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Thread: Repairing digital camera

  1. #1
    Member mod elan's Avatar
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    Default Repairing digital camera

    I have an old Sony Cyber-shot 2.1 model #DSC-S50. It took a swim during last month's sheep hunt (actually everything went swimming) and would like opinions about fixing it or not. I opened it and dried it out, but the power light only comes on for a split second then it dies. Seems to me like a circuit breaker triping when I turn it on. At one point it was powering up, but the screen was messed up so I let it dry more and now nothing.

    Is it worth fixing? If so, who should I take it to?

    I realize this thing is old and they are cheap on e-bay. Just a nice beater camera to take hunting. And it actually takes good pictures!

  2. #2
    Member Tight Lines's Avatar
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    I learned along time ago, with electronic devices buy the cheepest one you can. When it breaks or falls in the dring, throw it away and get another one!!

    Seriously it's not worth getting fixed. I bought a Cannon 10 MP and a water tight case for it and never worry about it getting wet, plus I can get some great under water shots:

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    Wet digital cameras are almost never worth the cost of repair. Even if it is an easy fix, few reputable repair places will give you an estimate less than the cost of a replacement. Too many chances of a later failure due to corrosion.

    However, the best thing to do when any camera gets wet is to quickly remove the batteries, and remove any external body panels that can be gotten to. Then dry it out for several weeks. Don't put the batteries back in until it is completely dry in every nook & cranny. Really, were talking several weeks in a warm dry place. Don't load the batteries before then. Then put the batteries back in and try it out. It might actually work.

    Water will not damage electronic parts if there is no power applied while wet. However, water will usually cloud the lens elements as it dries, and can get in between the digital sensor and the AA filter that lays right up against it. Both will ruin the optical qualities of the camera.

    I did rescue an old Canon Rebel once after dropping it into the Copper River. It was in a bag and was only in the water for 20-30 seconds, so it was not soaked completely. I grabbed it, ripped out the battery and film, tore it down as best I could with a Leatherman, wrapped it in paper towels, and changed them every day until our trip was over. Once it was dry, I cleaned out as much silt as possible from every area I could get to. I used alcohol on a lot of it. I put it back together and it worked fine. -- Then I sold it.

    Actually, it was working fine years later. Never had an issue with it.

  4. #4
    Member mod elan's Avatar
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    Thanks for the input. I did take it apart and let it dry for a long time. It's been a good camera and it's hard to let it go.

    Now the search begins. How 'bout some suggestions on a good replacement camera. Nothing too fancy or too big, medium/large LCD, AA batteries, 7+ megapixel, 4+ zoom, on a budget. Say 300 or less?? I've got some ideas and would like to hear yours. Thanks.

  5. #5
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    The options are huge. When I start looking for a digital camera I usually go to http:.www.dpeview.com and use their compare feature. Camera Land is a sponsor of this forum and looks like a good place to buy from. There are always local dealers as well. Places like Costco have a great return policy, but have a limited selection.

    I have bought and liked several Panasonic and Canon digital cameras. Both take SD cards which as cheap and easily found everywhere. I also prefer to buy cameras that can use rechargeable AA batteries. (Don't bother useing alkaline batteries in most digital cameras. They don't last for more than a few snaps.) Other people prefer cameras that use LiIon batteries. They both have their advantages.

    One great feature to look for is optical Image Stabilization. Either the type that is built into the lens, or the type that moves the digital sensor work fine, and really do help to keep the image stable. Conversely, digital stabilization is a bad joke. Almost as worthless as digital zoom.

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