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Thread: Fish Stock

  1. #1
    Member Tomcat's Avatar
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    Lightbulb Fish Stock

    Encountered a recipe for smoked salmon chowder that looks delicious, so I'd like to cook up a batch soon.

    However, I'm a bit perplexed by one of the required ingredients: "fish stock." The local grocery stores don't appear to carry the stuff, so figure I need to make my own.

    From what I gather, fish stock is derived from boiling a carcass. Therefore, my plan is toss the remains of the next silver salmon that I catch and fillet into a pot of water, then boil on the stove top for an hour or so. Hopefully, I can freeze the leftover broth for future use as well.

    Am I on the right track? Advice, experiences and information on this topic are appreciated.

  2. #2

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    Yes, you are right with a few additions. In at least 2 quarts of water, bring the bones and scrap meat (NO GUTS OR EGGS!!!!) to a boil. Reduce and simmer for at least 2 hours, keeping the liquid level at least to a quart and a half or more. Remove from heat and let cool slightly.
    Once it has cooled, strain it through a colander. The stock you have is very flavorful and will enhance any seafood dish you do. You can freeze it for quite a while, too.
    You should add a bit of pepper, salt and other flavorings if you wish, or season when you use it in your dish. Either works. I freeze this in ice cube trays, and it is really convienient to do.
    Now just why in the hell do I have to press "1" for English???

  3. #3
    Member Tomcat's Avatar
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    Thumbs up

    Many thanks for the helpful and informative reply. Looking forward to giving it a try. By the way, cool idea to freeze the broth in ice cube trays.

  4. #4
    Member grcg's Avatar
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    Default Fishing for simple chowder recipe

    I got a craving for chowder a couple of weeks ago and bought a couple of silvers at Fred's on sale (...no time for fishing this year... )

    The butcher told me his recipe for fish stock and chowder that I wanted to try. And I while I tried to remember both, but I didn't really remember the chowder part - just the fish stock part.

    My soup turned out good...but his recipe was simple and I would really like to get a simple chowder recipe as a starting point for next time.

    The butcher's fish stock:
    1 pound carcass(minus guts and eggs) to 1 gallon water. I put a little salt and pepper in - although he didn't in his recipe. Simmer for couple/few hours. Strain with a couple of layers of cheese cloth. Grind the leftover carcass up for the dog. (happy dog!)

    The butcher's chowder recipe had nice even portions - easy to remember - except that I didn't. I just winged it.

    If anyone has a simple one written down and would be willing to share - it would be great!!!

  5. #5
    Member Erik in AK's Avatar
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    Default

    Fish heads (gilled) make excellent stock too! Also, save your shrimp peelings for fish stock. And a sprig of thyme--gotta have thyme!!

    A suggestion about making meat stocks (I make them all year--In fact I'm making some chicken stock right now)
    If you have the freezer space....Save your bones and carcasses! I bag them separately and when I accumulate a few pounds I make stock.

    For beef: (you can also ask your Carrs butcher for bones--they're cheap)
    Brush 3lbs raw bones in cooking oil, season with salt and roast in a deep pot or roasting pan at 350 for about 80 minutes. Roast previously cooked bones (steak, ribs etc.) for 35 to 45 minutes.

    Move roasting pan to stove top and let cool enough so water doesn't flash steam. Fill with water to cover bones by an inch or so. Bring to boil reduce to simmer. Add 2 carrots peeled/halved, 1 large onion quartered, 5 cloves garlic halved, 4 stalks celery with top leaves), 1 bay leaf, and 1 bouquet garni (2 sprigs ea thyme and parsley, 1/2 sprig rosemary, 1/2 teaspoon peppercorns all bundled in a bit of cheese cloth.)

    Simmer for 2-3 hours repositioning bones as needed. Remove bay leaf and garni after an hour. Strain liquid to remove solids and skim fat. Kosher salt to taste.

    For chicken stock the process is the same except I recommend the extra work of really breaking down the carcasses and cracking the bigger bones to expose the marrow.

    I pack my stocks in 1 qt plastic tubs and freeze. Frozen stock keeps for months.

    Bon Apetit'

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