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Thread: Stupid Question on a Moose Tag

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    Member COtoAK's Avatar
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    Default Stupid Question on a Moose Tag

    Okay... so I feel really stupid asking this question here, but if I don't, I won't have an answer for it. It's stupid because I didn't even get the idea of doing it until I was driving back from Fairbanks after our daily Sunday routine. TODAY!

    Now... here are the basic questions.

    How do you 'put in' for a Moose Tag?
    How long does it take?
    I know that it's bowhunting only in our area.
    Is it as simple as going to Sportsmen's and obtaining one, or do I have to apply for it, get selected, and then have a tag (which I think that's really the case).

    Now... if it's not... and I AM actually able to obtain a tag...
    ...I'd like to know if someone could help me harvest the moose. I would REALLY like to have meat in the freezer for the winter AND surprise the husband once he gets back from guiding. I'll divide it up with whomever helps me and maybe even grill some for the family at our place.

    Also... if this doesn't work this year and I DO have to get selected, then that's not a problem at all... I'll just wait next year to 'surprise' the husband and that will give me a little more time to learn how to harvest my own moose, too... but all in all, this is something that I REALLY want to do, I just don't know the logistics of it because the husband is the resident expert between us and he's... well... guiding.

    Thanks for your responses in advanced!
    THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU!!!
    ~COtoAK
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    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    Default

    First, read the regulations cover to cover, it explains things pretty well...

    So heres how it works, theres three types of hunts in this state (aside from federal subsistence) Harvest, Registration and Draw, in the regs it says what particular area is what the the requirements of a legal animal (usualy 50" 3 brow tine or spike fork) and it says the type of hunt.

    For "Harvest Hunts" go to a licsense vendor and get a harvest ticket which you must carry with you in the field
    For Registration hunts you have to go to ADF&G (usually) and get your permit
    For draw hunts you put into a lottery and if you get selected they mail you a permit

    If you are a non resident tag you have to buy a tag per animal I assume you can get these at all license vendors but I don't know (cause I'm a resident)
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ak_powder_monkey View Post
    First, read the regulations cover to cover, it explains things pretty well...

    So heres how it works, theres three types of hunts in this state (aside from federal subsistence) Harvest, Registration and Draw, in the regs it says what particular area is what the the requirements of a legal animal (usualy 50" 3 brow tine or spike fork) and it says the type of hunt.

    For "Harvest Hunts" go to a licsense vendor and get a harvest ticket which you must carry with you in the field
    For Registration hunts you have to go to ADF&G (usually) and get your permit
    For draw hunts you put into a lottery and if you get selected they mail you a permit

    If you are a non resident tag you have to buy a tag per animal I assume you can get these at all license vendors but I don't know (cause I'm a resident)
    I am in the Fairbanks/North Pole/Salcha/Two Rivers area by the way.
    I am a resident. I do have my fishing license.

    I know that this sounds unreal, but there are no 2007 Regulations to be heard of in this town. They were gone last week before we went to Valdez and there were none when I did my bachelorette party shopping yesterday at Sportsmens. (Yes.. Advantage Max 4 lingerie for the lady, might I add).

    I had originally thought that the Fairbanks area is cow moose only and it's bowhunting only, thus my posting on this particular area of the forums (and not just the regular hunting forums).

    Someone just PMed me that I could just go to my local vendor and obtain a green tag. Hm. Is this correct? If it's that easy, I am going to Sportsmens first thing tomorrow morning and I will go and get my first cow moose while the kidlets are in school.
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    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default COtoAK

    The regulations are here online.

    http://www.wildlife.alaska.gov/index...gulations.main

    There was one cow area below North Pole for firearms that you could register for but it closed last week.

    The cow area around Fairbanks is archery only and is a draw hunt.

    You can archery hunt for any bull in the Fairbanks managment archery only area.

    Stop over to the Fish and Game office on College and they will be more than happy to help you. It is about 1/2 mile from the KFC store down from Sam's.

    Vietnam - June 70 - Feb. 72
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daveinthebush View Post
    The regulations are here online.

    http://www.wildlife.alaska.gov/index...gulations.main

    There was one cow area below North Pole for firearms that you could register for but it closed last week.

    The cow area around Fairbanks is archery only and is a draw hunt.

    You can archery hunt for any bull in the Fairbanks managment archery only area.

    Stop over to the Fish and Game office on College and they will be more than happy to help you. It is about 1/2 mile from the KFC store down from Sam's.
    Darn. Okay...
    Well... I don't feel I am experienced enough to do firearms yet, so it's okay that it closed last week.

    Cow area and draw hunt ended in March, it looks as if... so I suppose I can't do that one.

    If I could do archery for Fairbanks on a bull, then this might be something I would consider... only problem is that there are not many bulls that I have seen recently, unless they are the ones smacked and donated to non-profits on the side of Badger Road.

    Maybe I will go ahead and take a chance to go over to F&G and see what they have to say. Even if I don't get the answers I want, a jog at Creamers Field to scare the geese sounds appealing.
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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Here is a link to the hunting regulations, and here are the regulations specific to your unit, Unit 20. That will be a good place to start in making your plans.

    First of all, if your area is bowhunting only (which I assume it is, since you mentioned living near the pipeline), you must be a certified bowhunter to hunt the area. I can only assume that you are not, as you are new to hunting. Shooting a bow proficiently takes some practice, but if you set next year as your goal then that is certainly attainable.

    I must admit that I am clueless when it comes to the Fairbanks/North Pole area. If you are in the "Fairbanks Management Area", then the regulations concerning legal bull moose are pretty liberal, but again you must be a certified bowhunter. Take a very close look and, even better, go to the local ADF&G office and talk about your options with someone there. Unit 20B is broken into 5 different management areas, each having specific regulations that must be followed. It can be a steep learning curve in figuring out what is and is not legal, but don't be detered - with some ADF&G help it will all become quite clear.

    As for the tag requirements, it seems that most of your area is open to hunting with a general harvest ticket, which is the type that you can pick up at Sportsman's Warehouse (or Fred Meyers, Carrs, etc.). There are some antlerless (cow) moose hunts that are resticted to a drawing permit, and some hunts in the Minto Flats area that are done by Registration permit, but otherwise it looks like it is all pretty open.

    If you're serious about this, you should also rent or buy a copy of the "Is this moose legal" video that ADF&G has at their office. Determining a legal moose takes practice, and you don't want to ruin your first experience by taking a sub-legal bull. There have also been some great threads here about determining legality, so check the archives for that.

    .........

    I just noticed your last question and statement about getting your first cow moose while the kids are in school. First of all, most of the cow moose hunting in your area is by drawing permit only. If you want to apply for these for next year, the application period is in May. Secondly, properly taking care of a moose at the kill site will take anywhere from 3-6 hours, possibly longer when it is your first time. Do not underestimate their size or the challenge of butchering and packing a moose. I'm sure you're up the challenge (you seem like the determined type! ), but don't just try to do this during the school day. You can't leave the kill site until you have taken care of all the meat, and that can't be done in such a short time. Furthermore, you will most certainly want to have someone experienced along to guide you and to help you lift legs that can weigh well over 100lbs when removed from the body.

    Best of luck to you!

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by COtoAK View Post
    Well... I don't feel I am experienced enough to do firearms yet, so it's okay that it closed last week.
    Although bowhunting opens up more options and is hugely rewarding, it is most certainly more difficult and takes way more practice than hunting with a firearm. Additionally, one must take a class and pass a shooting proficiency test to hunt in a bowhunting-only area.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    Here is a link to the hunting regulations, and here are the regulations specific to your unit, Unit 20. That will be a good place to start in making your plans.

    First of all, if your area is bowhunting only (which I assume it is, since you mentioned living near the pipeline), you must be a certified bowhunter to hunt the area. I can only assume that you are not, as you are new to hunting. Shooting a bow proficiently takes some practice, but if you set next year as your goal then that is certainly attainable.

    I must admit that I am clueless when it comes to the Fairbanks/North Pole area. If you are in the "Fairbanks Management Area", then the regulations concerning legal bull moose are pretty liberal, but again you must be a certified bowhunter. Take a very close look and, even better, go to the local ADF&G office and talk about your options with someone there. Unit 20B is broken into 5 different management areas, each having specific regulations that must be followed. It can be a steep learning curve in figuring out what is and is not legal, but don't be detered - with some ADF&G help it will all become quite clear.

    As for the tag requirements, it seems that most of your area is open to hunting with a general harvest ticket, which is the type that you can pick up at Sportsman's Warehouse (or Fred Meyers, Carrs, etc.). There are some antlerless (cow) moose hunts that are resticted to a drawing permit, and some hunts in the Minto Flats area that are done by Registration permit, but otherwise it looks like it is all pretty open.

    If you're serious about this, you should also rent or buy a copy of the "Is this moose legal" video that ADF&G has at their office. Determining a legal moose takes practice, and you don't want to ruin your first experience by taking a sub-legal bull. There have also been some great threads here about determining legality, so check the archives for that.

    .........

    I just noticed your last question and statement about getting your first cow moose while the kids are in school. First of all, most of the cow moose hunting in your area is by drawing permit only. If you want to apply for these for next year, the application period is in May. Secondly, properly taking care of a moose at the kill site will take anywhere from 3-6 hours, possibly longer when it is your first time. Do not underestimate their size or the challenge of butchering and packing a moose. I'm sure you're up the challenge (you seem like the determined type! ), but don't just try to do this during the school day. You can't leave the kill site until you have taken care of all the meat, and that can't be done in such a short time. Furthermore, you will most certainly want to have someone experienced along to guide you and to help you lift legs that can weigh well over 100lbs when removed from the body.

    Best of luck to you!
    I am not going to respond to this one in order, just to forewarn you.

    I know that it will take quite some time to quarter the moose and pack it out, but the moose I have been seeing in the area are basically in sight, off the road... I could almost touch them. So, being that they are so close, it shouldn't be all that hard getting them back into my vehicle.
    Second, the husband has one particular friend that owes us big favors and I know that he would be more than willing to come and help me out on the drop of a hat. Kids are all in school by 11am, out by 330pm.. and I could have someone part of my carpool keep the kids until I am finished with the husband's buddy or whomever once I start into determining how I am going to divide it up and what to send to Delta Meats

    This will not be my first time doing archery and bowhunting. Even though I am a novice when it comes to hunting in Alaska, it doesn't mean that I haven't done it before. Colorado is a GREAT place to learn and pick up on hunting as well... especially when you learn how to determine sights on the bow better than.... the exhusband. (laughing HARD)

    It looks as if my best bet is to go to F&G tomorrow and ask my plethora of questions and hope to walk away being satisfied in obtaining some kind of tag so that I could put some meat in the freezer for the winter.

    Thank you for the luck.
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  9. #9
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by COtoAK View Post
    This will not be my first time doing archery and bowhunting. Even though I am a novice when it comes to hunting in Alaska, it doesn't mean that I haven't done it before.
    Right on! Glad to hear that you're bringing some experience to the table. Have to taken and passed an IBEP bowhunting course in Colorado? If so, you're good to go.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    Although bowhunting opens up more options and is hugely rewarding, it is most certainly more difficult and takes way more practice than hunting with a firearm. Additionally, one must take a class and pass a shooting proficiency test to hunt in a bowhunting-only area.
    ...and there you have it.
    I should have known this before...
    That's the hard thing about being here is being completely uneducated about these circumstances and living in a place where... the laws are just so much more different then where I am originally from.

    If I were in Colorado... I know what I would have been able to do and I would be up in Kremling doing a climb and scouting for elk...
    ...but I am not there... I am here. In Alaska.

    I suppose I am left to doing just that... obtaining my certification... and practicing on our wood deer on our property.

    *sigh*
    I couldn't have been more disappointed...
    ...not unless I was able to take that class and obtain the certification this week before my husband returns from guiding.

    *sigh*
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    Right on! Glad to hear that you're bringing some experience to the table. Have to taken and passed an IBEP bowhunting course in Colorado? If so, you're good to go.
    Sure didn't. Wished I had, now. The opportunity existed back then as well.
    *disappointed*
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    Default Impetuous

    It looks as if I revealed quite a bit about being from a city by being impetuous. Nothing comes quickly here in Alaska.
    It's possible, though. It's only a year. Certification will be easy... but at least my answer to my question came as quick as my idea to bowhunt in the first place.
    So...
    Practice.
    Certification.
    Obtain the draw in May.
    Obtain the tag for a bull when season comes back around (so that I could have both).


    Well... if there is a spring moose hunt, maybe I'll just consider doing that one as well.

    Gosh... bowhunting is more rewarding, though.
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  13. #13

    Default Can't have both...

    Quote Originally Posted by COtoAK View Post
    Practice.
    Certification.
    Obtain the draw in May.
    Obtain the tag for a bull when season comes back around (so that I could have both).
    You can't hunt for both bulls and cows at the same time.

    One of the conditions (at least this year) is that if you are drawn for an antlerless permit (cow permit), you are not allowed to hunt for bulls in the same unit. This is not all that common that I am aware of, but is the case in the Fairbanks area for whatever reason. You have to make your decision as to what you want to hunt for when you apply for the permits. If you prefer to hunt for bulls, don't bother applying for the cow permit. If you don't mind, apply for the cow permit since you may have better luck locating a cow than a bull so the success rate would be higher.

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    Quote Originally Posted by anchskier View Post
    You can't hunt for both bulls and cows at the same time.

    One of the conditions (at least this year) is that if you are drawn for an antlerless permit (cow permit), you are not allowed to hunt for bulls in the same unit. This is not all that common that I am aware of, but is the case in the Fairbanks area for whatever reason. You have to make your decision as to what you want to hunt for when you apply for the permits. If you prefer to hunt for bulls, don't bother applying for the cow permit. If you don't mind, apply for the cow permit since you may have better luck locating a cow than a bull so the success rate would be higher.
    Actually... I prefer meat in the freezer. If that entails a bull, I'll take a bull. If that's a cow, I'll take a cow.
    What I meant was that I could have 2 different tags for 2 different areas close to 'home' so that when that opportunity exists, I have friends to call on and a brother in law that lives close that could all help me out if the husband is guiding at this time next year (and most likely, he will be)... or maybe if neither are available, someone from these boards could help me out as well. I am learning that there are a lot of close 'neighbors' that tune into here as well.
    Good suggestion on obtaining permits, though. I definitely wanted to get the cow permit. It's difficult not to try. Just last week, we saw three moose hit by cars and two of them were on our commute to school (so... within 3 minutes). Yesterday, while driving, she was staring straight at us and my middle son looked at me thinking the same exact thing... and then he said it..."Mom, could we eat THAT moose?"
    ...and we could have...
    ...if I had that tag, if I was certified, and if I had the bow in the back of our vehicle.

    Thanks again for your response.
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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by COtoAK View Post
    Practice.
    Certification.
    Obtain the draw in May.
    Obtain the tag for a bull when season comes back around (so that I could have both).
    Just thought of one more thing - you must obtain your certification before the May application period. If you don't have your certification # on the application, it will be rejected by F&G. Winter may not be the best time to practice with a bow, but I'm sure there is an indoor range somewhere in the Fairbanks area that you can use. Also, certification classes fill up well in advance, so you'll need to check into that a few months in advance.

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    Default Indoor Range

    Archery is very rewarding but it does take practice and patience. I would recomend going to Kings Knock in Fairbanks or if you can get on Eielson they have an indoor bow range there as well.

  17. #17

    Default Resident status

    Are you a "true" resident, or a military resident? Huge difference. Military and their spouses get special rules, but to hunt big game, you must purchase non-resident tags at half price if you are in Alaska for less than a full year. I came up in the military in 1984, and had to go through that myself.
    Now just why in the hell do I have to press "1" for English???

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    Just thought of one more thing - you must obtain your certification before the May application period. If you don't have your certification # on the application, it will be rejected by F&G. Winter may not be the best time to practice with a bow, but I'm sure there is an indoor range somewhere in the Fairbanks area that you can use. Also, certification classes fill up well in advance, so you'll need to check into that a few months in advance.
    Yes... I had a nice gentleman PM me all the information I will need including dates, times, locations and another nice gentleman suggested locations to practice indoor and outdoor (although I could always bring my deer inside and practice).
    Next class is in October it looks as if I would have to get into that one pretty quickly if I want to consider a November hunt (from another suggestion on PM), but I think that I might be over committed this month with other various life items, but since the testing is the first week of October, I might be able to do that.
    Thanks for remembering and reposting, though.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wombat View Post
    Archery is very rewarding but it does take practice and patience. I would recomend going to Kings Knock in Fairbanks or if you can get on Eielson they have an indoor bow range there as well.
    Thanks for your suggestion on a bow, too.
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    Default hilarious...

    Quote Originally Posted by Hawken54 View Post
    Are you a "true" resident, or a military resident? Huge difference. Military and their spouses get special rules, but to hunt big game, you must purchase non-resident tags at half price if you are in Alaska for less than a full year. I came up in the military in 1984, and had to go through that myself.
    You know... I actually had to laugh and smile at your response, but I understand why you stated it.
    I am a bonafide resident. Local. Moved here to move and live here (and it was for...love). We are not in the military (although my husband is ALWAYS asked this).
    I, too, have waited the full year to become a resident.
    I, too, am still waiting on the 2 year residency rule in order to continue my education.
    Not military, but was a military child. I am proud of my father as he served our country in the Navy for many, many years.

    Talking tags... I still don't quite understand the distinguishments between harvest, draw, lottery and you had to throw in military... (chuckles).
    I'll start understanding them sooner than later.
    Thanks for the smiles, though.
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