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Thread: Stephenson Warmlite Tents

  1. #1

    Default Stephenson Warmlite Tents

    In my moose hunting plans, I'm trying to gear up for next year's sheep hunt. I'm looking into the Stephenson's Warmlite tents to add to the list of items to pick up. I think I'm going to do a solo hunt and want to minimize weight and still have an actual tent as opposed to a bivy or Tarpateepee thing. I'm looking at their 2R model and was interested in what other options people would add to theirs. I am looking at basically the larger door, endliners, wind stabilizers and some extra mesh pockets. I'm leaning towards the aluminized top and an extra large mesh window as well. I know they're pricey, but all good gear is. Any ideas or options are welcomed. I have a Bibler Eldorado, but want something even lighter and I want to get away from the single layer condensation trap. The bibler works decent, but I really want to try out a Warmlite. Thanks for any tips or info.

  2. #2
    Member nibenza's Avatar
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    Default You might check out

    http://www.tarptent.com/index.html

    Buck Nelson used one on his 1000 mile trek across Alaska last year.
    You can check the story out at

    http://www.bucktrack.com/Alaska_Broo..._Traverse.html
    Life is tough........it's alot tougher if you're stupid.

  3. #3
    Member nibenza's Avatar
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    Default

    It's not a Tarpateepee thing
    Life is tough........it's alot tougher if you're stupid.

  4. #4
    Member nrc's Avatar
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    Default Other Single Walls

    Integral designs makes a number of ultralight tents, both single walled and floorless. I've used several of their products in the winters in the Cascades and I like them quite a bit http://www.integraldesigns.com/

    2 other big companies - Bibler http://www.bdel.com/gear/shelter_overview.php ,

    and Garuda (can't find their website right now) both made excellent tents at one time.

    They have since been purchased by larger companies and I don't know much about current products.

    Have fun.

  5. #5

    Default

    nibezna,
    I have the buck nelson movie, so I'll have to watch it again and pay attention to his tarptent setup.
    nrc,
    I have a Bibler and it's a great tent for what is was designed for (quick assaults for mountaineers). It works and I have no problems with the quality or durability, I just need something that breathes better than the single wall Toddtex fabric. The Integral designs seem to have an almost identical material under their proprietary name, so I'm assuming it will do the same thing. The Integral Designs are very nice as well, I'm just looking to shave as much weight as possible and the Warmlite's seem to be the lightest tents around from the specs. I appreciate all the help though and I'm still open to anything that would shave the weight and keep the condensation down.

  6. #6
    Member nibenza's Avatar
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    Default Buck

    snowcamoman,

    I don't know if it's the same one he used in the 1st movie. It's the one used on the trek he did in 2006. I don't believe that movie is out yet. Here is his gear review if that helps.

    http://bucktrack.com/Alaska_Backpack...st_Review.html
    Life is tough........it's alot tougher if you're stupid.

  7. #7
    Member Buck Nelson's Avatar
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    Default Tarptent

    On my 700 Miles Alone trip I used a Clip Flashlight which I liked fine, but for lightweight backpacking I found the Henry Shire's Tarptent to be much better.

    In certain conditions, there would be condensation on the inner fabric, but I found the shelter to be quite roomy and found it pretty easy to stay away from the walls. On the Appalachian Trail I used a Integral Designs Silshelter. That was a very good shelter for keeping the rain off, and was simple and light, but I had to use a separate Bug Bivy during the summer months when the skeets were out. There was the same condensation with that shelter. Again, not a problem for me as I'd just avoid touching the walls when it was damp out and like the Tarptent I didn't have a problem with condensation dripping on me; if it ran it ran down the walls onto the ground.

    Despite it being a very rainy summer last year I slept dry every single night in the Tarptent. You can't just slap one up anywhere but with good drainage and by choosing protected spots it was a very good choice for me.

    Anyway, pound for pound the Tarpent is the best shelter I've used in a rainy and buggy environment. I've never used a Warmlite so I don't know how they would compare.

  8. #8
    Member nrc's Avatar
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    Default Check the vent locations(?)

    I hear you on the condensation. Winters at altitude in OR/WA are damp.

    The upshot of the ID design compared to the Bibler was the qty and location of the peak and door vents. This made quite a bit of difference for me.

    Good luck on your quest - if you go with the Stephenson let us know how it worked out for you.

    Nate

  9. #9

    Default

    Buck,
    Thanks for the input on what's worked for you. What Tarptent model did you use? Do you think that one of these would perform well in very windy conditions for sheep hunting or do you think that a freestanding tent would be better suited? I'm looking at the Tarptents a bit and they appear very simple and light (both good things). If I get the Warmlite, I'll let everybody know how it performs and try to post some photos of the setup as well.

  10. #10

    Default

    Sorry to be posting again after my own post, but I was reading on Henry Shire's Tarptent page and there's a reference to the Warmlites. Here's a link on it. It's under the "All in the Fabric" section.

    http://www.tarptent.com/projects/tarpdesign.html

  11. #11
    Member Buck Nelson's Avatar
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    Default Virga

    Hi snowcamoman,

    I used the original model of the Virga. Probably 90% of the evenings I camped north of or above treeline. I dealt with the wind by setting up in sheltered areas. One of the few times I set up on a classic gravel bar type spot (spots I usually avoid for the following reason) the beautiful quiet sunny evening turned into a screaming wind. I was still OK, but only because I set my Pro Pioneer on edge as a windbreak. I should have been smarter and camped in an opening in the willows or out of the wind elsewhere. That was the only time all summer that wind was a hassle for the Tarptent.

    I will use my Tarptent on my next solo sheep hunt, and it will keep me dry because I'll set it up in good spots, but if you want to be bolder on where you set up and want a shelter that can withstand some harder winds combined with rain, you'll probably want a freestanding tent.

    Buck

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