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Thread: Favorite trout net (material)?

  1. #1

    Default Favorite trout net (material)?

    I asked this question over in the flyfishing, because that is what I tend to do, but it really applies to any fishing method for trout.

    "Just wanted to see what is your favorite trout (and grayling and dollies) net? The type of net you sling over your back when not in use, not some for shore or boat angling.

    I have been using one more recently that fish get tangled in sometimes. Maybe the better question to ask is, what material/style of net do you use and like?

    For catch and release fishing I like getting the fish off the hook as quick as possible and swimming free, so I am looking to buy a new net to help toward that end..."

  2. #2
    Member Danny Boy's Avatar
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    Default

    Something with a rubber bag works best for trout and you'll have minimal instances of your hook getting tangled in the webbing. Tight lines!!!

  3. #3
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    Default Nets

    Danny boy had it right. For catch and release fishing there is nothing better than the nets with the rubber bags. They tend to not wipe all the protective slime off the fish. Hooks don't get hung up in them as easily either.

  4. #4

    Default thanks, something like this?

    Awesome, thanks for the thoughts. Is this the type of net you guys have in mind? http://www.frabill.com/cgi-bin/frabi...6?store=spring

  5. #5

    Default Trout net

    I have a Fabril that I use for silvers and trout. I love the net, however one caution if you use it for silvers also: I have a couple of webs broken from squirming coho's and discovered this as a nice rainbow found its way through the net... we were able to land, unhook and safely release the bow without harm, but keep your eyes open for this... I will buy a Fabril any day of the week...it has worked flawlessly up to this point...

  6. #6

    Default thanks alaskanfishguides

    Quote Originally Posted by alaskanfishguides View Post
    I have a Fabril that I use for silvers and trout. I love the net, however one caution if you use it for silvers also: I have a couple of webs broken from squirming coho's and discovered this as a nice rainbow found its way through the net... we were able to land, unhook and safely release the bow without harm, but keep your eyes open for this... I will buy a Fabril any day of the week...it has worked flawlessly up to this point...
    Excellent. If you are happy with it, I am sure I will be. I will keep an eye out for holes. Have you found a way of fixing them?

  7. #7
    Member alaskachuck's Avatar
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    Default

    I have a frabil and we love it. best trout and dolly net we have bought
    Grandkids, Making big tough guys hearts melt at first sight

  8. #8

    Default Fixing Fabrils

    Quote Originally Posted by beng View Post
    Excellent. If you are happy with it, I am sure I will be. I will keep an eye out for holes. Have you found a way of fixing them?
    Other than buying a new bag, I don't know of a way to mend this net. I suppose one could try ShoeGoo or simply using twine to tie the loose ends??? Nevertheless, even if I have to replace the bag, I am still very happy with the net... it performs exactly as expected... it certainly is not the net's fault that the K-15's (for coho of course) are ripping the webs..

  9. #9

    Default time to buy

    Quote Originally Posted by alaskachuck View Post
    I have a frabil and we love it. best trout and dolly net we have bought
    That confirms it, I am buying a rubber Frabil. To fisherman can't be wrong. I will stop by Sportsman and see if they carry 'em.

  10. #10

    Default

    I don't use a net at all. Pain in the A-- when scrambling through brush, logjams etc. I use mainly barbless hooks, and try to release the fish by grabbing the hook bend and inverting it; if the line is kept taught and the fish is still partially in water they don't flop around and get all scratched up and deslimed. It can be done.

  11. #11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by stevesch View Post
    I don't use a net at all. Pain in the A-- when scrambling through brush, logjams etc. I use mainly barbless hooks, and try to release the fish by grabbing the hook bend and inverting it; if the line is kept taught and the fish is still partially in water they don't flop around and get all scratched up and deslimed. It can be done.
    Stevesch,

    I can agree at times, however in this cooler water, these fish are very active. Indeed a nice dolly is like an alligator when it comes to flipping and twisting. I too use only barbless hooks, but if the fish is not quickly controlled they will wind themselves up in the line, which can get into and injure the gills. I have used the method you stated and had the fish literally swim out of the water onto the shore... a net is simply a more effective way to control the fish for a quick and safe return.

    Nevertheless, even with a net close by, with smaller fish, I will often go netless, but these fish are easy to manage single handed. Truly, the net is not for my convenience, but for the efficient, thus quick, landing and safe release.

    Beng,

    If you can't find one at Sportsman's, consider Trustworthy in Soldotna.

  12. #12

    Default I agree, in many situations

    Quote Originally Posted by stevesch View Post
    I don't use a net at all. Pain in the A-- when scrambling through brush, logjams etc. I use mainly barbless hooks, and try to release the fish by grabbing the hook bend and inverting it; if the line is kept taught and the fish is still partially in water they don't flop around and get all scratched up and deslimed. It can be done.
    stevesch,
    it is funny you say that. I have fished for 25 years, using a net only on a few occasions. I guess that is why I know so little about them. I fished a lot of (close to most, I would say) of the good creeks and rivers of Colorado. Most of the fish were small and I was able to release them fine without a net. Also, though, I think more recently I have started to care a lot more about the fish and really want to make sure I am doing as little to stress the fish out as possible (dont get me wrong, I am not saying you aren't doing a great job of getting them off and swimming with little stress).

    And recently I have found myself in situations where I was like, 'my, a net would be handy'. I was fishing a creek three weeks ago that had steep banks and I was waste deep in water, I had a sizable dolly on and geez, it wouldn't stop moving. With a net more recently I was able to net it, keep it in the water, remove hook and get it on it's way (minus the tangle issue that I am hoping to address with a new style net). Net properly the fish seems to calm a bit. Another time this season I had a really nice rainbow and had waded into a deep section far from shore. Every time I moved my hand toward the fish it would splash hard and I would let if run some more. I have caught and release thousands of fish and plan to release a lot more, without a net, but for the fish's well-being I plan to have a net at hand, unless I know the fish will be real small.

    But I agree with you for a lot of situations and the more skill one has the less a net is needed.

  13. #13

    Default

    Beng:

    You just gotta keep the line vertically taught on those dollies, they like to "spin" otherwise. If they spin with the line taught, it tends not to wrap around them.

    I would have to learn your netting technique. Every fish I've tried with a net makes a god-aweful tangle/snarl out of everything. Especially big fish.

    I know watcha mean about them not quitting moving. You just gotta get the hang of grabbing the bend in the fly when you have the chance. If you grab the fly, of course, you'll probably ruin it. I've ruined some flies.

  14. #14

    Default indeed

    Quote Originally Posted by stevesch View Post
    Beng:

    You just gotta keep the line vertically taught on those dollies, they like to "spin" otherwise. If they spin with the line taught, it tends not to wrap around them. .
    thanks stevesch. It feels like I have tried everything, and usually can get them. I will really focus on this and see if I have different results.

    Quote Originally Posted by stevesch View Post
    I would have to learn your netting technique. Every fish I've tried with a net makes a god-aweful tangle/snarl out of everything. Especially big fish.
    I am definately no netting pro, but what I have been doing is net the fish while it is facing upstream and line very tight. I dont lift the net up out of the water. I just get the fish in it and try to keep it suspended with the net (lightly lifting the fish with the net). Remove hook. Spin net to let fish out.

    Quote Originally Posted by stevesch View Post
    I know watcha mean about them not quitting moving. You just gotta get the hang of grabbing the bend in the fly when you have the chance. If you grab the fly, of course, you'll probably ruin it. I've ruined some flies.
    Yup, I know just what you mean. Using a pair of medical pliers might help with getting the fly by the bend, even when deeper in mouth, and getting the fish on it's way and not ruining the fly...
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  15. #15
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    Default Nothing But Net.

    Frabil when needed.
    Last edited by fishook; 04-07-2008 at 15:28.

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