Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: successful haul road hunt

  1. #1

    Default successful haul road hunt

    hey guys just got back this afternoon and finally shot my first Caribou...nothing huge but coming from Georgia where we have big dogs for deer a Caribou is something that I've always wanted to shoot. The first two times we went up we tried to get after them with the bow but couldn't seem to get them any closer than 70 yards and I think thats too far to shoot with a bow...so the third time we decided to take the gun and do the 5 mile hike and turns out both my hunting partner and I brought home a Caribou. I think our plan worked pretty good...we packed very light and cross load our gear...we only pack bare essentials....water pump, game bags, gps, one pair of binos, and only one gun this way if we shot somthing we could carry a heavy load out on the first trip. We decided that we would walk back to the truck every night to sleep and get a nice meal for the next days hike so the cut off time to start walking back to the truck was 6:30 and we ended up shooting both Caribou the first day around 4....and starting walk right at 6:30. Then the next day we starting walking around 7 to bag out the rest of the meat and turns out we packed out both caribou in two trips...
    here are the pics

  2. #2
    Member WaterWolf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    411

    Default

    Congrats and nice picture.

  3. #3
    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    4,670

    Default

    Nice looking Caribou! Sounds like you and your buddy had a great hunt. Glad the 5 mile hike didn't kick you in the butt too bad!

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Sterling, AK
    Posts
    177

    Default

    Congratulations,
    my wife and I are headed up next week. Hopefully we'll connect like you guys did for her first caribou. Did you guys cruise the road until you saw some caribou and then start your walk in? or did you just pick a spot and begin the hike? Enjoy that caribou meat, our favorite is steaks cut from the hindquarter cooked rare on the grill with a dab of butter added to the top.

    John

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    All-I-SAW, AK.
    Posts
    1,036

    Thumbs up

    Good job! Looks like the weather held out for ya.

  6. #6

    Default 1st bou!

    Good job bro, you surely earned it! Ain't the north slope GRAND!
    Attached Images Attached Images

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Wasilla, AK
    Posts
    33

    Default

    What was the temp and conditions (Wx) for the hunt? And the low temp at night. If you did it again would you choose to walk in and out or would you take a tent and stay the night in the field? THX katfish

  8. #8
    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    4,925

    Default

    Congrats and nice picture. Did you see allot of caribou/ hunters up there?
    Living the Alaskan Dream
    Gary Keller
    Anchorage, AK

  9. #9
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    5,765

    Thumbs up Nice!

    Nicely done, Richie! Nice to hear from someone who is not afraid to work hard on this hunt. Lots of horror stories here about the five mile death march, but it sounds like you guys did it just fine.

    Congratulations on some fine meat for the winter!

    Now you've got to check out the Alaskan Pantry section for some good recipes!

    Regards,

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

  10. #10

    Default Thanks guys

    the temp. was perfect for us on friday highs in the mid 40's and at night it got down to 25 so the meat was plenty cool so no worries there...but I would def. choose to walk back to the truck every night instead of carrying a tent/sleeping bag/food/gun/water...etc...all that starts to add up and before you know it you have a heavy pack just on your walk out...bc I think our packs were only about 10lbs when we walked in so we were able to pack out a pretty heavy load the first trip out...so coming back to the truck every night to relax and get some rest was the best decision for us! And the next morning before we walked back out we would get a good meal in us so we had the energy to walk out there and to get the rest of the animal.

    As far as choosing a spot to hunt...we just looked at the terrain and look for a spot where the caribou would have funnel thru...so we found two seperate mountains and decided to walk towards them and then pulled out the binos and started to glass.

    all in all the hike wasn't too bad...I def believe it can break you off if you don't have a solid plan and try to walk out with a heavy load...then I believe its gonna be a LONG hike!!...however a must have is a water filter! there are plenty of water holes along the way so just plug those in your gps and you'll be good to go.

    I'd say if you havn't done the hike then you should give it a try.... just for the story and it opens up a lot of chances to bring home some meat for the winter.

    Richie

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Knik-Fairview, Alaska
    Posts
    927

    Default

    Sounds to me that you do have to be in good shape. A 40-something guy with 40# extra weight probably shouldn't do it. I'm guessing that a person should be in good enough shape to able to walk 15+ miles per day in semi-rough country before she/he should do it. You guys did 10+ miles every day ...not counting what you did while hunting around.

    I'm 47 and 50# overweight ...no 5 miles in/out for me until I shed some weight and get in shape ...I'm workin' on that. I was 20# heavier than I am now and the trend is in the right direction and I'm hiking in the woods several times a week to get in shape. Probably not soon enough for this year's caribou hunt up there, but for sure by next year. Your notes are good for staying calibrated on what someone should be able to do before they attempt the Big Hike.

    Oh yeah ...CONGRATULATIONS! You're going to LIKE that caribou steak.

    Brian

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Eagle River Alaska
    Posts
    31

    Default

    Good trip for us also, had several stalks but nothing transpired till the third day, hit this guy at about 50 yards, after all the Caribou that I have taken, I got a real double shovel versus a shovel and a spike on the other side. Road was the best that it has been in 7 years, the bugs the worst in 7 years... The heat was also bad almost 70 each day and when the wind died, oh the bugs.....
    Attached Images Attached Images

  13. #13
    Member Gr is for Greg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Anchorville
    Posts
    597

    Default I got one too!!!

    I did the big drive up to the Slope with my good friend Mark. He had never hunted big game before. I grew up in NY hunting deer, grouse, and waterfowl from my backyard, so I've been getting used to the different scene up here in AK for the last several years. I did a float trip last year in the Alaska Range. It was a beautiful trip, but we didn't see a single caribou.

    It was a different story this weekend. Just past Galbraith Lake, we hiked up a ridge on the east side of the road to get a look around. We spotted a bunch of cows and yearlings, and three really big bulls lumbering along the plains below. We drove a little further, but did not see anything better, so we went back to the ridge.

    For anyone attempting the five-mile hike in, I would suggest sticking to the ridges and rockier areas as long as you see caribou there. Going a little out of our way and up a few hills was way easier than taking the straight shot across the flat, spongy bowls. The hike was tough, but we are used to hiking with heavy packs. It was nice to get away from the masses; we didn't see anyone else and had a huge amount of country all to ourselves.

    In any case, the second day, we came around a hill to see just the antlers of a nice bull. He was bedded down. We got as close as we dared and waited him out. He finally stood up, and I fired from a good sturdy rest at 150 yards, a much easier shot than I had imagined I would need in that country.

    I could go either way on the question of camping 5 miles in vs at the road. We packed our one caribou out in one trip and had to come back for our gear, so that sucked. The trip over the tundra with no weight was pleasant, so I can see the idea of leaving the gear at the road. It was nice, though, to be able to get up, climb up the ridge, and start hunting right away each day. You'll get more hunting in if you stay out there, but it ends up probably being more work, especially if you only have a few days to hunt. Maybe compromise? Camp 2-3 miles out.

    Anyway, I also want to say that I got a lot of information from these forums before going up. It was a big help to hear about the caribou situation. Thank you all for your posts. To try to return the favor, this is what we saw: there are a lot of caribou spread out in mostly small groups just north of the Brooks. Most that we saw were cows and yearlings, but there are some good bulls around. I am not sure what is going on further north, because we didn't even make it to Pump Station 3. The road is in great condition. No problems with the truck - Chevy Silverado. We brought two spare tires but didn't use either one. Better to be prepared though. We saw what looked like a Dodge Neon. What the heck was he doing up there? Well, he made it. A lot of the road is paved south of Coldfoot.

    I am going to try to post a photo of my bull. He had a double shovel and really thick main tines, but his upper tines were a little underdeveloped. He was shedding his velvet, but it wouldn't all come off, so I left the antlers. I kind of regret that, though. Maybe I'll come back next year and grab them. They'll be nice and shiney then, we'll see.
    Attached Images Attached Images

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •