things to different anglers. Moreover to say "I plan to fish for the table, but I'm willing to make my positive impact elsewhere" implies if not states categorically that fishing for the table is a negative impact, a sentiment not at all held in common by all anglers.

    Yes, dialog is a good thing . . . if done between men of good will. Personally, I'd welcome dialog about c&r in the context noted above, but having tried that before with very negative results, will wait for someone else to start the ball rolling. . . . . . if it rolls at all.
    Marcus - you make some great points.

    There is no doubt that keeping a fish for the table is not "wanton destruction" or "waste in the name of convenience." However, we do live in a culture where there is a phenomenal amount of waste in the name of convenience, and it spills into our habits on the water. Regardless, what we do in our everyday lives impacts what's happening with our fisheries, so as sportsmen we have to look at our habits both on and off the water and see that we are living as a steward.

    Our capitalistic / consumeristic society positions us to view everything from a consumption mindset. As my life on earth has impact, I hope that among that impact is an increase in the mindset of stewardship, which is at the very least a more functional, sustainable look at consumption.

    You made a good statement that will shape how I speak to the topic - "plan to fish for the table" is not necessarily bad, I agree. Selective Harvest has its place, and fish absolutely find their way to my table from time to time. But harvest should be done responsibly and selectively. Currently there are both fantastic examples of this occurring and terrible examples of abuse, waste. We have ESA listed salmon down in Washington which are legal for harvest. This is poor management. Anglers who choose to harvest those fish are making an irresponsible choice, regardless of the law. Anglers also harvest fish which are not legal for harvest, and that is an irresponsible choice as well. And sometimes there are fish which are not ESA listed, but are legal for harvest, and yet harvesting them diminishes the quality of the fishery. It's up to the angler whether or not they care to diminish the fishery for everyone in the name of having something for themselves. We hope to encourage them to look at the whole.

    Catch and Release will never solve the problems facing our fisheries on its own, and harvest can be a healthy part of a fishery. Over-harvest is not the biggest problem facing many of our fisheries, and it's not the sole problem facing any of them. C&R and harvest rates are one component, but it's one component upon which we individually and collectively have direct, tangible, measurable impact.

    Overall, the perception that fishing must equal fish harvest is one that exists within the greater culture, increasingly less and less among the sportfishing sub-culture. Recycled Fish views this as a positive trend, wants to speed its course, and help direct it into the culture at large. I understand clearly that there are different social and cultural dynamics at work in Alaska, but Alaska also has a different environmental dynamic than most places. I'm sure you agree.

    That's not to say that there is an excuse for over-harvest in Alaska, or that over-harvest does not, or is not, occurring. Some of us may choose to take it upon ourselves to "make up for the other guy" and limit our harvest beyond that which we normally would, knowing that in doing so we are creating an offset to steward the resource well.

    And if the fish a man keeps is never beyond his legal limit, completely within "his rights" (which is a limited viewpoint) then he might seek his offset - his place in which he'll "make up for the other guy" - in another area of impact, which would have value.

    Warmest regard, good will and best intentions,

    Teeg Stouffer

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