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Thread: Mushrooms

  1. #1
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    Default Mushrooms

    Has anyone ever had any issues with their Labs eating mushrooms? What symptoms to look for if they have eaten them? Thanks

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    Taken from an LSU AG Center article.
    Mushrooms, which often pop up in lawns following heavy rainfall, can cause vomiting, diarrhea and even liver failure in dogs.Mushrooms in lawns and moldy foods can be health hazards for your dogs. "Fungi may be growing in your yard as mushrooms and in the ‘fridge’ as mold on foods," "It is not unusual for veterinarians to treat sick dogs that have a history of eating these things."
    The mushrooms that are popping up in lawns now following recent heavy rainfall may prove attractive to some dogs. Young dogs, in particular, are prone to chew and eat these things.
    "The clinical signs of illness depend on the species of mushroom eaten," "Fortunately, most yard mushrooms don’t cause more than a bout of vomiting and diarrhea."
    In those cases, the veterinarian says a clue on the cause could be that portions of the offending mushroom may be present in vomited material.
    In more severe cases, although rarely, stomach upset and diarrhea are followed by onset of liver failure – an indication that the mushroom was a toxic species of amanita or a galerina. Abnormal behavior may be associated with ingestion with certain fungi, such as mushrooms.
    In addition to those problems with mushrooms, moldy foods also can be a problem if pets are allowed to eat them. Veterinarians see cases where dogs have eaten mold-damaged foods like cream cheese, rice or macaroni.
    "I probably get a call per month regarding dogs that are exhibiting severe tremors and seizures caused by Penicillium mold toxins," he says. "Sometimes it is the ‘garbage can raider,’ and other times the food was fed to the animal.
    "These are true emergencies and require skilled care to control seizures and detoxify the dog," he adds.
    In either case, the veterinarian says it’s much better to prevent the problems than to treat them.
    "In the case of mushrooms and moldy foods, an ounce of prevention is certainly worth more than a pound of cure," he says, stressing, "Put them in the garbage can where they will be out of reach."
    Simply remove them from the yard as they pop up. Doing so also prevents them from spreading.

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    Default Vet Visit

    Thanks for the information. I also did some research and found some great info on different types of mushrooms and the effects of them. I stopped off at the vet just to get some info and things to look for. The helper at the clinic said that if you are sure it was a mushroom that you should induce vomiting but I wasnt sure what type of mushroom it was that he ate. The actual vet came out and I spoke to her and she had told me that if it was a bad shrum that the dog would have had a reaction to it a little bit after he ate it. He seems to be fine but there is always the scare that it might have been a bad toxic one. Gonna pay close attention to him for a day or two but he should be fine. Just thought I would post a thing about mushrooms because they are all over, its not something every dog owner thinks of and you just never know...thanks again for the info.

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    I have this problem with my 7 year old Springer. He has always loved to eat mushrooms. There has been twice that he has gotten some that caused him to drool like crazy. I mean MAJOR drool, BUCKETS of drool. Not frothing or foam just drool, drool, drool. So bad you don't want him in the house. Last time I just put him outside with a pan of water for several hours. Like 5 or 6 hours then it slowed down. He drank lots of water which was good I figure.

    So that's what happens when he gets the bad ones but he and our two long haired dachsunds LOVE to eat the puff balls. But my Springer will only eat them if they are fresh. Once they get dried out he's not interested. The puff balls don't seem to bother any of them, I guess it's because they are edible.
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and don’t have one, you’ll probably never need one again

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    Default shrooms

    My brittany had eaten some and was acting drunk, could only stand for a little bit and would fall over and her eyes where glassy. Didn't vomit or get the runs though. Took her to the vet and they did some bloodwork and said she was ok, they said that next time we could feed her really burnt toast as the charcoal would absorb the toxins.................

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    Default charcoal

    You can also get a bottle of ActiDose activated charcoal solution to keep in the pet medicine cabinet. I doubt that burnt toast will provide a significant quantity of charcoal and it will not be "activated" (processing of the charcoal which will provide maximum absorption capability).

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    Default Srooms

    My Lewellen Setter ate several mushrooms last fall and went on a little trip of his own. $150 worth of blood work and a couple of days rest and he was off like a rocket - again. No he isn't a Golden Retriever but he does make life interesting
    MERRY CHRISTMAS

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    We have a 6 month old Rhodesian Ridgeback/Black Lab that likes to eat everything. Last week she had 1/3 of a birtday cake and a box of mushrooms to finish it off. The boys had picked these mushrooms from the yard to dispose of them and left them within the dogs reach (as was the cake). Long story short, she was real sick for a couple days, diarhea, and vomiting along with a moan that let you know she was hurting. Talked to the vet and decided to let her body do its thing and kept food from her for a day. Per the vets advice the first food she got was boiled rice and chicken so there was no fat in the diet to insure she could keep it down.

    After having to put our 14 yr old dog down last fall and the wife not being ready for another until a couple months ago. She was sure afraid of the worst with this one. All is well though.

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    I know this is an old thread but it is relevant...

    Three weeks ago - I went through a really difficult time with my Lab "Browning". Browning was a friend that liked to eat just about anything, to include moose nuggets. Well he got really sick over a period of a few days and soon realized he was really sick. We took him to our vet and after multiple tests, it was determined that he had acute liver failure, due to a toxic poison of some type. Because of were we live, the best I can come up with is mushroom poisoning (also something mentioned by our vet.)

    So my note is twofold:
    1. Be careful and watch your dog ( with all this rain) mushrooms are all over the place
    2. I live in Eagle River valley, and would be great if I could find out what mushrooms are toxic for pets, so if and when I decide on a new friend, I am better educated.

    Thanks,

    Quote Originally Posted by bowtechshooter View Post
    Has anyone ever had any issues with their Labs eating mushrooms? What symptoms to look for if they have eaten them? Thanks
    Tony

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