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Thread: Judging Moose Spread

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    Member Bear74's Avatar
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    Default Judging Moose Spread

    Was curious about how some of you judge your moose if the brows aren't there.

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    Default Conjecture

    My all around knowledge is just from what I've heard from others, but using the ears as a guide to guess the spread has been the common denominator for the conversations I've been party to. 9" is the average spread, I guess, from ear tip to ear tip. The other half of this conversation is that the moose have articulating ears and it's usually not easy to get a good view of them facing you so that you can judge it. I know this really sounds ambiguous but that's the best info I have, anyone else care to venture into this?
    "He who is slow to anger is better than the mighty, and he who rules his spirit is better than he who takes a city." ~ Proverbs 16:32

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    Default Anyone have a better idea??

    I have been watching a bull for two nights at about 400-600 yards. I have not been able to get a good view to count brow tines, but he does seem to be a good size bull. I want to shoot but don't want to kill an illegal bull.

    Any help would be great!!!
    Good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes from bad judgment.

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    Member Bear74's Avatar
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    Default need help Motorboatn?

    I'll give you a hand. Just tell me your location and I'll come on over and help. HA! Good luck with that guy.

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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by motorboatn View Post
    I have been watching a bull for two nights at about 400-600 yards. I have not been able to get a good view to count brow tines, but he does seem to be a good size bull. I want to shoot but don't want to kill an illegal bull.

    Any help would be great!!!
    A taxidermist friend told that it is almost always exactly 7 1/2 inches from one boss to the other on a mature bull (the rough nubs where the antlers attach to the head) and on that basis, if each antler stuck out 3 times that length from that spot you would be over 50 inches. Three times 7 1/2 = 22 1/2 times 2 = 45 inches plus the boss spread of 7 1/2 = 52 1/2. I strongly suggest that you measure a few on mounts beforehand to see if this indeed holds true.

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    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Default

    A trick I've used when stand hunting is to cut some willows to 50" lengths and go out ahead of time and tack or tie them in a horizontal position on trees at rough distances (i.e. 50, 100, 150 yards) and at least 6 feet off the ground. Then, when you're sitting in your tree stand and the bull walks by, you have those sticks out there to use as references for judging the spread and they double as range markers for your shot distance.

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    Member tccak71's Avatar
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    Default Search the archives...

    I know this was discussed last year and I think there were pictures included too. Another hint...If the beam of the antler goes outward, then down a bit and back up its probably 50". If the beam/antlers are V shaped it is definately not legal.

    Tim

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    On most mature bulls, the distance from ear tip to ear tip is about 30" when they are laid out flat. The length of an ear is roughly 10". So, imagine the ears laid out flat. If there is another ear length to the outer part of the farthest reaches of the antlers on each side, then it is roughly a 50" bull, give or take a few inches. If you have an ear and a half on each side, then the bull is in the upper 50s to near 60 inches. If you have an extra two ears of distance per side, then you've got something good - in the upper 60's almost 70.

    Now I don't hunt in a brow tine/50" spread restricted area. But this rule of thumb helps me judge the spread in inches for trophy quality. It has worked well for me. I would hold out for about an extra ear and a half per side before pulling the trigger in case your bull is genetically endowed with shorter ears.

  9. #9

    Default 50 " Moose rack Judging

    Here are a few other tips.

    A moose's eyes are 10 inches apart, so, add two heads on both sides to get the 50". (Imagine 5 heads)

    If a moose is broad side to you, and he turns to look at you, and his antlers go past his shoulder hump, then he is most likely over 50". Be sure though that he is broadside and not quartering away or towards you.

    These are just a few more tricks to help. It is always hard in the field to judge and we are not always in the perfect spot. If in doubt, let him walk!

    Check out Leupolds new rangefinder, RX-IV Boone & Crockett with Trophy Scale, which, when set at 50", displays a 50" guide at different distances.

    http://www.leupold.com/hunting-and-s...ckett-edition/
    Leupold || RX-IV Digital Laser Rangefinder Boone and Crockett Edition

    Good luck!

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