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Thread: 7MM vs 375 H&H

  1. #1
    Member Toddler's Avatar
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    Default 7MM vs 375 H&H

    I have a question I am hoping the forum can provide some guidance on. I am going on a float hunt for moose starting the 10th. A friend of mine is coming up from the lower 48 to join me. I order to save some of the hassle with the airline he is gong to leave his 7mm Rem at home and borrow a rifle from me. This is our first moose hunt and I am looking for a recommendation on caliber. I have a 300 WM that is my “Go To Gun” and we will be bringing her (Miss Jessica). I have several rifles to choose from but I have narrowed it to the following 7MM Rem or 375 H&H. This will be a rifle for him to shoot so familiarity is not an issue. We both know our limits and will not take a shot outside of 250 yds. Bullet construction is a mild factor because we both like Barns X and Nosler Partitions.

    This is the question. What caliber would you choose and why?

    Thanks
    Drew

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    Let him use the 7mm since it's a caliber/recoil that he's familiar with. If you have time and you/he would like to have that bigger-gun-peace-of-mind (the bear factor), then hit the range one day and let him try the 375. If he shoots it well and is comfortable with it, then take it instead. If bears are of no huge concern to you or him, then stick with the 7mm and good bullets. Good luck...

  3. #3
    Member AkCPO's Avatar
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    Ditto what swampdonkey said.

  4. #4

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    What is the big hassle with the airlines? If he follows their rules and procedures, he should have no more a problem that checking his luggage.
    I travel quite a bit with firearms and the only time I have seen anyone being hassled is when they tried to send loaded guns through. Can't do that. Put it in a lockable hard case and declare it is empty. You may even have to show the agent it is empty, but that is usually no problem.
    The ones that have issues normally are the ones that just insist on doing it their way and not following the rules. If he isn't one of this type, he should bring his own and use what he is used to.
    Now just why in the hell do I have to press "1" for English???

  5. #5

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    BTW, depends on where you are going would determine the choice between the 7mm and the .375. If in brown bear country, I would take or have your buddy use the .375. Otherwise, the 7mm and your .300 will do fine. A moose is really not that hard to kill, but is a B-I-G piece of meat to put down. I have killed moose with a .44 Mag handgun, a .35 Remington in my Contender pistol, a .280 Remington, .338 and .375, and a bow.
    I strongly, strongly recommend you do NOT shoot a moose in the water!!! Do everything you can to have it drop on dry ground. This being your first moose hunt, these waters are very, very cold, even in the summer months. If you drop one in the water, be prepared to spend some long, cold, miserable hours getting that moose out unless you have a power winch or a bunch of strong men there to help.
    I helped 2 buddies get their moose out of a pond and a river near Fairbanks a few years ago, and will never do that again. Drop a moose in the water with me there and I will keep the fire going for you to come warm up at, but won't get in there to retrieve a moose. Too miserable.
    Your choice of bullets is outstanding.
    Good luck on your first hunt, and please be careful.
    Now just why in the hell do I have to press "1" for English???

  6. #6

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    I'd honestly let him shoot both, then make his own choice. He's familiar with the 7mm, but he might get a real hoot out of using the 375 if he can shoot it well. It would certainly make for better stories back home.

    I've shot moose with both. If there's a difference, they seem to hit the ground faster with the 7mm than with the 375. Both are dead, but mine have all moved off a little after impact with the 375. Maybe luck and maybe a pattern, but if there's water around I want to drop a moose NOW, rather than letting it go even a few steps.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hawken54 View Post
    What is the big hassle with the airlines? If he follows their rules and procedures, he should have no more a problem that checking his luggage.
    I travel quite a bit with firearms and the only time I have seen anyone being hassled is when they tried to send loaded guns through. Can't do that. Put it in a lockable hard case and declare it is empty. You may even have to show the agent it is empty, but that is usually no problem.
    The ones that have issues normally are the ones that just insist on doing it their way and not following the rules. If he isn't one of this type, he should bring his own and use what he is used to.
    Ditto. On Alaskan, you don't have to do anything ...just show up with the unloaded gun packed in a locked hard case. Simple one-liner form to fill out and it's off. You sign for it on the receiving end in the same place you sign for oversize luggage (usually a garage door near the baggage belt.)

    Brian

    PS: In answer to your question, either gun will work fine. If you're worried about bear, put sturdy premium ammo in it (like Barnes TSX or Nosler Partitions, etc). Like everybody else said, take the one that he can hit a target with without flinching.

  8. #8
    Member Toddler's Avatar
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    Thanks gents - Drew

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    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Default A couple of things-

    Quote Originally Posted by Hawken54 View Post
    BTW, depends on where you are going would determine the choice between the 7mm and the .375. If in brown bear country, I would take or have your buddy use the .375....
    I've located a map that shows exactly where in Alaska a hunter could expect to encounter a brown bear. I'm posting it with this reply; it's the area in red.

    As has been said here many times, shot placement, caliber and bullet selection are ALL equally important. Your friend should shoot something he is comfortable with. In most cases that's the rifle he already owns. How many stories have you heard where things didn't go well, because the man behind the trigger was not familiar with the particular weapon he was holding. Borrowed (and therefore unproven) guns make me really nervous.

    On the other hand, I'm not comfortable with the 7mm in a bear encounter. I own one and have taken many animals with it (it's a fine moose gun, and I have taken several with it). But I switched over to the .375 when I started hunting Alaska commercially, because of the increased risk of bear problems.

    Hope it helps!

    -Mike
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  10. #10
    Member bushrat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hawken54
    If you drop one in the water, be prepared to spend some long, cold, miserable hours getting that moose out unless you have a power winch or a bunch of strong men there to help.
    While it's true that a moose dying in the water can be problematic, if you know what you're doing it isn't that big of a deal. Pic below is my 16-year-old son and 17-year old daughter dealing with one in the water.

    Inre Toddler's initial question on what rifle for his friend, I am not sure what this line means:
    This will be a rifle for him to shoot so familiarity is not an issue.

    I'm somewhat uncomfortable with the notion that a rifle is a rifle, they are all the same... no big deal. I'd always opt to have my own known/used weapon rather than a borrower. In any case, if it were my friend I'd firmly insist he shoot both first, become familiar with the rifles (including safety operation!) and choose the one he feels most comfortable with. Good luck on your hunt Toddler. (and ps, Mike, I think when people say "brown bear" they are talking about coastal bears much larger than grizzlies, which technically are also brown bears. Liked your map though <grin>!)


  11. #11

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    You got me there, Mike. You can encounter bears anywhere in Alaska, for sure. I was referring to coastal brownies, tho...

    Bushrat, if that is as deep of water as I had to get the moose out, it wouldn't have been that bad at all. But, that shallow is not where many a moose shot in the water ends up. One of the moose I was talking about fell in water over my head, and we had to float/drag it over to an area we could handle it, which was about mid-thigh deep in mud and muck, not on a rocky bottom. That would not have been nearly as bad. Couldn't get it out any farther. There were only 2 of us, and he was a little squirt, so I had the bulk of the heavy part, and had to wade into that pond nearly up to my neck to get a rope on an antler. Not a pleasant time.
    Now just why in the hell do I have to press "1" for English???

  12. #12
    Member bushrat's Avatar
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    Hawken, maybe a third of the moose I've gotten have died in the water. Moose never end up in that shallow of water like in that pic until you cut the head off and then drag them to the shallows <grin>. Ponds with mucky bottoms are bad for sure...but rivers aren't that big of a problem after you cut the head/antlers off. The antlers are what they always hang up on when you start to pull them to shore. We once had to do the swim-out naked, tie rope to antlers, tow back to the pond shore. You're right, no fun there. Glad you got it taken care of okay.

  13. #13
    Member SoggyMountain's Avatar
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    Laughing at Strahan (who thought he had a sense of humor?)...but THAT WAS GOOD!

    Seconds, thirds, or fourths to "what's the hassle?"

    My guns can go everywhere with me in the US... and my long guns travel through Canada unmolested.

  14. #14
    Member Toddler's Avatar
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    Gents I am sorry that I did not explain the difficulty with flying with Firearms. My friend is flying out of Washington DC where owning a firearm is an egregious crime!

    Bush Rat the comment about familiarity is meant that we recognize that it will be a new gun to him and he is not going to be familiar with that particular rifle. However, we both have Model 70 7mm Rem rifles so I am not too worried about him knowing the gun. He will have a day to make friends wit it before we head out.

    Everyone – thanks for the advice. We will shoot both and choose the one he like. I am willing to bet even money it will be the 7mm. Again thanks

    Drew

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    Member Dan in Alaska's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Toddler View Post
    Gents I am sorry that I did not explain the difficulty with flying with Firearms. My friend is flying out of Washington DC where owning a firearm is an egregious crime!

    I have flown out of DC with guns. Even a handgun!

    I left a handgun and a shotgun at my parents' place when I moved to Alaska in 2001. My dad was transferred to PA after I moved, and after a holiday visit to their new house, I decided that I would bring my guns home with me on the plane. My wife and I flew out of Washington DC, so we could take advantage of our Alaskan Airlines companion fare ticket.

    After hearing all the horror stories about the anti-gun stance of our nation's capitol, I was a bit nervous at the DC airport, with a handgun in my checked baggage. I am happy to report that I had no troubles at the ticket counter with either gun. None at all.

    TSA did page me later, however, and had me report to an x-ray area to search my bag. They were quite concerned about the Zippo lighter I purchased at the Zippo factory in Bradford, PA. The lighter was NEW and never had fluid in it - still had the factory sticker and seal on it. The TSA agents said the fluid in the lighter was making their sensors crazy, and they continued to stick with their story even after I explained that the lighter was brand new, and never used. After some discussion, they put the lighter back in my bag and sent me on my way.

    I found it rather funny that in Washington DC, of all places, my guns didn't arouse any suspicions, but that my unused Zippo lighter caused such a fuss. I would give your friend the green-light to bring his hunting rifle to AK, but for Heaven's sake, leave that dreadful Zippo at home!

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