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Thread: Bipod on rifle

  1. #1
    Member ozhunter's Avatar
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    Default Bipod on rifle

    I have used bipods a bunch on varmit rifles and occasionaly on hunting rifles but found the ones I had (Harris) too heavy and inflexible for most hunting.

    I was recently given an extremely light weight bipod that allows the rifle to be panned quite a ways as well letting the rifle roll on it's axis some. It doesn't swivel or pan a lot, but enough for most situaions and is easy to hold in position.

    To the question;they can be darn handy, but are they worth carrying in Alaska after Moose and Bear?

    thanks

    oz
    Last edited by ozhunter; 09-03-2007 at 06:05. Reason: add to post
    il vaut mieux Ítre bon que la chance

  2. #2
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    nope, most clients who've had them on their guns, end up taking them off in about two days.
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  3. #3

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    I have given several honest tries, but even after adjusting to their presence I hated them. Passionately! They tangle in the brush. Getting them the right height on hillsides or uneven ground takes WAY too long. And as you observe, those I tried are heavy.

    On the plus side, I found the extra weight out front helped steady very light rifles for offhand shooting. It also helped tame recoil. But so does extra weight of any sort, but without tangling in the brush.

    Bipods are fine for open country shooting and especially varmint shooting where you have lots of time for setting up, and often shoot lots from one setup. But for constant movement in and out of brush, you'll eventually remove it, stomp on it, and chuck it in the nearest river.

    I do find a simple walking staff useful for hunting, both for getting around and for help as a shooting support. Buy one if you must, but when you tangle it in the brush you'll be inclined to leave it behind. Better in brushy country along much of Alaska's coast simply to use an alder limb for a staff when needed, discarding it when not.

    I will say that a collapsable walking staff is worth keeping in your pack for use after you drop an animal and start packing. In boggy or rough country it will really save your knees when carrying heavy loads.

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    On a recent black bear hunt this past spring in SE. My buddy ended up ripping his sling stix off after day #2, cussing and chucked em' in the bushes. Day #1, he was in denial, trying to maintain a positve attitude on his recent investment in em'. Not good anywhere near alders / d. club.

    p.e. n' sitka

  5. #5
    Member bushrat's Avatar
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    Default depends

    Bipods can be good if you plan on shooting from lookouts and such, but I suppose one could just cut a forked stick. Some shooters don't shoot very well without some kind of rest, and sometimes there isn't a tree handy for a rest, prone doesn't work out etc. We tried one for a season on the 7mag Rem. below. Wasn't worth the weight, but it didn't hang up too bad in brush. It was sure nice and stable though for longish shooting if you have the time to set up.

  6. #6
    Member AKdutch's Avatar
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    Default Bipod

    I purchased a Snipepod quite a few years ago and have found it to work pretty well when I have used it. I keep it in it's pouch on my backpack and just snap it on if I have the chance. It has helped alot on several medium range shots when I had the time to put it on. And it is light enough that I can't even notice it on my pack. Saw one at SW afew weeks ago. John

  7. #7
    Member wykee5's Avatar
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    The deal with bipods is they are a nuisance...right up to the point where it is time to use it. Then they can be indespensible. If you are hunting in heavy brush, like everybody said, they tend to hang up, the gun won't go on your shoulder on a sling or on a pack very well, and your shots are probably close enough to not need it. If you are taking long shots, however, you will most likely have the time to set up, and they are a great aid in shooting. The ones that don't adjust for level are essentially worthless, but the amount of adjustment in a better model with the swivel allows them to be shot from a number of different positions on different slopes. Just a matter of whether the trouble is worth the payoff, and that is a matter of personal hunter opinion.

  8. #8
    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
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    I made myself a set of shooting sticks which double as a walking stick. Originally they were only going to be used for predator hunting, but I'm taking them along on my moose trip this year. Cost me about $6 in parts.
    AKmud
    http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j96/AKmud/213700RMK1-1.jpg


    The porcupine is a peacful animal yet God still thought it necessary to give him quills....

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    AKmud- See now I am going to have to do a search and check cause I am sure that if you came up with plans for $6 shooting sticks you would post instructions for the good people of the ODD to follow. As soon as I find that post its off to homedepot for me...

  10. #10
    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Sticks

    I'm still waiting on the patent to be granted .

    Actually a pretty simple (but effective) design. I bought two 1" dowels 4' long (you could probably go narrower, but I like the stiffness of the larger dowels), a 1/4" carriage bolt about 2 1/2" long, a couple regular 1/4" washers, a couple plastic 1/4" washers, and a 1/4" wingnut.

    Just drill 4-5 - 1/4" holes in both dowels at whatever increments you want (to adjust height of pivot) and bolt it together using the plastic washers between the dowels. Change the position of the bolt depending on the height that you need for the terrain/shooting position.

    I modified it further by adding a small piece of Velcro to the bottom to hold the sticks together while I'm using it as a walking stick, and I found some rubber feet that fit snugly over the end of the dowel to keep the ends from getting all beat up.

    The sticks work great. Just spread them to fine tune the height. I'll try to post a pic tonight if I remember.
    AKmud
    http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j96/AKmud/213700RMK1-1.jpg


    The porcupine is a peacful animal yet God still thought it necessary to give him quills....

  11. #11
    Member ozhunter's Avatar
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    I think I'll leave the bipod at home. I have experienced the brush catching and awkward carry things on previous attempts.

    I don't use a sling when I am actually hunting (I have it in my pack for when carrying out or whatever) because it can snag and can make it hard to take a quick shot if needed, so why add to those with a bipod.

    AKmud, the shooting stick idea is very sound and worth looking into. A whole bunch of African PH's can't be wrong.

    thanks for the input

    oz
    il vaut mieux Ítre bon que la chance

  12. #12
    Member bushrat's Avatar
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    Oz, I consider a sling a necessary item on a rifle, not just for carrying, but to use to stabilize the rifle when shooting offhand. Having to dig it out of a pack all the time just wouldn't be doable for me, would be too much of a hassle. To each their own though.
    Best,

  13. #13
    Member ozhunter's Avatar
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    I agree with you bushrat, but I would rather let a critter live another day than take an offhand shot at any more than 50 or 60 yards, give or take.

    Even with the sling, I don't feel confident taking offhand shots any further than that and have found that wrapping a sling doesn't help me that much anyway.

    If I don't have the sling there all the time, I won't be tempted to take shots I normally wouldn't take and don't get the sling hooked on every bush and twig, but I have it for when carrying out or whatever.

    Having said all that, a sudden rush of blood to the head can make even the best do things they might not normally do, so I hope the sight of a big grizz in ten or so days time, doesn't make me do somethin' dumb.

    oz
    il vaut mieux Ítre bon que la chance

  14. #14
    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
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    Very simple, but they work (and they're cheap!)

    Some photos of my sticks -





    AKmud
    http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j96/AKmud/213700RMK1-1.jpg


    The porcupine is a peacful animal yet God still thought it necessary to give him quills....

  15. #15
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    AKmud- thanks for the pics looks like a fun easy project. I was planning on cutting a branch for for a walking stick on my sheep hunt but I might take the time to construct one of your contraptions before I head out

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