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Thread: Pack weight problem

  1. #1
    Member skydiver_99654's Avatar
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    Default Pack weight problem

    No matter what I do, I can't get my pack down to a lighter weight for my goat hunt. I believe that everything I need is in the pack. I don't believe I'm carrying anything un-useful. This is just a weekend hunt for goat. Next week I have 4 days to hunt goat solo....how do you guys get such a light pack? Alot of you talk about a pack that only weighs 30-40 pounds !
    Here is my list.... Anything that you would remove?

    H20 filter
    2 game bags
    spotting scope
    cook stove
    3 Mt.house
    7 power bars
    2 glow sticks (lights up the tent)
    1 50ft nylon rope
    1 bone/wood saw
    20 ft parachute cord
    1 lighter
    field dressing latex gloves
    2 small knives (with sharpener)
    1 pr. long johns
    2 xtra pr socks
    headlamp
    bug net
    matches
    trek pole
    tent
    dead sled (it is a solo hunt)
    sleep pad
    mole skin for blisters (which I easily get)
    1 lightweight flare
    sleeping bag
    1 polar fleece jacket
    neoprene gloves
    4 xtra AA batteries (GPS & flashlight)
    rangefinder
    GPS
    license/permit
    4 firestarter sticks
    spoon
    Impertech pants/jacket
    map
    pack cover (suppose to be wet this weekend)
    1 garbage bag
    2 H2O bottles
    1 titanium cup
    1 camera
    1 backpackers bear fence (meat protection / me protection)(this is Eagle River Valley ya know.....LOTS OF BEARS )



    Anything you guys would add/or subtract? Seems like I always have around 60 #. Any advice?
    Thanks in advance...
    Johnny

  2. #2

    Default

    How much does that tent weigh? If you're solo, a bivy sack will do just fine. How about the camera? Disposables weigh nothing.
    What kind of sleeping pad are you carrying?
    How much does the empty pack weigh?

    A pound here and a pound there sheds just as fast as it accumulates.

  3. #3
    Member skydiver_99654's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    How much does that tent weigh? If you're solo, a bivy sack will do just fine. How about the camera? Disposables weigh nothing.
    What kind of sleeping pad are you carrying?
    How much does the empty pack weigh?

    A pound here and a pound there sheds just as fast as it accumulates.
    Kelty Ridge tent 4.5#
    Don't know what kind of sleeping pad...but that is 1# or less...easily
    Barneys Packer Pack w/ frame...7#
    Johnny

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Default

    These are things that you have which I do not carry. I am not suggesting that you leave them behind, but if I were doing a 3-4 day hunt up Eagle River for goats, these things would not be in my pack.

    -Latex gloves (sure, they're nice for keeping clean, but not necessary)
    -Glow Sticks (that's what the headlamp is for)
    -Extra Batteries (put new ones in - you'll only be gone 4 days)
    -Rangefinder (might be a good idea - I just don't use one)
    -trek pole (again, people swear by them - I just don't use one)
    -bear fence (you're bringing rope for hanging the meat, but safety matters)
    -nylon rope (great idea, but I don't usually carry it)
    -firestarter sticks (nice to have, but not necessary for building fire)
    -Impertech Gear (I use Marmot Precip - lighter, but probably not as waterproof)
    -Sharpener (2 really sharp knives are enough for 1 animal)

    Again, I know that many of the above things are great ideas, I just personally don't carry them. Additionally, some weight savings can be had by having lighter sleeping pads, bags, and tents. Not suggesting you buy new gear, but that's part of the equation for those with light packs. One thing I would bring more of, though, is Mountain House meals. I bring 2/day usually. I almost always have extras, but I would rather have too much food, especially when it is so light.

    Good luck!

    -Brian

  5. #5
    Member skydiver_99654's Avatar
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    Default H20 bottle

    Should I drop one of the H2O bottles and just keep pumping water every chance I get? That'll shed a pound or 2...
    Johnny

  6. #6
    Member skydiver_99654's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    These are things that you have which I do not carry. I am not suggesting that you leave them behind, but if I were doing a 3-4 day hunt up Eagle River for goats, these things would not be in my pack.

    -Latex gloves (sure, they're nice for keeping clean, but not necessary)
    -Glow Sticks (that's what the headlamp is for)
    -Extra Batteries (put new ones in - you'll only be gone 4 days)
    -Rangefinder (might be a good idea - I just don't use one)
    -trek pole (again, people swear by them - I just don't use one)
    -bear fence (you're bringing rope for hanging the meat, but safety matters)
    -nylon rope (great idea, but I don't usually carry it)
    -firestarter sticks (nice to have, but not necessary for building fire)
    -Impertech Gear (I use Marmot Precip - lighter, but probably not as waterproof)
    -Sharpener (2 really sharp knives are enough for 1 animal)

    Again, I know that many of the above things are great ideas, I just personally don't carry them. Additionally, some weight savings can be had by having lighter sleeping pads, bags, and tents. Not suggesting you buy new gear, but that's part of the equation for those with light packs. One thing I would bring more of, though, is Mountain House meals. I bring 2/day usually. I almost always have extras, but I would rather have too much food, especially when it is so light.

    Good luck!

    -Brian
    THanks Brian,
    I'll get rid of the gloves....the sharpener....2 firestarter sticks (supposed to be raining hard this weekend. need dry timber)...the rope...the batteries...and possibly the glow sticks ( when in bear country..I like to sleep with the light on (light enough to see...dim enough to sleep)). As far as the mountain house, when I'm hunting, I usually have 1 a day, and eat 3 or 4 energy bars daily. If it was a much longer hunt, I would definitely bring more. 4 of those bars have 450 calories (meal replacement bar). The one thing I would like to buy is a new sleeping bag (mine is about 6-7#. Too bad synthetic isn't as light as down....
    One again, thanks Brian...I can probably cut down a few more pounds by removing some of your suggestions. I still think the bear fence comes in handy, there are lots of bears back in there (as you are VERY aware of). I'm not bear phobic, but I'd rather have a little extra cushioning between me and Smokey.
    Thanks Brian,
    Johnny

  7. #7

    Default weekend hunt..

    Here is what I would take on a "weekend" hunt.

    Pack, sleeping bag, tent, sleeping pad.
    Jetboil stove, matches, a type of fire starter (I use the tube stuff)
    3 mountain house, assortment of candybars/clif bars, pop tarts for breakfast, bag of jerky/snack sticks.
    some rope, a victoronix knife and sharpener
    Rhino 120 GPS, satellite phone.
    Spotting scope/and or binoculars. I've done many day goat hunts with binoculars/no spotting scope/wasn't looking for a booner.
    One pair extra socks, appropriate clothing, good boots. I usually always have my pair of crocs to wear after a long day hiking. Nice to get out of the boots and have something on the feet.
    Moleskin stuff for blisters, a roll of athletic tape
    head lamp of some sort with new batteries.
    Wyoming saw, camera with new batteries.
    Garbage bags to put meat and cape in (weekend hunt, should be no spoilage)
    2 big slam bottles for water after I drink the pepsi/mountain dew.
    Grab a big garbage bag to place over your pack when not in use
    rain gear.

  8. #8
    Member 8x57 Mauser's Avatar
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    Lightbulb

    One good length of rope should probably do it. You can hang meat in a tree, you can strap it to your pack. Same rope will do both.

    I wouldn't go without latex gloves. They weigh nil.

    I also wouldn't bring the dead sled. Unless your physical conditioning won't allow, I'd pack meat/cape out on my back.

    I bring one water bottle and keep my filter on me. Of course, in Southeast I'm never without a water source to tap. Up in southcentral you're seldom far from one, either, but I suppose it's possible. The weight of the bottle isn't your issue, it's the weight of the water...

    If it's a weekend hunt, do you need both a pack cover and a garbage bag? Consider a contractor-thickness garbage bag. It'll go over your pack through anything but devil's club, and it'll do meat/cape duty, too.

    Good advice on nixing glow sticks and more firestarters than necessary.

    Oh, and what are the neoprene gloves for? Not something I tend to carry...

  9. #9
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    Default

    Skydiver,
    Its so much easier with all this new light gear and the guys are giving you loads of good advice.....my suggestion:

    I would leave the saw.....I've found that goat horns don't need to be detached from the skull....using a knife, unhinge the jaw at the joint and take only the top half of the skull....

  10. #10
    Member skydiver_99654's Avatar
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    Default Thanks

    Thanks again for all the advice, everybody. I was wondering about the spotting scope? That adds a couple pounds (with tripod). How many of you go goat hunting with a spotting scope? I'm not looking for the biggest goat on the mountain, but I don't want to chase a goat halfway across the mountain just to find out that it is a sub-adult billy either. How many of you find that a spotting scope just isn't necessary when hunting this critter? I understand that for hunting sheep it is very necessary, but I was unsure about goat.
    Once again,
    Thanks to everybody,
    Johnny

  11. #11
    Member Erik in AK's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by skydiver_99654 View Post
    Here is my list.... Anything that you would remove?
    Anything you guys would add/or subtract? Seems like I always have around 60 #. Any advice?
    Thanks in advance...
    Johnny
    H20 filter --carry bleach drops
    2 glow sticks (lights up the tent)--what Brian said (wBs)
    1 50ft nylon rope
    20 ft parachute cord--Carry 50ft and eliminate rope
    field dressing latex gloves--wBs
    2 small knives (with sharpener)--wBs
    1 pr. long johns--you probably don't need spare clothes for a WE hunt.
    bug net--little to no bugs up high in mid sept
    lighter
    matches--lighter or matches not both
    trek pole--just one? If you need them carry two--you'll be glad you did
    dead sled (it is a solo hunt)--pack it out--two loads if needed
    sleep pad--what kind? Thermarests are heavy--ridge rest much lighter
    1 lightweight flare--you expecting the coast guard?
    1 polar fleece jacket--if its spare leave it
    neoprene gloves--wind stop fleece much lighter
    4 xtra AA batteries (GPS & flashlight)--wBs
    rangefinder--if you can shoot to 300yds you don't need it
    GPS--you don't need it in the mountains
    4 firestarter sticks--no wood up high--use stove fuel down low if need be
    1 garbage bag--??
    2 H2O bottles--bring 1
    1 camera--?? if its heavy carry a disposable
    1 backpackers bear fence--ERV or not, you prolly wont have a bear problem in goat country

    Good luck on your hunt

  12. #12
    Member oakman's Avatar
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    Default lighten the load

    I was dealing with the same problem for a sheep hunt I went on this year. What I did was put everything into excel with the description and the weight in pounds. I also set up a formula to list the percentage of what a particular item would be of the total load. This way you can look at it and see that your food weighs 6 pounds and makes up 12% of your load. You can also instantly see where you will be if you cut certain items out and decide if you can live without them for a few days.

    Another thing that I did (picked this up from Tony Russ' book) was to leave a dry bag cached near my hunting area before I started climbing hills. It had extra ammunition, food, dry clothing, game bags, etc. This way if things got bad I wasn't too far from some emergency supplies.

    Also, it is a little late, but look at the foundation of your gear, things like the actual weight of your empty pack, your weapon, etc.

    I think it was on this message board, but look for something similar for a sheep hunt started in July or August.

    Good Luck,
    Oak

  13. #13
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Erik in AK View Post
    bug net--little to no bugs up high in mid sept
    dead sled (it is a solo hunt)--pack it out--two loads if needed
    1 lightweight flare--you expecting the coast guard?
    neoprene gloves--wind stop fleece much lighter
    GPS--you don't need it in the mountains
    Thanks for pointing these out - I thought of these same things when reading it, but forgot them in my reply. I also don't see the need for a GPS in ER Valley - it's a pretty straight-forward place. Never used a dead sled, so I can't speak to their usefulness. The bugs are mostly gone by now, and I also prefer windstop gloves to neoprene. As for the flare, I've never carried one, but.....if he were to get injured up on the side of the mountain, perhaps a hiker in the valley below would see his distress flare. Just a thought.

    1 backpackers bear fence--ERV or not, you prolly wont have a bear problem in goat country
    Although I've never used a fence, I'm assuming that he will be camping in the valley bottom and hiking up to hunt during the day. That valley is absolutely crawling with bears. If there were ever a goat hunt where bears would be a problem, this is the one.

    -Brian

  14. #14

    Default

    Johnny, did you say your sleeping bag weighs 7#'s?? OMG, that is WAY too heavy.

    My mountain bag weighs 2.5 pounds for early season and this time of year, my bag weighs 3.5 pounds and BTW, I'm a big dude.

    Get rid of the glow sticks, extra water bottle, rangefinder, spotting scope, extra batteries, and bear fence. I would also recommend you get a lighter sleeping bag. If you do this, you might be shedding close to 10 pounds.

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    Default

    Definitely agree with Kusko. The sleeping bag, beer fence, extra water bottle and even the tent are adding your extra weight. The other stuff is relatively light in nature. I agree with some of the battery remarks but then again I always have spares just in case. GPS is my best friend!

    It's only a couple days and a good poncho shelter would suit me fine even if it does rain. Then again maybe not! haha...

    Good luck!

  16. #16
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    Default OUt comes

    Out comes the bugnet...matches...dedsled(I'll do 2 trips instead of 1)...gloves (replace them with fleece)...rangefinder...and 1 H2O bottle. The flare is one of those really small aerial flares. I'll be solo and any help I can get is a plus. As Brian said...trying to signal somebody if I'm injured. I already filed a "flight" plan with my other half. If I'm not back by Sunday early evening, call the cavalry. I personally don't like the idea of solo hunts, but not too many people choose to partner up with me when it entails climbing mountains for a game animal that they can't shoot. I'm thinking heavily about buying one of those ACR ELT's. $700 bucks...but how much is my life worth? As for the polar fleece jacket, that is the heaviest clothing I have. I'll be wearing 1 set of mountain pants, and a lightweight poly shirt. I have 1 ltweight pair of longjohns in case I get drenched (this weekend is supposed to be VERY wet), and I have 1 polar fleece Jacket. I don't know if I would get rid of the 1 set of emergency dry clothes. Together, they weigh about 2 pounds (thats including the jacket). I'll make a run over to Sportsmans after lunch to see what they have in sleeping bags that are light. Seems to me that the lightest bags they have are all down. Anybody have a good suggestion on a lightweight synthetic bag? Also...any info on the spotting scope? Waste of time and weight for a goat hunt?
    THanks everybody, If I get successful, I'll owe you all a round at the local watering hole.
    Johnny

  17. #17
    Member skydiver_99654's Avatar
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    Default Bears..

    As Brian has said, that ERV is "crawling" with bears. Every time i've been out there, I've seen 1 half dozen within 50 yards of me. And I've seen HUNDREDS of sets of tracks out there. F & G also says there is a 1,000+ # griz lives out there. I know the bear fence isn't 100%, but it sure helps ease my mind. That fence itself is a little heavy, but it'll protect me at night (hopefully), and protect the meat if I have to make a coupla trips from up high where there are no trees to hang the meat. I've never used a fence before, and I've camped out dozens and dozens of times, but ERV gives me the creeps when it comes down to the bear population. I encourage all of you to get the Registration permit for black bear RL460. Go get yourself an easy trophy, and cut down some of the population back there.
    Johnny

  18. #18
    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
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    Default No Spotter

    I'll be hunting goat in the Misty's in 2 weeks, the spotting scope never comes with. The Swarovskis 10x42 does quite well.

    Good hunting.

    kingfisherktn

  19. #19
    Member BucknRut's Avatar
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    Exclamation Sleeping Bag!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by skydiver_99654 View Post
    ...The one thing I would like to buy is a new sleeping bag (mine is about 6-7#. Too bad synthetic isn't as light as down....

    Johnny
    Jonny - you will do yourself a huge favor by getting into a lighter bag!! I'm not sure what you are carrying, but there are other (better/lighter imho) out there for little (imo) money. I took the advice of several here and picked up a Cat's Meow from North Face last year. It weighs in at about 3#, cutting 3-4# off your back right from the start. It has performed flawlessly for me and I have used it many times over. I think it is rated as a 25 degree bag, but I find it is warmer than most other comparible...I have to vent it often to get the right temp. It will do fine for a spring or fall outing. Oh yeah, they run about $150-$160 and should be able to find quite easily.

    -Joshua

  20. #20
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tracker21 View Post
    Definitely agree with Kusko. The sleeping bag, beer fence, ....
    Beer fence? Where do I get one of those? Sign me up!

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